Mississippi College School of Law

Academic Calendar

SUMMER 2016 REGULAR SESSION

   
May 31 (Tuesday) Summer school begins
June 2 (Thursday)

Last Day for enrolling or adding courses
Last day to drop course with 100% tuition only refund

 
June 17 (Friday) Last day to drop a class
August 3 (Wednesday                                                         Last day of class
August 4-5 (Thursday - Friday) Final Exams, Summer School
July 30 (Thursday) Last day of class
July 31-August 1 (Friday-Saturday) Final Exams, Summer School
August 6 (Saturday, 10:00 a.m.) Graduation

SUMMER 2016 STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

   
May 18 - June 10 China/Korea
June 12 - June 27 Germany
June 29 - July 22 France
Drop deadlines for a full tuition refund would be 2 weeks prior to the start date of each summer abroad program.

2016 1L SUMMER ENTRY PROGRAM

   
PROPERTY CLASS June 8 (Wednesday) - July 28 (Thursday)
Final Exam August 1 (Monday)
   
ACADEMIC SUCCESS CLASSES July 5 (Tuesday) - July 29 (Friday)
Final Exam July 30 (Saturday)
   
July 1 (Friday) Independence Day Holiday (no classes)
August 1 - 5 (Monday - Friday) Accelerated Success Workshop

FALL SEMESTER 2016

August 9-12 (Tuesday - Friday) First Year Orientation
August 15 (Monday) Classes Begin
August 22 (Monday) Last Day for adding courses
Last day to drop course with 100% tuition only refund.
September 5 (Monday) Labor Day Holiday, No Classes.  
October 13 – October 14 (Thursday-Friday) Fall Break, No classes
October 28 (Friday) Last day to withdraw from a course
November 21 - 25 (Monday - Friday) THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY
November 30 (Wednesday) Monday/Wednesday/Friday and Friday only classes meet
Last Day of Class
December 1 - 2 (Thursday - Friday) Reading Days
December 5 - 15 (Monday - Saturday, Monday - Thursday) Final Exams
December 16 (Friday, 7:00 p.m.) GRADUATION

SPRING SEMESTER 2017

   
Tuesday, December 27, 2016 - Sunday, January 8, 2017 Merida, Mexico Study Abroad Program
January 2-10 (Monday-Tuesday) Winter Intersession
January 11 (Wednesday) Classes Begin
Monday only classes meet on January 11
Wednesday only classes DO NOT meet
Monday/Wednesday and Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes meet as scheduled
January 16 (Monday) Martin Luther King Holiday (no classes)
January 19 (Thursday) Last day for adding courses
Last day to drop course with 100% tuition only refund
March 11 (Saturday)  - March 18 (Saturday) Cuba Study Abroad Program
March 13 - 17 (Monday - Friday) Spring Break
March 20 (Monday) Classes resume
March 24 (Thursday) Last day to withdraw from a course
April 14 (Friday) Easter Holiday (no classes)
April 27 (Thursday) Last Day of Class
No Tuesday/Thursday only classes meet
Regularly scheduled Friday only and MWF classes meet on Thursday, April 27
April 28 (Friday) Reading Day
May 1-11 (Monday - Saturday, Monday - Thursday) Final Exams
May 13 (Friday, 10:00 a.m.) GRADUATION

General Information

Mission Statement

Mississippi College School of Law seeks to provide a superior legal education within the context of a Christian institution. Our aim is to create an institutional environment that promotes intellectual and practical learning. Our student body and faculty reflect a wide variety of backgrounds and interests. Out of this diversity, we seek to create a scholarly community in which students and faculty discuss issues freely in a variety of settings, both formal and informal.

Our curriculum is designed to train students to become skilled and ethical lawyers capable of adapting their practice to a changing legal world. To accomplish this goal, we have looked to a liberal arts model in shaping the law school's curriculum. Our courses emphasize individual responsibility for learning, while providing every student instruction in the substantive and analytical skills necessary for successful practice.

