Course Descriptions

CodeCourse NameCredits
500 Principles of Legal Analysis0 sem. hr.
This course is designed to help first year students further develop analysis and writing skills, including rule analysis, case briefing and statutory interpretation. Focus will be on the integration of specific skills and exercises that are both substantively relevant and address specific areas of concern in the first year doctrinal classes, while focusing on thoughtful analysis and essay writing techniques. Active learning and self-assessment will be emphasized throughout the course, and extensive individualized feedback will be an important component.

Note:Note.
502 Torts I3 sem. hrs.
General principles of civil liability for breach of duty created by law, including: intentional interference with person and property and privileges thereof; negligence and the defenses thereof; damages, wrongful death and survival, imputed negligence, strict liability, products liability, nuisance, misrepresentation, defamation, privacy, misuse of legal procedure, interference with advantageous relationships and major statutory modifications (no-fault insurance).
503 Torts II2 sem. hrs.
Continuation of Torts I.
504 Products Liability2 sem. hrs.
A study of the law relating to liability for injuries caused by defective products, including an examination of theories of liability, potential defendants, defenses, issues of proof, causation, damages, and regulatory issues.
505 Advanced Torts2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will explore significant areas of tort law not covered in Torts I?and?Torts II and not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Topics may include the law of defamation, privacy, interference with advantageous relations, misuse of legal procedure, and misrepresentation.
506 Contracts I3 sem. hrs.
Fundamental concepts and principles of contract law and the law of sales, including competency of parties, offer and acceptance, consideration, mutuality, counteroffer, rejection, lapse, execution, breach, remedies, assignment, third party beneficiaries, parole evidence, Statute of Frauds, and discharges. Relevant U.C.C. provisions are studied in conjunction with certain concepts or principles.
507 Contracts II3 sem. hrs.
Continuation of Contracts I.
508 Sales and Leasing3 sem. hrs.
A study of Articles 2 and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code and other state and federal statutes governing the sale and lease of goods. Coverage may also include selected provisions of the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods.
509 Mission First Legal Aid Clinic3 sem. hrs.
The Legal Aid Clinic will provide skill-focused instruction reinforced by providing legal advice and assistance to clients. Students may participate in client interviewing, client conflict records, client communication, legal research, document preparation, court proceedings and trial in the subject matter areas of government benefits, housing, consumer matters, income tax, guardianship, child support, and family law matters. Students will meet with the instructor for one hour per week during the semester. Each student will be required to log a total of at least 150 hours of time in classroom meetings, a trial, hearing or other proceeding. All participants will be supervised by the course instructor. Class enrollment is limited. Graduating third year students will be given preference if there are more applications than available clinic openings. Students must be eligible for admission under Mississippi Law Student Limited Practice Rule. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
510 Hazardous Waste Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an overview of civil and criminal liability for hazardous waste contamination and the federal law concerning hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal. Course readings and discussion will emphasize CERCLA and RCRA.
517 Comparative Products Liability2-3 sem. hrs.
This course provides an introductory survey of Comparative Law with a focus on the Civil Law and Common Law legal traditions. Topics will include the history of these traditions, structures and roles of legal institutions within these traditions, sources of law and interpretive practices. The course will then focus on comparative study of the law of products liability with emphasis on the American and European approaches to liability for injuries caused by defective products, theories of liability, defenses, proof, causation, damages and regulatory issues.
518 Comparative Corporate Governance and Securities Regulation2-3 sem. hrs.
This course presents a comparative overview of corporate governance issues and Securities Regulation focusing on the US, the European Union and some Asian countries. It seeks to encourage the study of comparative law as a means of thinking about law in a globalized economy.? The course will provide an introduction to economic theories as well as an analysis of the OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. Specifically, the laws and practices in the United States and some European Union Member States will be discussed and compared. The course will also compare the regulation of securities transactions in these jurisdictions. Issues considered will include the public offering of securities to investors outside an issuer's home country, the periodic disclosure required of an issuer whose shares are held by investors outside its home country,?and the reach abroad of nationally based anti-fraud regimes.
519 The Civil War and the Constitution3 sem. hrs.
This course will examine the constitutional history of the United States from 1845 to 1877, paying attention to how the U.S. Constitution shaped the Civil War, and also to how the war left its mark on the Constitution. In this seminar, we will discuss such issues as congressional power to regulate slavery in the territories, the problem of race and slavery in constitutional law, suspension of civil liberties during wartime, congressional and presidential war powers, the respective powers of the state and federal governments, and the meaning of the Reconstruction (13th, 14th, and 15th) Amendments. Grades will be based on an original research paper, class participation, and a presentation on the research performed for the paper. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
520 Legal Project Management2 sem. hrs.
This course will investigate the reliance upon the billable hour by both law firms and clients. The course will evaluate the problems with the billable hour, including ethical considerations, and will review common complaints by clients at the various stages of the engagement. These concepts will form the baseline for a study of legal project management and the need for a more methodical and predictable approach to the management of legal matters and teams. The course will evaluate the use of these tools in small engagements, repetitive commodity engagements, electronic discovery, document review and engagements involving unique legal issues. The course will conclude with a class exercise where students will implement these techniques in a mock legal engagement. Students must have 60 credits prior to taking this course. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed sixty credit hours.
521 Comparative Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course provides a survey of Comparative Law with a focus on the Civil Law and Common Law legal traditions. Topics covered include the history of each tradition, the structures of government and court systems, legal education, the roles played by legal actors, civil and criminal procedure, and sources of law as well as interpretive practices. The course also considers selected problems in comparative constitutional law. Among the topics discussed are: comparative individual rights and liberties, including the rights of the accused, constitutional entrenchment, the structure and procedure used by constitutional courts, foundational case narratives, separation of powers in comparative perspective, and federalism in comparative perspective. In the Summer Legal Studies in Merida program, special attention will be given to these doctrines and procedures in Mexico, especially in the State of Yucat?n.
522 Constitutional Law4 sem. hrs.
History and development of the U.S. Constitution; the judicial role in constitutional interpretation; the division of powers among the three branches of government; relation of the federal government to the states; constitutional limitations on the federal government and the states as related to the protection of individual freedoms, rights and guarantees.
524 First Amendment3 sem. hrs.
A study of the development and current status of constitutional law governing establishment and free exercise of religion, and free speech, press, assembly, and petition.
525 Capital Punishment Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will examine the complex substantive and procedural law governing the imposition of the death penalty in the United States. The course will focus on the development of Eighth Amendment jurisprudence, discuss the role of aggravating and mitigating evidence, and consider limitations on eligibility for the death penalty. In addition, the course will analyze issues affecting the death penalty, including race, poverty, a client?s mental health, the adequacy of counsel, and prosecutorial discretion. Procedural issues, including motion practice and the pleading and practice associated with the state post-conviction petitions and federal habeas corpus petitions will also be discussed. The course use a standard casebook, and will also involve the students in solving problems taken
526 Themes in Comparative Constitutional Law1-3 sem. hrs.
This course illuminates important concepts and themes in constitutional law by considering them from competing national and international perspectives.? The course begins with a general introduction to the concepts of constitutionalism, rights, duties and rule of law.? The course then addresses the different roles constitutions play in different states.? The course will then shift to focus on a specific them in comparative constitutional law such as Religious, Racial, and Ethnic Pluralism; Separation of Powers; Social Welfare Rights; or Freedom of Expression.? The specific theme may differ from semester to semester.? Students may be required to write and present a paper.? When this course is offered for two credit hours and a paper is required, students who wish to use the paper toward satisfaction of the writing requirement may do so.? When this course is offered for three credit hours and a paper is required, the paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
527 Solo and Small Law Practice2 sem. hrs.
This course provides an introduction to the overall practice of law in small and solo firms and the practice of law in small towns and rural settings. Similar to law practice management, this course places a particular emphasis on the management of solo and small firm practice. Students explore the decision to start a solo or small law practice; how to build that practice; affiliational arrangements and partnership agreements; particular management issues; ethical and malpractice pitfalls and malpractice insurance; substantive and administrative systems; law library and other information resources; computer hardware and software; client development and client relations; fee setting, billing, and collection; financial planning and budgets and problems most often associated with the practice of law in small and solo practices that tend to exist mostly in small towns and rural areas.
530 Clean Water Act and Wetlands2 sem. hrs.
This course will present an introductory survey of the Clean Water Act?s water pollution control and discharge permitting processes, including the imposition of technology-based and health-based water pollution control measures. The course also will discuss citizen suits, civil and criminal enforcement, wetland dredge-and-fill permits, and state water quality certifications. A practice-oriented approach will be stressed.
531 Food Law and Policy2 sem. hrs.
A study of the laws and policies addressing food labeling, food safety, and food related consumer protection.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
532 Bioethics and Law3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces a variety of dilemmas in biomedical ethics brought about primarily by innovative techniques and technologies that the biomedical sciences have developed; such as artificial reproductive technologies, genetic screening and engineering, and life support systems. Many of these dilemmas are not currently or clearly regulated by law. Thus, the primary focus of our inquiry will be whether these innovations should be regulated by law and if so, how. In this inquiry, ethical and policy considerations will play a substantial role in the analysis.
533 Military and Operational Law2 sem. hrs.
The study of the evolution of military law culminating in the current version of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The practice of criminal law in the military will be compared with that of Federal and State criminal practice to include a comparison of the grand jury system with the Article 32 investigation, the Federal Rules of Evidence and the Military Rules of Evidence, and the conduct of civilian criminal trials with courts-martial. This course will also examine the status of the service member when serving in a foreign country, the applicability of local foreign law to military operations, and the authority of the Foreign Claims Act to provide payment for damage caused by military operations.
535 Regulation of the Health Care Industry and Professionals2 sem. hrs.
This class explores the regulatory environment affecting physicians, health care professionals and health care institutions, including licensing, staff privileges, peer review, and accreditation. This course will also examine the role of the legislative branch of government in health care through a review of major government health programs and policies. Students will learn how health policy gets formulated, evaluated, and assessed prior to being voted into law and will then explore the process of new policy implementation.
537 HIV and the Law Clinic3 sem. hours
The HIV and the Law Clinic will provide students with skill-focused instruction through legal assistance to clients and policy-related advocacy. This clinic is part of a medical-legal partnership between the Mississippi Center for Justice, the University of Mississippi Medical Center, and the Mississippi Department of Health. Students will be exposed to a blend of direct client services and policy work, in areas including employment discrimination, housing violations, and other conduct based on the client’s HIV status. Students may participate in client intake and interviewing, legal research, and document preparation; provide research and writing for policy initiatives aimed at improving the lives of people living with HIV; and participate in educating the community about HIV and related laws. Each student will be required to complete 135 hours of clinical work (which includes both direct services and policy work), in addition to the classroom component (a six-hour introductory class, followed by one-and-a-half-hour classes every month during the semester). Enrollment is limited, and students must be eligible for admission under the Mississippi Law Student Limited Practice Act. Students make application to participate. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
561 Criminal Law3 sem. hrs.
An examination of the substantive criminal law, its jurisprudence, origin and sources, including some specific crimes and defenses at common law and under modern statutes.
562 Criminal Procedure3 sem. hrs.
An introduction to criminal justice administration, emphasizing the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments of the U. S. Constitution as applied to pretrial procedure.
573 Property4 sem. hrs.
A study of the interests which may be created in real and personal property. The topics considered include possession, personal property, deeds, freehold estates, future interests, concurrent ownership, property as an institution, the real estate contract, the recording system, title assurance, easements, landlord-tenant law, and land use controls.
575 Land Use Controls3 sem. hrs.
This course examines the legal tools used by governments, landowners, and their neighbors to influence the development and use of land. The specific topics covered include takings, planning, zoning, subdivision and design controls, racial and economic implications of government policy, and homeowner associations.
580 Legal Research I1 sem. hr.
Provides an introduction to the sources of law in the American system, the legal research process, and specific instruction in finding and analyzing primary and secondary source materials.
581 Legal Research II1 sem. hr.
Provides specific instruction in finding and analyzing administrative and legislative history materials and allows students to develop skills in comparing the effectiveness of research using print and electronic resources.
582 Legal Writing I2 sem. hrs.
Development of skills in analysis and writing in the context of writing primarily interoffice or predictive memoranda with emphasis on plain English. Students build from early exercises applying a rule to a short set of facts to synthesizing and applying complex rules to more extensive fact patterns.
583 Legal Writing II2 sem. hrs
Introduction of persuasive writing techniques; building on analytical skills developed in first semester, with increased emphasis on organizing persuasive arguments. Students will prepare one or more briefs and participate in at least one oral argument.
587 Legal Writing III3 sem. hrs.
In this course students will be exposed to the functions of appellate review, the record on appeal and, the theory of brief?writing?and oral argument. Students will also learn the fundamentals of transactional?writing?through drafting and negotiating exercises.

