Curricular Advice

 

Suggested courses for students interested in pursuing a career in public interest:

 

Capital Punishment Law Credit 2 sem. hrs.
This course will examine the complex substantive and procedural law governing the imposition of the death penalty in the United States. The course will focus on the development of Eighth Amendment jurisprudence, discuss the role of aggravating and mitigating evidence, and consider limitations on eligibility for the death penalty. In addition, the course will analyze issues affected the death penalty, including race, poverty, a client’s mental health, the adequacy of counsel, and prosecutorial discretion. Procedural issues, including motion practice and the pleading and practice associated with the state post conviction petitions and federal habeas corpus petitions will also be discussed. The course use a standard casebook, and will also involve the students in solving problems.

 

728 Civil Rights Credit, 3 sem. hrs.
An examination of civil rights legislation including Reconstruction era acts, and more recent legislation prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, sex, or physical or mental handicap in public accommodations, housing, education, and programs receiving federal financial assistance. The course focuses on litigation to enforce civil rights, and considers remedies, defenses, immunities, damages and rights to attorney fees.

 

673 Elder Law Credit, 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to provide students with a basic foundation for providing legal services to older persons. Because the specialty of elder law is defined by the type of client served rather than by a particular area of law, the subjects covered overlap with certain topics covered in other courses, such as Administrative Law, Law and Medicine, Wills and Estates, and Trusts. Topics covered in the Elder Law course will include such things as age discrimination, basic estate planning, entitlement to public benefits, planning for health and long-term care needs, challenges presented by physical or mental incapacity, exploitation of the elderly, end-of-life decisions, and ethical problems related to representing the elderly.

 

663 Immigration Law Credit, 2-3 sem. hrs
This course will serve as an introduction to the field of United States immigration and naturalization law. It will focus on the history of Immigration laws, immigrant and nonimmigrant visa status, citizenship, exclusion, detention and removal, relief from removal, asylum, and immigration laws broader implications on homeland security, national security, and economic policies.

 

770 Legal Extern Program  Credit, 3 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for-profit organization, or a governmental agency. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component. (Note: This course counts for two non-classroom credit hours.)

 

771 Legal Extern Program II Credit, 3 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for-profit organization, or a governmental agency. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component. Legal Extern Program 770 is a prerequisite. Students who take this course may not take Legal Extern Program 772. (Note: This course counts for two nonclassroom credit hours.)

 

772 Legal Extern Program III Credit, 6 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for-profit organization, or a governmental agency. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component. Students who take this course may not take Legal Extern Program 771. (Note: This course counts for four non-classroom credit hours.)