We provide grounding in the common law and statutory foundations of our legal system, but also explore emerging doctrine, employing in each context the traditional methods of legal analysis, enriched by the insights of related disciplines. To assure that our curriculum incorporates the most current scholarship, our faculty is actively engaged in research in their respective areas of expertise. In addition to courses in legal doctrine, we offer a wide range of instruction in the skills of modern practice. Because we view writing as the most fundamental of these skills, we emphasize teaching of writing at every stage of legal training. In addition, we offer courses in oral advocacy, counseling, negotiation, and the many skills of pretrial and trial advocacy. Because of our location in a major legal center, we are able to draw on leading practitioners and judges as adjunct professors and as supervisors of externship programs.

We recognize the law school's responsibility to the legal community and the larger society. Consequently, the law school and its faculty are involved in a variety of activities to improve the legal system, including research and advocacy in law reform projects, service on bar association committees, and teaching in continuing legal education programs.

All of these goals reflect the commitment of the law school and the founding institution to the belief that human beings are God's creations, equally entitled to dignity and respect. In every setting, we seek to train lawyers of high intellectual and practical ability, who are committed to ethical practice; to assisting the disadvantaged; and to free and open discussion of issues of law, policy, and values.

Accreditation

MC Law is accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA) and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, the International Association of Law Schools, and the American Society of Comparative Law. J.D. graduates are eligible to take the bar exam in all fifty states and the District of Columbia. MC Law is approved by the ABA to offer the LL.M. degree to students holding an academic law degree from a foreign university, but the ABA does not accredit LL.M. programs. LL.M. graduates are eligible to take the bar examination in several states. Interested persons should consult with the bar examining authorities for specific states for eligibility requirements. For further information regarding eligibility for admission to the bar, see the section on Admission to a State Bar in this catalog for further information regarding bar admissions.  The Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar of the American Bar Association may be contacted at 321 North Clark Street, Chicago, IL  60654-7598, telephone, 312-988-6738.

Mississippi College is accredited by The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the bachelor's and master's degrees, education specialist degrees, the education doctorate, and the first professional doctorate in law. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 2033-4097, or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Mississippi College. The Commission is to be contacted only if there is evidence that appears to support the university's significant noncompliance with a requirement or standard.

Statements of Compliance with Federal Education Laws

In compliance with federal law, including provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Mississippi College does not illegally discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, age, disability, or military service in admissions, in the administration of its education policies, programs, and activities or in employment. Under federal law, the University may exercise religious preferences in employment in order to fulfill its mission and purpose.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) (Confidentiality of Student Information)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 is a federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. Students have specific, protected rights regarding the release of such records or information contained therein. Mississippi College will release confidential or personally identifiable information only with the student's written consent and will release information defined as "Directory Information" only in the best interest of the student.

Each year (fall semester) MC Law publishes a law school directory including information on faculty, staff and students. Within the first fifteen calendar days after the beginning of the fall semester, faculty and staff should contact Office of Human Resources, and students should contact the MC Law School Director of Student Records to make changes. Students also should view their Personal Information in Banner Web to assure the accuracy of the information and to determine what changes, if any, should be made in the university's student information system.  Under FERPA, currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of their information if they do not wish to have such information published in the directory. A request to withhold information should be filed in writing with the Director of Student Records within the first fifteen days of the beginning of the fall semester.  Absent a written request to withhold directory information, Mississippi College assumes that the student approves disclosure in the law school directory.  All listings in the law school directory are taken from information contained in the university's computer information system. 

Parents can file a copy of their income tax return with the registrar to establish that their child/student is a dependent for the purpose of receiving grades.  A student may give written permission to the university registrar to release grades to parents.

A law school student who does not wish any information released for any reason may file a written request with the dean of the law school. A confidential notice will be placed on the student's record and this confidential status will remain on their record permanently until a signed release by the student is filed with the dean.

Law students who want access to their education records shall make the request in writing by a USPS mailing. The writing should be signed with an original signature, include a copy of a photo identification card, and include a current return mailing address. 

Any correspondence or requests involving FERPA shall be sent to the Director of Law School Records, Mississippi College School of Law, 151 E. Griffith Street, Jackson, MS 39201. The Director of Law School Records serves as the sole point of contact for FERPA matters.