Prerequisite: LAW?582 - Legal Writing I, LAW?583 - Legal Writing II, LAW?580 - Legal Research I?, and LAW?581 - Legal Research II?
600 Law Review1 sem. hr.
This course is designed to teach techniques and research methods for legal writing in connection with the Mississippi College Law Review. Each student is required to produce written work, acceptable for publication, in order to receive credit for the course. Students are selected for membership on the basis of academic standing and legal research and writing ability after the first year. One hour of credit is given for each semester of satisfactory participation as a board or staff member. A maximum of four semester hours may be earned for law review participation.
601 Appellate Advocacy2 sem. hrs.
This course deals with the functions of appellate review, the record on appeal and, the theory of brief writing and oral argument.

Prerequisite: LAW?582?-?Legal Writing I,? LAW?583?-?Legal Writing II,?LAW?580?-?Legal Research I and?LAW?581?-?Legal Research II
602 Advanced Appellate Advocacy1 sem. hr.
Students prepare an appellate brief and participate in oral argument. Members of the law school?s National Appellate Competition Team may be selected on the basis of performance in the course. This course is not required except for those students who wish to be considered for membership on the Moot Court Board or the National Appellate Competition Team. The course is available as an elective.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Litigation Skills (584).
603 Moot Court Board1-2 sem. hrs.
Students are chosen for Moot Court Board on the basis of their performance in the Appellate Advocacy Competition. Board members assist faculty in administering Appellate Advocacy, the Appellate Advocacy Competition and other competitions. Upon approval by the faculty advisor, a member shall receive two (2) credit hours in the spring semester of the third year for membership on the Board. A Board member who graduates in December will be eligible for one (1) credit hour in the fall semester of the third year.
604 Moot Court Competition I1 sem. hr.
Students satisfactorily participating in trial appellate advocacy, pretrial, ADR, or transactional intercollegiate competitions who have not previously received credit for a competition may receive one credit for such participation, provided that competitors participating in competitions not requiring a written brief or other substantial written work product write a ten (10) page analysis on an issue raised in the competition. This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis. ?
605 Moot Court Competition II1 sem. hr.
Students satisfactorily participating in trial appellate advocacy, pretrial, ADR, or transactional ?intercollegiate competitions who have previously received credit for a competition may receive one credit hour for participation in a second competition, provided that competitors participating in competitions not requiring a written brief or other substantial written work product write a ten (10) page analysis on an issue raised in the competition. This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis. ?
606 Moot Court Competition III1 sem. hr.
Students satisfactorily participating in trial appellate advocacy, pretrial, ADR, or transactional intercollegiate competitions who have previously received credit for a competition? may receive one credit hour for participation in a? third competition, provided that competitors participating in competitions not requiring a written brief or other substantial written work product write a ten (10) page analysis on an issue raised in the competition. This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis.
607 Phillip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition I1 sem. hr.
The course prepares second and third year law students for the year-long Jessup International Moot Court Competition, which includes regional, national and international rounds. The course includes an introduction to the primary sources, doctrinal rules and principles of international law, as well as the methodologies of advanced research in international law. Students will work in small groups and learn how to evaluate and solve problems in international law. Enrollment requires each team member to devote at least 6 hours per week to research, writing and oral arguments. Enrollment is limited to a maximum of five students. Participation and enrollment is subject to approval by the Director of Advocacy and a faculty advisor. The credit awarded to a student for participation in the fall semester of the second and third year, respectively, is a graded one hour (1) classroom credit; and the credit awarded for participation in the spring semester of each year is a one hour (1) pass/fail non-classroom credit.??
608 Phillip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition II1 sem. hr.
See Phillip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition I for description. Jessup II is the designated course for 3L students who participate in the Jessup International Moot Court competition for a second year. Students in this course will also serve as mentors for 2L participants.
609 Adoption Legal Clinic3 sem. hrs.
Students enrolled in this course will learn about adoption law and termination of parental rights in Mississippi. This course is limited to students who are eligible to practice under the limited practice act in chancery court. Students will assist in completing adoptions of children placed in prospective adoptive homes by the Mississippi Department of Human Services, including preparation of petitions and final decrees. Students will prepare all reports and exhibits necessary for adoption, serve as attorneys for the adoptive families and may be appointed as guardians ad litem in termination of parental rights and adoption cases. All participants in any adoption proceeding will be supervised by the course instructor. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
610 Youth Court Clinic3 sem. hrs.
This course will examine the substantive and procedural laws governing cases of alleged child abuse and neglect, termination of parental rights and finalization of adoptions in Mississippi courts. Students will represent children in the court system with the close support and supervision of a faculty member. Building on the field experience of actual case handling as a basis for analysis, it seeks to make students more self-critical and reflective about various lawyering functions they must undertake. In order for students to effectively represent juvenile clients, the course will include instruction concerning child psychology, identifying signs of child abuse and neglect, client interviewing and case file management. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 45 credit hours.
611 Child Welfare & Family Justice Clinic3 sem. hrs.


Prerequisite: The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
612 Guardian Ad Litem Clinic3 sem. hrs.
Students enrolled in this course will learn about child custody and parenting issues in chancery court, including adoptions, terminations of parental rights, guardian-ships, custody matters, child support matters, grandparents' rights, and similar related matters. Students who are eligible to practice under the limited practice rules may be admitted to practice in chancery court for the purpose of handling one or more cases to the matters described above. Students will meet with the instructor for one hour per week during the semester and will also observe or participate in chancery court. All participants in chancery court proceedings will be supervised by the course instructor. Each student will be required to log a total of at least 80 hours of time in classroom meetings or court proceedings. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 45 credit hours.
613 Accounting for Lawyers2 sem. hrs.
A study of the basic principles, conventions and methods of accounting to enable the lawyer to understand the legal economic environment, with specific reference to the accounting problems encountered in such courses as Federal Taxation Law and Business Associations I?and Business Associations II. This course is recommended for students without a substantial foundation in accounting. Except with the written permission of the instructor, this course is not open to students who have completed the equivalent of six semester hours in accounting.
614 Accounting Issues in Business Decisions3 sem. hrs.
The course provides an introduction to the analysis and use of corporate financial reports from the perspectives of investors, creditors and other external users. Coverage ranges from the pressures faced by management, accountants and auditors as they prepare financial statements to the impact of accounting information on strategic decisions. From an internal decision-making perspective, the course examines the preparation and use of managerial accounting information. Topics include activity based costing, decision support systems including relevant costs and benefits, and budgeting systems. This course is limited to joint J.D./M.B.A. candidates.
615 Policy Formulation and Administration3 sem. hrs.
The capstone course for the graduate business school curriculum that integrates the fundamental aspects of business (marketing, finance, accounting, economics, operations) into a coherent view of management. Through the case analysis method, students study the role of strategy in the management of large and small firms and investigate the principles and practices that lead to successful organizations, both public and private. This course is limited to joint J.D./M.B.A. candidates.
616 Agency2 sem. hrs.
A study of agency power and authority, termination, rights and duties of agents and principals. May also include issues of master and servant relationships.
618 Wills and Estates3 sem. hrs.
A study of the law of succession of estates including wills, fraud and undue influence, restraints on testamentary powers, capacity, execution and revocation, construction and interpretation, descent and distribution by intestacy; administration of estates, testamentary and inter vivos trusts, and introductory estate tax planning.
619 Business Associations I4 sem. hrs.
A study of the law of business organizations, including partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. Topics may include choice of business form, formation, organization, capitalization, rights and relationships between owners and the organization. Related state and federal topics may be selectively covered.
620 Business Associations II2 sem. hrs.
Building on the general principles covered in Business Associations I, this course explores in detail the state and federal laws and regulations which govern the formation, management, and dissolution of business enterprises. Special emphasis is given to issues relating to business finance, such as capitalization and distributions, compliance with Federal and state securities laws, and the rights of investors to participate in management of the business.
621 Secured Transactions and Creditors? Rights3 sem. hrs.
This course covers Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It deals with the law governing security interests in business collateral, such as equipment, inventory, accounts receivable, and chattel paper as well as the financing of purchases by consumers. The course will also cover consumer credit regulation, enforcement of judgments, attachments, garnishment, fraudulent conveyances, and assignments for the benefit of creditors.
623 Evidence3 sem. hrs.
Examination of the law of evidence (emphasizing the Federal Rules of Evidence), objectives and limitations of an adversary system of dispute resolution, norms and restraints on advocacy, and allocation of responsibility between judge and jury. Topics explored include: hearsay; relevance; witnesses (e.g., competence, privileges, examination, and experts); documentary and real evidence; judicial notice; burden of proof; and presumptions.
624 Asset Forfeiture2 sem. hrs.
A survey of asset forfeiture law in the United States, covering the history and evolution of forfeiture law, the theories of forfeitability, the advantages and disadvantages of criminal, civil and administrative forfeiture, forfeiture procedure, and the role of the 8th amendment in asset forfeiture law.
625 Civil Procedure I3 sem. hrs.
An overview of the law governing civil litigation. Topics include: personal jurisdiction; jurisdiction of the subject matter; venue; pleadings; discovery; pretrial motions; trial; challenges to the verdict; appeal; res judicata and collateral estoppel.
626 Civil Procedure II3 sem. hrs.
Continuation of Civil Procedure I.
627 Advanced Civil Procedure3 sem. hrs.
A study in selected topics in civil procedure, including: joinder of parties and claims; class actions; pretrial and trial case management; right to jury trial; complex litigation; ADR; verdicts; procurement, enforcement and finality of judgments; appeals.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
628 Compliance in Financial Institutions1 sem. hrs.
This pra ctical course will explore the role of compliance in financial institutions. It will examine the essential elements of effective compliance programs, the regulatory expectations for banks and investment companies, common issues that challenge compliance, and how to establish adequate monitoring systems. This course is particularly relevant as new laws, rules, and regulations stemming from the financial crisis dramatically affect a wide range of financial institutions. The course is recommended for students who wish to pursue a career in compliance or work for financial institutions, regulatory agencies, or law firms representing clients in the financial industry.
629 Advanced Child Advocacy Clinic2-3 sem. hrs.
This Court is limited to students who are eligible to practice under the?limited practice act in chancery court. Students enrolled in this course will?learn about?advanced child custody and adoption issues in chancery court, including but not limited to adoptions involving IPCP, contested?terminations of parental rights, contested guardianships, custody matters?involving third party custody or?in loco parentis, and custody matters?involving UCCJEA, child support matters, grandparent's rights, and similar related matters. Students will continue work not completed in either Law 609 or Law 612, plus will accept additional work assignments to satisfy?the hourly credit requirement. Students will meet with the instructor for one hour per week during the semester and will observe or participate in chancery court proceedings. All participants in chancery court proceedings will be supervised by the course instructor. Each student will?be required to log a total in classroom meetings or court proceedings of at?least 100 hours for 2 credit hours or 150 hours for 3 credit hours. Credits?will count towards experiential learning. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: LAW 609 - Adoption Legal Clinic?OR LAW 612 - Guardian Ad Litem Clinic?
630 Commercial Paper3 sem. hrs.
This course is a study of the rights and obligations of participants in a variety of payment transactions, ranging from traditional methods of payment such as checks and promissory notes to modern methods such as credit and debit cards, automated teller machines and wire transfers. The course focuses on Articles 3, 4 and 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code; however, federal statutes and regulations and their relationship to state law are considered.
633 Oil and Gas3 sem. hrs.
A study of estates or interests of possessors of realty in mineral rights, oil, water and gas below the surface, leases, royalties, bonuses, delay rentals, depletion, utilization, riparian rights, and regulatory practices of governmental agencies and applicable statutes or laws. Some material dealing with geology and geophysics is used.
634 Environmental Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course is a study of the response of the American legal system to environmental problems, including air and water pollution and the disposal of toxic substances. Federal statutes and regulations are emphasized.
635 Worker?s Compensation2 sem. hrs.
A study of compensation to injured workers for industrial accidents, injuries, and diseases. Included are a detailed treatment of workers? remedies prior to and apart from workers? compensation, the compensation principle, the employer-employee relationship, accidents during the course of employment, accidents arising out of the employment, accident and occupational disease, proof of causation, effect of independent causes after the accident, compensation for non-fatal injury, death benefits, and the third party suit.
637 Corporate and Partnership Taxation3 sem. hrs.
An introductory study of the federal income tax concepts applied to entities and their owners in formations, distributions, redemptions, liquidations and terminations, reorganizations and sales.

Prerequisite: Federal Taxation Law (LAW 638).
638 Federal Taxation Law3 sem. hrs.
An introductory study of substantive and procedural individual income tax concepts, including gross income; deductions; identification of taxpayers; problems incident to the sale, exchange and other disposition of property; recognition; timing; and, characterization.
639 Arbitration Practice and Procedure2 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to the arbitration practice and procedure in commercial, employment and consumer arbitrations. Current arbitration rules and procedural issues will be analyzed, including the use of discovery in arbitration and class actions. In addition, the rules of the American Arbitration Association and other leading arbitration institutions will be discussed. Special focus will be given to examining the role of arbitrators, judicial award confirmation and the limited right to appeal arbitration awards. ?
640 Entertainment Law2 sem. hrs.
The course offers a dynamic and interactive general survey of the legal principles and business practices of the entertainment industry. Topics include music, film, television, books, online and live performance. The relationship between artists, managers and agents together with specific areas of entertainment litigation are surveyed. Treatment of the ever expanding global implications of the entertainment industry is also included. Some of the business and legal considerations facing attorneys practicing in the entertainment area are introduced through a series of graded project assignments. No examination.
642 Pension and Employee Benefit Law3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the laws and policies regarding the creation, operation and termination of employee benefit plans, including health benefits and pension plans with emphasis on qualified plans and the Employment Retirement Income Security Act of 1974.
643 Entrepreneurship Law3 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to legal questions associated with the start up and operation of entrepreneurial ventures, which may include social ventures and not-for-profit organizations. Subjects covered include choice of entity, copyright and trademark, e-Commerce, and special issues of management. Some time will also be spent on, employment and executive compensation issues, risk management, protecting the intellectual property of a start up and ethical issues facing attorneys who represent entrepreneurs. The goal of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the legal problems they may encounter in an entrepreneurial setting either as attorneys or as owners of an equity position in the enterprise. The course focus is practical highlighting the skills attorneys need when advising entrepreneurial ventures and clients. Prerequisites: Law 619 Business Associations I.
644 Employment Discrimination3 sem. hrs.
This course deals with the various federal statutes prohibiting discrimination in employment, focusing primarily on the prohibition against discrimination contained in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Other statutes such as the Civil Rights Acts of 1866 and 1870 (42 USC sections 1981 and 1983), the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act are also considered.
645 Labor Law3 sem. hrs.
This course deals principally with labor relations between private employers and employees acting in a collective capacity. It generally involves: historical background; organization and representation of employees; union collective action and collective bargaining.
646 Employment Law3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the law relating to the employment relationship, including the establishment and terms of employment contracts, termination of employment, regulation of pay and hours, protections afforded employees in the areas of privacy and safety, and compensation for employee illness and injury.
647 Health Care Fraud and Abuse2 sem. hrs.
This course examines federal and state laws that impose criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of fraudulent activities. The course explores the implications of the federal Anti-Kickback statute, civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, anti-referral (Stark) laws, and false claim laws, as well as traditional federal white collar criminal laws and certain regulations and advisory opinions applied to health care. The course will use statutes, case law and commentary to identify the various forms of fraud and self-dealing and the law?s response.
648 Expert Witness Seminar2 sem. hrs.
This course deals with expert witnesses and scientific evidence. Students are given an opportunity to participate as counsel in simulated trials dealing exclusively with experts. Trial Practice (LAW 681) is a required concurrent or antecedent course. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
649 Comparative Civil Rights2 sem. hrs.
The course will compare and contrast, from both a theoretical and doctrinal perspective, civil rights and liberties in the United States and other countries and regional organizations. Topics to be covered include freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and other substantive and procedural aspects of liberty and equality. When the course is offered in a study abroad program, special attention will be given to region involved.
650 Sports Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to the foundations of sports law. Sports law reflects how various legal disciplines, including torts, antitrust, labor, agency, criminal, contract, and anti-discrimination laws, impact professional and amateur sports actors, such as leagues, conferences, teams, and players. This course will provide students with both practical and theoretical approaches to legal issues that arise in sports, including in the NFL, NBA, MLB, NCAA, NASCAR, PGA, NHL, tennis, and hunting. Students will read sports law writings, including cases and law review articles, as well as readings from other disciplines, including social psychology and economics. Students will also be expected to discuss current and breaking issues in sports law as they emerge over the course of the semester.
651 Domestic Relations3 sem. hrs.
Family law related to marriage, separation and divorce; rights and liabilities of husband and wife; property rights; parent and child relational rights and duties, disabilities, adoption, emancipation, paternal authority and support.
652 Current Issues in Family Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course examines current issues of family law in depth. Topics change from year to year and may include same sex marriage, civil unions, covenant marriage, legal effects of new reproductive technology, effects of welfare reform on family law issues, ?parental alienation syndrome,? child custody, required mediation in divorce, and other topics of current interest.
653 Global Issues in Corporate Law1-2 sem. hrs.
This course will familiarize students with foreign corporate laws (including those of Germany and other EU jurisdictions), clarify issues under United States corporate law as they apply to global concerns and to challenge assumptions that the United States law is always the most desirable choice.
654 Insurance3 sem. hrs.
A study of the laws and regulations governing the insurance industry including: classification of insurance; the marketing process; the principle of indemnity; the insurable interest doctrine; subrogation; other insurance clauses; persons and interests protected; warranties and representations; concealment; unconscionability; detrimental reliance; and the claims process.
655 Corporate Finance3 sem. hrs.
An examination of the legal and financial factors affecting the manner in which business firms obtain needed capital. Topics include valuation, classes of security, capital structure, dividend policy, and mergers and acquisitions.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
656 Banking Law2 or 3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the law governing commercial banking, including the regulation of activities of banks and financial holding companies by federal and state regulatory agencies as well as laws and regulations pertaining to bank failure, and mergers and acquisitions in the banking industry. The course will also examine the relative advantages and disadvantages of state and nationally chartered banks, and the law related to lender liability claims.
657 Venture Capital2 sem. hrs.
This course will cover a range of issues relating to start-up ventures and developmental stage companies. The course will focus on the balancing of competing economic interests among founders, venture capitalists, directors, management, employees, and shareholders. The goal is for students to obtain an understanding of how these varying interests interact in the early stages of the development of a business and how the law attempts to deal with these competing interests. Topics to be covered will include: Choosing the Appropriate Enterprise Entity, Funding the Entity, Venture Investing, Retaining and Motivating Employees, and Exit Strategies. The course will be interdisciplinary and will include issues relating to corporate, securities, tax, and intellectual property laws.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
658 Business Ethics2-3 sem. hrs.
A study of applied ethics that examines ethical principles and moral or ethical problems that may arise in a business environment. Topics may include issues regarding the moral rights and duties between a company and its shareholders, between a corporation and its employees, between different companies, and between the corporation and society at large. Taking Business Associations I prior to this course or simultaneously with it is recommended.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
659 Small Business Law and Entrepreneurship2 sem. hrs.
This seminar focuses on legal issues in small business associations, from an entrepreneurial perspective. Topics include forming a small business, partnerships, franchising, joint ventures, government procurement policies and programs, commercial leases, employer-employee issues, buy/sell agreements, intellectual property, international trade, and ethical considerations for the small business lawyer.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
660 Remedies3 sem. hrs.
A study of equitable and legal remedies, which includes consideration of equitable principles and procedures and defenses; restitution and unjust enrichment; reformation and rescission; and damages in a variety of contexts.
661 Business Bankruptcy2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on business bankruptcies including liquidations and reorganizations. It also will deal with certain litigation issues in business cases. The course will be particularly beneficial to students interested not only in bankruptcy law, but commercial litigation and business transactions as well.

Prerequisite: Bankruptcy (LAW 753).
663 Immigration Law2-3 sem. hrs
This course will serve as an introduction to the field of United States immigration and naturalization law. It will focus on the history of Immigration laws, immigrant and non-immigrant visa status, citizenship, exclusion, detention and removal, relief from removal, asylum, and immigration laws broader implications on homeland security, national security, and economic policies.
664 Immigration Clinic3 sem. hrs.
The Immigration Clinic will provide students with skill-focused instruction by providing direct legal assistance to clients. Clinic students will be sworn into limited practice and will represent non-citizens seeking various forms of immigration relief; Asylum, Adjustment of Status, Waivers, U visas, relief under the Violence Against Women Act, T visas and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status. Clinic students may represent clients before federal agencies including the US Department of Justice Immigration Court and the Board of Immigration Appeals and US Citizenship and Immigration Services, the immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the US Customs and Border Protection within the Department of Homeland Security. Each student will be required to complete 135 hours of clinical work and a weekly one hour class component. Enrollment is limited and is determined through an application process. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 45 credit hours.
665 White Collar Crime and Business Fraud2 sem. hrs.
This course will examine how business fraud, white collar crime, and regulatory violations are investigated and litigated in the courts and in administrative proceedings. This course will focus on the role played by various law enforcement agencies in conducting investigations and how prosecutors work with agencies to develop a case. Case studies will allow students to understand the strategies employed by prosecutors and defense counsel in preparing and presenting their cases, applicable penalties, and how negotiations are conducted during the course of the proceeding.
667 Fraud and Fraud Investigation Seminar3 sem. hrs.
In recent years statutory and common law fraud actions have filled the courts and the news. Fraud constitutes an increasing concern and target for litigation and enforcement actions. New definitions, procedures and enforcement mechanisms have changed the face of fraud investigation and prosecution. This Seminar will touch on traditional areas of fraud investigation and prosecution along with emerging statutory and common law fraud issues. It may consider both academic and practical aspects on the definition, identification, and redress of fraud and fraud-related issues. It may also cover practical issues of cooperation with government inquiry, and the waiver of privilege. The seminar will have a substantial and comprehensive research project culminating in a paper of high quality that will satisfy the writing requirement .
671 Comparative Health Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course illuminates important concepts and themes in health law by considering them from competing national and international perspectives. The course begins with the question of whether there is (or ought to be) a right to access basic health care services and, if so, from where does that right derive (international law, national constitutions, domestic legislation, etc.). The course then shifts to exploring various types of health care delivery systems employed by different nations. Additional topics include comparative analysis of approaches to medical malpractice, reproductive rights, and issues of global public health concern such as epidemics.
672 Appellate Courts2 sem. hrs.
This course will discuss how appellate judges decide cases, survey the technical legal knowledge that an appellate lawyer or appellate law clerk would need to perform effectively, and address the conflict between what an appellate court does when it makes rules as opposed to what it does when it settles disputes.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
673 Elder Law3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to provide students with a basic foundation for providing legal services to older persons. Because the specialty of elder law is defined by the type of client served rather than by a particular area of law, the subjects covered overlap with certain topics covered in other courses, such as Administrative Law, Medical Malpractice and Health Care Litigation, Wills and Estates, and Trusts. Topics covered in the Elder Law course will include such things as age discrimination, basic estate planning, entitlement to public benefits, planning for health and long-term care needs, challenges presented by physical or mental incapacity, exploitation of the elderly, end-of-life decisions, and ethical problems related to representing the elderly.
674 Health Care Law3 sem. hrs.
This course is a survey of fundamental legal issues related to the health care industry. It provides an introduction to the many issues with which lawyers working in the health care industry need to be familiar, and serves as a foundation for those students wishing to take additional, more in-depth courses in health law. Coverage will include the structure of the health care system, regulatory issues such as licensing, staff privileges, accreditation and certificates of need; antitrust; ERISA; government payor issues (Medicare and Medicaid); HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act); fraud and abuse (including Anti-Kickback and STARK I & II regulations) ; the legal obligation to provide treatment (including EMTALA); and health care reform.
675 Medical Malpractice and Health Care Litigation2 sem. hrs.
An in-depth study of the practical considerations and specialized rules which lawyers need to employ when handling medical malpractice cases. The course will not only concentrate on various theories of tort actions, but also on practical and policy considerations that may be involved in all of those actions such as insurance coverage, emotional distress, damages, standards of proof (including the use of forensic medicine and expert witnesses), apportionment of fault, determination of causation, and special duties. Additional topics may include tort reform issues, compliance and internal investigations, technology litigation, managed care litigation, and ERISA preemption.
676 Education Law2 or 3 sem. hrs.
? ? This course examines education law principles as they pertain to both public and private institutions of learning, the power of the state to compel school attendance, the?constitutional framework within which the state and federal governments regulate?both public and private educational institutions, and the statutory and other protections?of an individual?s right to equal treatment in the educational context without regard to race, sex, or disability.
677 Trusts3 sem. hrs.
The character, creation, validity and use of trusts; types of trusts; rights, duties and liabilities of settlors, trustees, beneficiaries and third parties; fiduciary administration; settlement and distribution; remedies of beneficiaries; tax, real property and future interest considerations.

Prerequisite: Wills and Estates (LAW 618).
678 Appellate Procedure *3 sem. hrs.
The course deals with the functions of appellate review, preserving issues for appeal, appealability, use of extraordinary writs, parties, initiating and perfecting an appeal, relief pending appeal, the record on appeal, the theory of brief writing and oral argument, judgments and mandates.

Note:This course has not been offered in the last three years. We have kept it in the catalog after a faculty review because we have plans to offer it in the next two years.
679 Criminal Practice3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to provide a working familiarity with the procedural rules governing conduct of a criminal case at the trial court and appeal levels, and the practical operation and tactical consideration of the rules. Course includes specific topics such as discovery, grand jury selection, jurisdiction, venue, guilty pleas, preliminary hearings, and post-conviction procedures. Course includes argument and preparation of motions and participation in exercises involving criminal trial issues. This course is intended to provide a practical background for those students who are interested in the prosecution and/or defense of criminal felonies.

Corequisite: LAW 562 - Criminal Procedure
680 Pretrial Practice2 sem. hrs.
The course covers litigation planning, the preparation of pleadings and motions, discovery practice, and pretrial conferences. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with pretrial procedural problems.
681 Trial Practice4 sem. hrs.
The purpose of the course is to give the student actual practice in conducting simulated trials. The matters covered include voir dire, opening statements, examination and cross-examination of witnesses, introduction of exhibits, objections, jury instructions, and final arguments. The student is given an opportunity to participate as counsel in several simulated trial segments, followed by appearing as counsel in a complete simulated trial. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have 45 credits prior to taking this course. Evidence (LAW 623).
682 Federal Courts3 sem. hrs.
A study of the federal judicial system, including the jurisdiction of federal courts, and the function of the system within the federal union.
684 Supreme Court Role-Playing2-3 sem. hrs.
In the roles of advocates and Supreme Court Justices, students conduct argument in, and decide, cases pending before the United States Supreme Court. Each student-justice, in the role of a particular Supreme Court Justice, hears argument, participates in a conference on the cases with the other student justices, votes on the outcomes, and writes a judicial opinion in one or more of the cases. Each student-advocate also writes a memorandum identifying the key issues in the case and their likely resolution by the Court and each Justice. Students who wish to use the paper(s) prepared for this course toward satisfaction of the upper-level writing requirement may do so. Most students receive three hours of academic credit. Students who have already satisfied the upper-level writing requirement may apply to receive two hours of academic credit.
685 Alternative Dispute Resolution2 sem. hrs.
A study of mechanisms to resolve disputes as an alternative to adversarial litigation. Techniques to be considered include mediation, arbitration, early neutral evaluation, summary jury trials, and mini-trials. Mandatory, voluntary, binding, non-binding, court-annexed and private programs will be considered. This course may offer skills training to students in various ADR techniques through the use of in-class simulations. Criteria for selecting cases for diversion to specific ADR techniques and for evaluating the success of such techniques will be considered. The impact of ADR on the role of the advocate and the judge in an adversarial system, on parties and on caseload will also be discussed.
686 Removal Jurisdiction2 sem. hrs.
In this course, students will engage in an in-depth study of the removal statutes, and caselaw interpreting those statures. Specific topics covered include subject matter jurisdiction and procedure in removed actions, remand motions, appellate review of remand orders, and issues related to the removal and remand of class actions under the Class Action Fairness Act.

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I (LAW 625).
687 European Union Law ? Introduction2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an introduction to the legal system of the European Union as a supranational organization, its history and its institutions. In three parts the course will first focus on issues of Member States? sovereignty, European Union decision making and enforcement. Second, European Union policies and internal actions, specifically the internal market, free movement of goods, persons, services and capital will be analyzed. Third and finally, the European Union?s policies on judicial cooperation and external actions will be studied and the impact of these policies on the U.S. and U.S. business will be examined.
688 International Finance3 sem. hrs.
This course will cover issues related to international finance, transactions, policy, and regulations. The course will cover the international economic and financial environment in which firms operate, the elements of international financial transactions, the evolution of international financial markets, the costs and benefits of globalization and the structure and instruments of foreign exchange and Eurocurrency markets. The continuing expansion of U.S. capital market regulation is a major topic, as is the implementation of international accounting standards. While the approach of this course is rooted in government policy and regulation, it introduces students to basic financial concepts and transactions. The course evaluates regulatory and legislative reforms that followed in the wake of the international financial crisis of 2008-09.
689 Mediation Advocacy2 sem. hrs.
This course focuses on the perspective of the legal advocate in the mediation process. The course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and hands-on experience. The course materials and exercises will discuss different mediation models and mediator styles, mediator selection, attorney preparation, client preparation, as well as advocacy during the mediation session. Students will explore how rules of professional conduct and ethical standards impact mediations. Students will participate in class-based simulations, interactive role-playing, and post-mortem discussions.
690 Election Law2 sem. hrs.
This course explores constitutional, federal and state statutory and political aspects of the American electoral system, specifically examining the history of the voting rights struggle, campaign finance restrictions and election reform. The bulk of the course considers the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which some legal scholars have termed one of the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation ever passed, the Help America Vote Act of 2002, the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, the Federal Election Campaign Act and various related state laws.
691 Native American Law2 sem. hrs.
This course examines the systems of law that apply on Native American reservations and tribal lands and how laws are formulated, enforced, and adjudicated on these lands, with emphasis on the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.
692 Federal Pre-Trial Practice (Civil)2 sem. hrs.
This course primarily addresses civil-pretrial practice in federal court. General subject areas include the most common application of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Local Rules for the Northern and Southern Districts of Mississippi. Instruction will take the student from the initial phases of a case through the jury selection process. Classes will be a mix of lectures and hands-on practice, including participation in case management conferences, pretrial conferences, and voir dire.
692 Federal Pre-Trial Practice (Civil)2 sem. hrs.
This course primarily addresses civil-pretrial practice in federal court. General subject areas include the most common application of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Local Rules for the Northern and Southern Districts of Mississippi. Instruction will take the student from the initial phases of a case through the jury selection process. Classes will be a mix of lectures and hands-on practice, including participation in case management conferences, pretrial conferences, and voir dire.
693 Construction Law
A study of the unique legal principles and concepts that arise in a construction project. Coverage includes the roles and responsibility of various participants in the construction process including owners, architects/engineers, contractors, subcontractors, and sureties. The course will focus on issues related to contracting, financing, site safety, and statutory/ common law remedies available to the various participants
701 International Human Rights3 sem. hrs.
This is an introductory survey course on international human rights law and theory. The course will begin by analyzing the concept of human rights and its philosophical underpinnings. It will then look at the historical antecedents and current sources of international human rights law. The course will also consider global, regional, and national organizations and mechanisms for the protection of human rights.
702 Estate, Gift and Generation-Skipping Taxation3 sem. hrs.
An introductory study of the federal estate, gift and generation-skipping transfer tax concepts.
703 Judicial Administration3 sem. hrs.
A study of the system from which justice is sought, social issues affected by court actions, alternative dispute resolution, judicial selection, tenure and discipline, modernizing methods for efficiency and administration of the courts, field surveys, research and analysis.
705 International Law3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces students to fundamental principles of international law, as well as other selected topics traditionally identified as part of public international law. The topics to be covered include the traditional theories, concepts, and sources of international law; the role of international law in the United States; international dispute resolution; statehood and international and regional entities, including the United Nations; principles of jurisdiction; the act of state doctrine and foreign sovereign immunity; and international human rights.
706 International Business Transactions2-3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces students to fundamental international business law principles and concepts. The course will provide a general overview of how international business contracts are formed and performed. International trade organizations and agreements will also be covered, such as the World Trade Organization, regional trade agreements (e.g., NAFTA), and international trade conventions. Domestic laws (primarily U.S.) governing international business transactions also will be discussed, including those involving trade embargoes, import and export controls, anti-bribery laws, and foreign investment controls.
707 Civil Law Obligations3 sem. hrs.
This course deals with the general principles of civil law applicable to contracts including their classification, formation, effects, extinction, and remedies for nonperformance. The course includes comparisons to common law contracts.
708 Civil Law of Persons and Family3 sem. hrs
This course covers the Louisiana law of persons and family, including domicile, marriage, separation, divorce, filiation, parental authority and obligations, custody, tutorship, emancipation, interdiction, and other familial rights and obligations.
709 Civil Law of Successions and Donations3 sem. hrs.
This course treats the civilian approach to the transfer of property by inheritance or by testament and the transfer of property by gifts during life.
710 Securities Regulation3 sem. hrs.
A study of laws relating to creation, issuance, ownership and transfer of securities, including problems of the issuer, investor and control agencies and institutions; securities markets and exchanges; duties and liabilities of dealers, brokers, underwriters and sellers; control persons; the Securities and Exchange Commission and its functions; and so-called ?blue-sky? laws.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
711 Civil Law Property3 sem. hrs.
This course covers fundamental concepts of civil law property. Topics include things, ownership, usufruct, servitudes, boundaries, occupancy, possession and prescription. The course includes comparisons to common law property.
712 Admiralty2-3 sem. hrs.
A study of the basic law of the sea, with primary emphasis on the pertinent federal rules, principles and statutes, including vessel liens, mortgages, shipping documents, insurance, salvage, collision liability, seafarer's rights in injury or death, maritime jurisdiction, constitutional considerations, and special international maritime transactions.
713 Louisiana Security Devices3 sem. hrs.
This course covers the provisions of the Louisiana Civil Code and statutes relating to suretyship, pledge, creditors' privileges, mortgages, chattel mortgages, deposit and sequestration.
714 Business Planning3 sem. hrs.
A study of the organization and conduct of business in partnership,corporate, and hybrid forms. Students are called upon to analyze situations and assess alternative methods. Includes organization of new businesses, and the purchase and sale of a business. The tax ramifications of these transactions will also be included.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619) and Federal Taxation Law (LAW 638).
715 Legislation2-3 sem. hrs.
A study of the legislative process, the interrelationships of the separate branches of government, lobbying, judge-made law, statutory construction, use and analysis of legislative materials and resources, legislative drafting techniques and procedures, including a skills component.
716 Children in the Legal System3 sem. hrs.
This course examines the status of children in society and under the law primarily by examining the relationship between children, their parents and the state. Issues such as corporal punishment in schools, free speech, compulsory school attendance, minors? abortions, traditional juvenile justice materials, child custody and dependency, neglect and abuse are addressed.
717 Louisiana Civil Procedure3 sem. hrs.
This course is a survey of Louisiana civil procedure. The course examines the Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure and covers jurisdiction, venue, judicial power and authority, court officers, actions, parties, pleadings, citation and service of process, discovery, trial judgments, post-trial modification of judgments, appellate procedure, execution of judgments, summary and executory proceedings, probate procedure, and special proceedings.
718 Civil Law Matrimonial Regimes2 sem. hrs.
This course examines the law governing ownership and management of property of married persons in Louisiana. The course includes the examination of the rights and obligations between spouses under legal and contractual matrimonial regimes provided in Louisiana law; the creation, modification, and dissolution of matrimonial regimes; classification of property as community or separate; and the rights of third persons with respect to property of married persons. Comparisons to the laws of other jurisdictions will be considered as well.
719 International Commercial Arbitration Seminar2-3 sem. hrs
This course will examine the basics of the law of international commercial arbitration. Specifically, the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration as a means of international dispute resolution will be discussed, including issues related to the proper drafting of arbitration agreements, questions of arbitrability, as well as the rendering, recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards under international conventions and the laws of the United States. Special attention will be given to the rules and practice of the leading international arbitration institutions, such as the International Court of Arbitration of the ICC, the London Court of International Arbitration, the American Arbitration Association, the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, and the ICSID, as well as the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules and the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration. There will be classroom discussions and simulations on various issues arising in international commercial arbitration. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
720 Antitrust3 sem. hrs.
The law and economics of cartels and exclusionary business practices. The course focuses on sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Act and sections 3 and 7 of the Clayton Act. The practices considered include price-fixing, territorial allocation schemes, mergers, monopolization, boycotts, tying arrangements, and vertical integration. Students are expected to master some elementary methods of economic analysis, but no background in economics is required.
721 Introduction to Intellectual Property3 sem. hrs.
This survey course examines the protection of proprietary rights in inventions, literary works and other forms of creative expression, software, trade secrets, trade designations, and other intangible intellectual products. Students in this course will analyze federal patent, copyright, trademark and unfair competition law, and state trade secrecy and unfair competition laws. This course will also evaluate the challenges posed for traditional intellectual property paradigms by new technologies and the shift to an information-based economy. Students with a general interest in intellectual property as well as students with a specialized interest in patent, copyright, and trademark laws may take this course.
722 Copyright3 sem. hrs.
An in-depth study of the federal law of intellectual property relating to Copyright. The doctrine of federal preemption of state law and relevant international protocol are also covered.
723 Trademarks and Unfair Competition3 sem. hrs.
A study of the law of trademarks, unfair competition, trade secrets, the right of publicity, protection of ideas and related business torts. Emphasis is given to study of the Lanham Act and related state statutory and common law doctrines governing this area of intellectual property.
724 Patent Law3 sem. hrs.
This course covers core concepts of patent law under U.S. patent laws and international conventions for the protection of patents. This course will introduce students to the law and policies surrounding the protection of inventions in the useful arts as well as trade secrets and idea protection through contracts and confidentiality agreements. Students will consider the importance of patents in competitive market economies, industrial use of cross-licenses and patent pools, use of restrictive licenses and government patent buy-outs. Students will study legal principles of novelty, nonobviousness, utility, infringement and remedies under patent law and policy analysis of the patent system in general. There are no prerequisites for this course, and no technical background is required.
725 Advanced Copyright Law3 sem. hrs.
This course evaluates the copyright system as a legal institution to promo the scientific and artistic progress within society, and considers whether copyright laws passed by Congress and interpreted by the courts achieves this fundamental Constitutional goal. This course will study the historical background to the copyright system, its economic foundations, and the social, cultural and industrial impacts of the copyright system as it aims to facilitate the development of knowledge and information in society. Students will be encouraged to critically examine the copyright system as a legally constructed tool to address ideas of authorship, creativity, private property rights, the public domain, and the protection of literary and artistic works. The course will also look at the effect technological changes have had, and will have, on the law, copyright markets, and the creative content industries. Course requirements are a written paper and class room presentation at the end of the semester. There are no prerequisites to have taken copyright law for this course. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement. ?
726 Criminal Law - International and Comparative Perspectives2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to the fields of International Criminal Law and Comparative Criminal Law. Additionally, it will look for commonalities of jurisprudence among international and domestic systems of criminal law. Grades will be based upon a single comprehensive final exam.
727 Complex Litigation *2 sem. hrs.
This is an advanced civil procedure course dealing with the special problems that arise in litigation involving multiple claims and multiple parties, including permissive and compulsory joinder, intervention, disposition of duplicative or related litigation, class actions, discovery in large cases, judicial control of complex litigation, and preclusion issues.
728 Civil Rights3 sem. hrs.
An examination of civil rights legislation,especially Reconstruction era acts, 42 U.S.C.section 1983 and the Court's interpretations. The course focuses on litigation to enforce civil rights, and considers remedies, defenses, immunities, damages and rights to attorney fees. The course also examines one or more historical civil rights movements and any continuing relevancy to current civil rights movements.
729 Selected Problems in Legal History2 sem. hrs.
Selected themes in American legal history with reference to English beginnings. The course involves selective problems such as the growth of constitutional law, the development of court systems, and 19th and 20th century reforms. Illustrative problems involve marriage and family, crime and punishment, relations between church and state, rights of children, and rights of the mentally disabled. As an alternative to this thematic approach, students may be assigned readings relating to the United States Supreme Court and parallel state judicial activities.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
730 Jurisprudence2-3 sem. hrs.
This course addresses issues concerning to the nature of law and its foundations. Is law based on morality or economic efficiency? Is law just a form of politics relating to class, race, or gender? Students will be introduced to the answers to these questions posed by the major schools of jurisprudence including natural law theory, legal positivism, legal realism, law and economics, critical legal studies, feminist legal theory, critical race theory, and postmodern legal theory. When taught as a study abroad course, the course will have a comparative focus, including the study of jurisprudential principles of Confucianism (Asian Law), Tribal Law, and Shari’a Law (Islamic Law). Students will explore the formative relationship between the history and culture and the legal philosophy associated with each of these traditions of jurisprudence.
731 Constitutional Law Seminar2-3 sem. hrs.
An in-depth treatment of contemporary constitutional issues relevant to a modern society.
732 Law and Literature2-3 sem. hrs.
Analysis of selected literary works to examine such issues as the nature and existence of justice, in the abstract, and the pursuit of justice by lawyers in regard to contemporary societal problems.
733 Seminar in American Legal History3 sem. hrs.
This seminar will explore the ways in which the law has influenced the course of American history and the impact of historical events and trends on legal development in the United States. Students will be introduced to a variety of methodological approaches employed by legal historians and will think critically about how law shapes and is shaped by changing social reality. Topics will include the close relationship between law and society in the Salem Witch Trials, the origins of judicial review, the law of slavery, the legal aspects of the American Civil War, changing conceptions of marriage in the United States, the rise of legal realism and the demise of legal formalism, expansion of federal government power during the New Deal, the rights revolution in the twentieth century, and the legal battle against segregation. Class meetings will consist primarily of discussion of reading assignments, which will be drawn from both primary and secondary sources. Students will write several reaction papers based on the readings for the class.
734 Government Contracting1-2 sem. hrs.
This survey course will cover the powers and limitations on government instrumentalities entering into contracts. The course will examine the statutory basis of the government contracting process at the Federal and State levels, including regulations, executive orders and sovereign immunity. Students will gain a basic understanding of public procurement methods, including the stages of requirements determination, solicitation, contract awarding, contract administration, dispute resolution and claims. In addition, the course will introduce students to concepts unique to government contracting, such as the right of termination for the convenience of the government. There will be classroom discussions on how to advise government contracting officers in awarding contracts and on how to advise private sector businesses seeking government contracts.
735 Civil Law Sales and Leases3 sem. hrs.
This course examines provisions of the Louisiana Civil Code and statutes dealing with sales, leases and related contracts.
736 Louisiana Mineral Law2-3 sem. hrs.
? This course involves the study of?mineral?law?in Louisiana, including such topics as ownership of mineral?rights, sales and reservations of?mineral?rights,?mineral?servitudes and leases, and unitization. Topics may also include other contracts pertaining to exploration, development, and production of?minerals, and conservation?laws?and regulations governing?minerals. Particular emphasis will be given to the Louisiana?Mineral?Code.
737 Mental Health Law2 sem. hrs.
738 International and Comparative Competition Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course analyses compares competition/antitrust law regimes in the USA and the European Union.? The course will include analysis of legal and economic concepts of competition and a comparative examination of specific issues and selected significant areas of competition/antitrust law.? Areas of study may include prohibiting agreements or practices that restrict free trading and competition between businesses, banning abusive behavior by a firm dominating a market, or anti-competitive practices that tend to lead to such a dominant position and supervising the mergers and acquisitions of large corporations.
739 International and Comparative Contracts and Sales Law2 sem. hrs.
This course examines both the civil law approach to contracts in comparison to American contracts law, with a focus on?sales?law, and the laws governing?international?sales. Topics will include an introduction to?sales?in civil law jurisdictions, the United Nations?Sales?Convention (CSIG), UNIDROIT "Principles," choice of law applicable to?international?sales?contracts, the formation of?international?sales?contracts, performance of?international?sales?contracts,?and remedies (non-judicial and judicial).
741 Litigation Technology2 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to integrate technology into trial presentations. Students will learn how to apply principles of persuasion to the creation of courtroom visuals. The course will cover the preparation and effective use of electronic illustrative aids and demonstrative exhibits in trial.

Prerequisite: Trial Practice (LAW 681)
742 Electronically Stored Information (ESI) and E-Discovery1-2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on discovery of electronic information that is generated and stored in complex systems. Requests for, and disputes arising from, the preservation and production of electronic information have become common in the Federal civil justice system and in the Federal criminal justice system as well as in State courts. The course will introduce the student to how Federal and State courts address discovery of electronic information. The course will also examine issues arising from the confidentiality of electronic information, the ethical duties of attorneys with regard to that information, and the presentation of evidence in electronic format.? The material will be tested with a final examination. ?
747 Professional Responsibility and Ethics3 sem. hrs.
A problem/case approach to studying the ethical decisions facing the practicing attorney, with an emphasis on the goals, structure and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the Code of Judicial Conduct. Incorporated in the course is participation by the bench and bar.
748 Agricultural Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an introduction to the particular legal issues related to agriculture in today's society.? Topics will include:? regulation by the USDA, labor law as it relates to farms, tort liability of farmers, agricultural co-ops, land partition, Articles 2 and 9 of the UCC?as they relate to agriculture, international trade regulation, food safety, biotechnology related to agriculture, and water and land resource issues.
749 Conflict of Laws3 sem. hrs.
A comprehensive study of the body of law that applies to legal relationships and disputes that have connections to more than one state or country. This course focuses on the main approaches to choice of law (the law that courts apply in disputes where more than one law might apply), constitutional issues related to choice of law, and enforcement of judgments.
750 Media Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on the media's ability to gain access to information from meetings of public bodies (aka "Sunshine Laws"), the defamation standards that apply to media publishing, the extent to which members of the media are able to keep their sources confidential (aka "reporters privilege"), privacy rights of people involved in media reporting, requirements and procedures that must be followed to close a court proceeding and/or court records, and the rules involving the modern phenomena of allowing the public to comment anonymously by electronic means on media stories.
751 Church and State in the Modern World2 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to be an intensive, short-form class that focuses on modern, cutting edge issues of religious liberty in the United States and abroad. Its principal focus is on the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment, focusing on recent disputes in a number of areas: the regulation of religious practice, the funding of religious institutions, government endorsement of religious messages, and the appropriateness of religion in politics. The class also covers some cases and controversies from abroad, particularly in how they compare with issues in the United States.
752 Consumer Bankruptcy2 sem. hrs.
This course will concentrate on Chapters 7 and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code, and focus on the unique issues which arise when an individual with primarily consumer debts files for bankruptcy, including consideration of such topics as the conflicting principles of fresh start vs. maximum return to creditors; good faith and substantial abuse; the automatic stay; property of the estate; exemptions and the discharge of debts; Chapter 13 plans; serial Chapter 13 filings, and conversion of cases from one chapter of the Bankruptcy Code to another. Grades are based upon a final examination.
753 Bankruptcy3 sem. hrs.
This course will provide a comprehensive survey of basic bankruptcy law. The course will focus primarily on consumer bankruptcy and introduce business bankruptcy. The course will touch on the economic, political, and ethical issues underlying bankruptcy's competing goals: providing overextended consumer and business debtors with a fresh start and satisfying creditors' claims in an orderly, fair way.

Corequisite: Secured Transactions and Creditors? Rights (LAW 621).
754 Consumer Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will consider a number of statutory and common law regulations and remedies providing for the protection of consumers, with emphasis on topics not otherwise covered in the law school curriculum. Coverage may include fraud and deceptive sales practices, remedies, fair access to credit, truth in lending, usury, debt collection, and credit reporting regulation.
755 Administrative Law3 sem. hrs.
A study of the basic principles of administrative law, including primary jurisdiction, exhaustion, ripeness, scope of review, and the decision-making process.
756 Law & Morality Seminar3 sem. hrs.
The course begins with a survey of the principal competing Western moral theories and debates concerning the nature and source of moral rights and duties. Students will then be introduced to different problems concerning intersections of law and morality: Is an unjust ?law? really a law? Should all moral wrongs be illegal? Should the law impose a duty to save or help others in emergencies? How should morality inform the law concerning issues of life (e.g., abortion) and death (e.g., euthanasia)? Should judges decide cases based on their moral convictions? What are the moral aims and limits of criminal punishment? Do we have a moral obligation to obey the law? When are civil disobedience and conscientious objection justified? The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
757 Juvenile Legal Issues Seminar3 sem. hrs.
This seminar examines issues that affect minors ? from the very young to older teenagers. In a participatory seminar format, it includes the adoption process to include adoptions from overseas locations; the termination of parental rights and the basis for such court action both in youth court and in chancery court; issues involving children while in a school setting to include truancy; the resolution of criminal issues involving children to include the use of youth court, drug court and teen court; and issues surrounding child custody and child support of children. The required paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
758 Local Government Law3 sem. hrs.
This course examines the legal and political relationships that govern the provision of goods and services by local governments. The specific topics covered include the sources of local government power, incorporation and annexation, home rule, racial and economic implications of local policy, state pre-emption of local ordinances, conflicts between cities and suburbs, property taxation, user fees, municipal finance, and citizen participation in government.
760 Negotiation Seminar2 sem. hrs.
Introduction to principles and techniques in the areas of negotiation, interviewing and client counseling with emphasis on application of these interactive skills to problems confronting lawyers in their daily practice.
762 Seminar2-3 sem. hrs.
Small classes designed to focus on a specific area of the law selected by the professor. A paper is required in lieu of an examination. The seminar is the primary method of satisfying the writing requirement. Specific seminar offerings will be designated in the registration materials each semester.
763 Gender and the Law Seminar2-3 sem. hrs.
This seminar includes both a historic review of the role of women as determined by the law and a modern survey of changing roles of women as citizens, employees, litigants, lawyers, judges, wives, and mothers. Readings are assigned in the writings of legal scholars, in cases, and in statutes to demonstrate how the law views women in the workplace, women and the family, women and their bodies, women and education, and women and political power. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
764 Law and Religion Seminar3 sem. hrs.
This seminar will introduce students to the central issues and theorists in the current debate regarding the relationship between law and religion in a pluralistic democratic society. In particular, the course will concentrate on a question that has received less attention in this debate: What, if any, is the role of religious beliefs in judicial decision making? In addition to analyzing these issues from the perspective of the religion clauses of First Amendment of the United States Constitution, these issues will be engaged more broadly from the perspectives of jurisprudence (philosophy of law), historical analysis, social theory, and political theory. These various perspectives will provide an opportunity to analyze the relationship between law and religion from a broad standpoint and will provide a framework for unpacking the presuppositions about law and religion that different theorists bring to this debate. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
765 Legal Theory Seminar *3 sem. hrs.
This seminar explores classical and contemporary issues in legal theory. What makes a law legitimate? Is law based on morality or is it a matter of social convention or politics? Should judges rely on the law or extra-legal norms for deciding hard cases? Readings will vary from year to year. Some years the emphasis will be on earlier theorists such as Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Kant, Bentham, Llewellyn, etc. Other years will focus on contemporary theorists such as Ronald Dworkin, Richard Posner, Joseph Raz, Catharine MacKinnon, Robin West, Roberto Unger, and John Finnis. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.

Note:This course has not been offered in the last three years. We have kept it in the catalog after a faculty review because we have plans to offer it in the next two years.
767 Race and the Law3 sem. hrs.
This seminar includes both a historic study of race and the law and a consideration of contemporary topics in the area. The study and discussion of these topics are facilitated by using both traditional legal resources and non-traditional resources, such as slave narratives, excerpts from writings during the Reconstruction era, and readings from the civil rights era. Students prepare a paper in this course and present their work to the class. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
768 Seminar on Issues of Criminal Law and Procedure3 sem. hrs.
Students may pick their own topic relating to criminal law or procedure. They may also choose to participate in the Mississippi Criminal Law Reform project, in which case, they will be assigned a research project that will be used by the Judicial Advisory Committee to recommend changes in the penal code. All students will be required to produce at least a 20 page paper that will satisfy the writing requirement and present two oral reports on the subject of the paper.
770 Legal Extern Program3 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for- profit organization, or a government agency. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for two non-classroom credit hours.)

Prerequisite: Students must complete 45 semester hours in order to enroll in Legal Extern Program 770.
771 Legal Extern Program II3 sem. hrs.
See Legal Extern Program LAW 770 for description. Legal Extern Program II is the designated course for those students who take a second local externship for credit. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for two non-classroom credit hours.)
772 Remote Legal Extern Program I3 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for-profit office, or a government agency located outside the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component which will be fulfilled through distance learning. Students who take this course may not take Legal Extern Program II LAW 771 or Remote Legal Extern Program II LAW 776. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for two non-classroom credit hours.)

Prerequisite: Students must complete 45 semester hours in order to enroll in Legal Extern Program 772.
773 Faith and the Practice of the Law2 sem. hrs.
This seminar will explore issues dealing with the relationship between the lawyer's religious faith and the practice of law. Consideration will be given to the intersection between the demands of the modern law practice and the lawyer's faith and values, and whether one can and how one can practice law in a manner consistent with one's faith and values. A variety of readings dealing with how one's faith perspective impacts one's practice will be used in the course. Students will complete a paper on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. This seminar does not satisfy the writing requirement.
774 Law and Economics Seminar2 sem. hrs.
This course draws from various areas of the common law - property, contract, tort and criminal ? to examine economic theory as it applies to various legal problems. The economic analysis of law is a strong analytical tool for legal reasoning; students in this course will be encouraged to apply economic concepts to deepen their understanding of how the legal system as an institution functions in society. This course will also cover public regulation of the market, income and wealth distribution, the legal process, and the Constitution and the federal system. A background in economics is not a prerequisite.
775 Cyberlaw Seminar3 sem. hrs.
This course studies different aspects of the law that applies to the Internet and to the underlying software technologies forming networks to connect society, cultures and businesses in the real world. Students will have the opportunity to examine timely legal issues that pertain to emerging industries, cultures and communities, which are connected through a digital medium of online networks and virtual societies in cyberspace and the Internet. The course will examine the protection of underlying software technologies, the governance of transactions over the Internet, and the interaction and relationships among individuals and communities in the virtual world. The course will also look at tools and mechanisms that are available for private ordering of rights and self-regulation that are not available in real space and time. Course requirements are a written paper and class room presentation at the end of the semester. There are no technical prerequisites for the course. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
776 Remote Legal Extern Program II5 or 6 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for-profit office, or a government agency located outside the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component which will be fulfilled through distance learning. Students who take this course may not take Legal Extern Program LAW 770, Legal Extern Program II LAW 771 or Remote Legal Extern Program I LAW 772. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for four non-classroom credit hours.)

Prerequisite: Students must complete 45 semester hours in order to enroll in Legal Extern Program 776.
778 Regulated Industries2 sem. hrs.
This course will survey regulated industries and activities to examine the regulatory framework under which they operate and will study how governing regulations are formulated and administered. The regulated industries that will be examined may include insurance, gaming, healthcare, banking & finance, corporations & securities, and various regulated professions. This course does not satisfy the writing requirement.
779 Local Government Practice: Land Development Process2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an in-depth examination of the inner workings of local governments and the parties that interact with local governments as they seek to develop land. It will review both legal requirements and strategic considerations for all of the various entities involved (i.e. public bodies, corporate authorities, developers). The course will use role-play as the class will mimic the chambers of a public body. The students will take on the roles of private parties and public officials as businesses appeal to the public bodies and make their requests for assistance or permission to develop their projects. This course is designed for students with an interest in real estate development, government advisory work, and public finance. It will focus on the practical aspects of representing local governments as well as representing those who appear before, or seek relief from, local governments.
780 Basic Real Estate Transactions3 sem. hrs.
This course serves as an introduction to contractual, priority of right, and title assurance issues involved with transferring real estate. The course will cover the life cycle of a residential real estate purchase from the pre-contract period through closing. Course material includes an introduction to residential real estate markets and professionals, the title system, mortgages and deeds of trust, foreclosures, land contracts, liens, ownership forms, residential loan closings, and an introduction to selected basic commercial real estate issues.
781 Real Estate Finance and Development2 sem. hrs.
Commercial real estate transactions including real estate brokerage, execution and breach of real estate contracts, usury, condominiums and cooperatives, sale-leaseback financing, shopping center leases and development, ground leases and mortgages, federal income tax aspects of real estate development.
782 Real Estate Practice2 sem. hrs.
This is a practical study in land title examination, certification and curative work. Course material includes mortgages and deeds of trust, foreclosures, land contracts, liens, ownership forms, residential loan closings, and an introduction to oil and gas title opinion drafting and title litigation.
783 Status of Forces Agreements Seminar1-2 sem. hrs.
This seminar will focus on the international agreements used when the United States stations its forces in another country. Students will examine how these agreements are administered using the Status of Forces Agreements negotiated with Germany and Korea as the primary teaching vehicles. The seminar will examine how signatories work within the agreements to satisfy the needs of each signatory and how they adapt the agreements to deal with changed circumstances and conditions to avoid renegotiation of the agreements.
785 Drafting for Business Transactions2 sem. hrs.
A study of the fundamentals of legal drafting in the context of transactional practice, utilizing exercises in drafting a variety of legal instruments for business transactions.
786 Mississippi Practice3 sem. hrs.
A study of practice in Mississippi Circuit, County and Chancery Courts, from the commencement of the action through final judgment and execution. The course will emphasize the differences in practice and procedure in County, Chancery and Circuit Courts. Court jurisdiction and competence, equitable remedies and the special powers of the Chancery Court are studied, as is enforcement of judgments. The scope and substance of the Mississippi Rules of Civil Procedure and of Evidence are considered, particularly in areas where those rules differ from rules applicable to practice in federal courts.
789 Law Office Management2 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to expose the prospective practitioner to the economic realities of the practice of law. Covered in the course are such matters as the location of the law office, the economical furnishing thereof, the position of the attorney in the office with respect to opening practice, the purchase of law books, office equipment, bookkeeping and accounting, client relations, and other associated subjects.
790 Special Projects I1 sem. hr.
This program is designed to allow students to pursue legal studies outside the structure of the prescribed curriculum under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The student may be involved in a designated project, a tutorial, or other independent research. Whether a written project is required is subject to the discretion of the supervising faculty member, but in any event an accountability exercise is required. Before registering for this course, a student is required to prepare a description of the project and obtain permission of the supervising faculty member and the dean.
790 Special Projects IA1 sem. hr.
Same as LAW 790, but graded on a pass/fail basis. Whether a student enrolls in this course or LAW 790 is within the discretion of the supervising faculty member, and the election must be made at the time the student registers for the course.
791 Special Projects II2 sem. hrs.
Same as LAW 790 but requiring substantially more work.
791 Special Projects IIA2 sem. hrs.
Same as LAW 791 but graded on a pass/fail basis. Whether a student enrolls in this course or LAW 791 is within the discretion of the supervising faculty member, and the election must be made at the time the student registers for the course.
794 Electronic Research Seminar2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on the effective use of the Internet for legal research. Students will learn when to use the Internet for research, how to evaluate sites and content, what resources are available on the Internet, and how to formulate effective search strategies. Because students will receive hands-on training in the Library computer lab, enrollment is limited to fifteen students. Grading will be based on research assignments, class participation and a short paper (10-15 pages) that critically evaluates electronic legal resources in a selected subject area. This seminar will satisfy the writing requirement if the student chooses to write a paper that conforms to the catalog requirements.
795 Writing Requirement2 sem. hrs.
This course is open to students who have completed the first-year curriculum and need to fulfill the advanced writing requirement as described under the Required Courses after the First Year section of this catalog. The program requires in-depth individual study and research of selected topics under the supervision of a full-time member of the faculty culminating in a paper of high quality. Before registering for this course, the student shall identify the topic to be researched and gain prior approval of supervising faculty member. At the conclusion of the semester, the student must attach an abstract of his paper to his instrument of certification. Special permission from the dean is required.
797 Advanced Legal Research and Writing3 sem. hrs.
An intensive study of advanced legal research methods and how those methods support scholarly writing. Special emphasis is given to research in legislative and administrative materials. Competency in research and writing skills is demonstrated through a substantial and comprehensive research project culminating in a paper of high quality.
798 Advanced Legal Analysis3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to help students review important legal concepts in bar-related subjects and to build on analytical, writing, and organizational skills necessary for the bar exam. While the most intense preparation for the bar exam occurs during the weeks immediately prior to the examination, this course will prepare students for that period of study.

Note:Although designed to assist students with bar examination preparation, this course is not considered a substitute for the comprehensive commercial bar review courses.
901 Academic Legal Writing for Foreign Lawyers2 sem. hrs.
This 3 credit summer course is required for all LL.M. students. Enrollment is limited to foreign post-graduate students. The goal of the course is to teach students U.S. legal terminology and English composition skills in order to enable them to write correctly within U.S. legal studies, the U.S. work place or when representing a U.S. client in their home countries. Students submit article or case summaries twice weekly, allowing them to improve their writing skills. The summaries will be discussed in small groups. There will be an exam at the end of the course and before the start of the fall semester. Students must earn at least a ?C? grade to pass. Passing is a condition for fall and spring course registration and enrollment.
902 Introduction to American Law2 sem. hrs.
This 3 credit summer course is required for all LL.M. students. Enrollment is limited to foreign post-graduate students. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of the American legal system, the development and structure. It will provide an introduction to Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, torts, LAW?573?-?Property, contracts and business law, civil procedure, Evidence, Criminal Procedure and LAW 755. Students may be called upon and will have to prepare a paper, which they will present. The final exam is a 24 hour take-home exam at the end of the course and before the start of the fall semester. Students must earn at least a ?C? grade to pass. Passing is a condition for fall and spring course registration and enrollment.
903 American Legal System I1 sem. hr.
This course builds upon Introduction to American Law and focuses on using American case law, statutes and regulations to increase students? understanding of core concepts in American law, such as Federalism, precedent and analogical reasoning. Enrollment is limited to foreign LL.M. students.
904 American Legal System II1 sem. hr.
This course builds upon the greater understanding of core American legal concepts achieved in American Legal System I. In American Legal System II, students will continue to develop their ability to identify and analyze precedent and use advanced analogical reasoning, evaluate the primary schools of American jurisprudence and develop basic advocacy skills. Enrollment is limited to foreign LL.M. students.
920 Masters Level Course in Trial Advocacy or Appellate Advocacy3 sem. hrs.
The best way to hone skills is to practice them, model them and teach them to others. The Master Level Trial Advocacy Course and the Masters Level Appellate Advocacy Course provide the perfect opportunity for students in the Advocacy LL.M. to do just that. In this course, 1-2 students will work with the supervising professor to prepare course exercises for either Trial Advocacy or Legal Writing III (Appellate Advocacy). They will model the various courtroom skills for students. They will also be trained in how to evaluate and critique courtroom performances and will provide one on one counseling to JD students to improve their performances (under the supervision of the professor). Throughout the course, the student will assemble a portfolio of the lessons they created/edited, a video portfolio of their model performances and multiple reflection essays. Grading will be based on their actions in the classroom as well as their portfolio.
995 LL.M. Thesis Course0 sem. hrs.
Foreign LL.M. students may enroll in this course to revise their completed writing requirement into a thesis. As a prerequisite for this course, the professor who supervises the student?s writing requirement must have determined that the paper is of high enough quality to be revised into a thesis. In addition, the Director of the LL.M. Program must approve the student?s enrollment in this course. The Director or the LL.M. Program is responsible for supervising revision of the writing requirement, but both the Director and the original faculty member who supervised the student?s writing requirement must approve the final document being labeled as a thesis. The title of the thesis will be listed on the student?s transcript. The law school will retain a copy of each document that is successfully designated an LL.M. Thesis. ?

Prerequisite: ?1) This course is restricted to foreign LL.M. students. 2) A foreign LL.M. student wishing to enroll in this course must have completed the minimum 2-credit writing requirement as part of a seminar or special project. 3) The faculty member who supervises the student?s writing requirement must determine that the paper is of high enough quality that it can be revised into a thesis. 4) The Director of the LL.M. Program must approve the student?s enrollment in this course.