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the ADA of 1990

In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Mississippi College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in its programs or activities. If students need special accommodations due to learning, physical, psychological, or other disabilities, they should direct their inquiries to the Assistant Dean for Student Services, 151 East Griffith St., Jackson, MS, 39201. 

Title IX Compliance

Mississippi College has completed the self evaluation study required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for men and women and, as such, does not discriminate on the basis of sex in employment or admissions except in those instances which are claimed and exempted under Section 86.12 of the guidelines based on conflict with the religious tenets of the Mississippi Baptist Convention. Official Grievance Procedures have been established and copies may be obtained from and complaints filed with the Office of the President, Box 4001, Telephone: 601.925.3200 or the Vice President for Planning and Assessment, Box 4029, Telephone: 601.925.3225. 

Non-Discrimination and Equality of Opportunity

MC Law does not use admissions policies or take other action to preclude admission of applicants or retention of students on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability.

Academic Facilities

Academic facilities at Mississippi College are designed primarily for use in the education of Mississippi College students; other uses, although quite worthy in themselves, should not be allowed to interfere with that primary purpose.

Admissions Information

J.D. Program Admissions

The faculty annually sets the admissions standards for the Doctor of Jurisprudence program. These standards are primarily based on the undergraduate grade point average, the LSAT score, and personal and/or academic achievements.

An admissions file is acted upon after it is complete, and a candidate is notified shortly thereafter. Applications are received until July 1 or until the class is filled. Candidates are encouraged to complete admissions files as early as possible.

When an applicant is accepted, two deposits are required to secure a place in the class. Applicants will be notified in their acceptance letters of the amount of the deposits and the dates they are due. Upon enrollment, both nonrefundable deposits are credited to the applicant’s tuition.  Students who apply for the early decision program or the two-year program may have earlier deposit due dates as well as students who begin their legal studies in the summer.

As a general rule, a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited, four-year college or university is a prerequisite for admission. However, a limited number of Mississippi College, University of Southern Mississippi, Troy University, and Tougaloo College undergraduates who have demonstrated exceptional academic ability may combine baccalaureate and law school studies to receive a bachelor’s degree and the Doctor of Jurisprudence degree in six years. These students are permitted to spend the senior undergraduate year as full-time law students, accumulating credit toward the undergraduate and law degrees simultaneously. At the end of the first year of successful law study, the undergraduate degree may be awarded; after two additional years of full-time law study the law degree may be awarded. A student desiring such an arrangement with these undergraduate institutions should consult with the undergraduate catalogs at these respective institutions regarding each university's program and requirements for participation.

Executive Program (Part-Time J.D. Program)

MC Law has a part-time degree program for a limited number of entering students. Successful applicants ordinarily have achieved grade point averages and LSAT scores that both fall within the top twenty-five percent (25%) of the grade point averages and LSAT scores of all students in the entering class. Each part-time student must enter intending to earn the degree Doctor of Jurisprudence. The number of students participating in the part-time program in any fall or spring semester shall not exceed ten in any of the first, second, and third year classes. If more than ten applicants for admission in a given class apply for part-time status, those applicants who present the more compelling needs, as judged by the Admissions Committee, shall be admitted to part-time status. Except as otherwise stated in this paragraph, all other requirements with respect to the application process for the Executive Program are the same as for other applicants.

Joint J.D/M.B.A. Degree Program

Mississippi College offers a joint degree program for the Doctor of Jurisprudence and Master of Business Administration degrees. Students must be separately admitted to both the J.D and M.B.A. programs. For more information on the program consult the Degrees Offered section of the Law School Catalog and Joint J.D./M.B.A. section of the Graduate School Catalog

Accelerated J.D. Program (2 years)

A limited number of highly qualified students may be selected for the accelerated two-year J.D. program. These students begin their legal studies in the summer and complete their J.D. requirements in their third summer.

Admission of International Students, J.D. Program

A prospective student who is not a citizen of the United States applying for admission to MC Law’s J.D. Program must make application at least six months prior to the desired date of entrance and submit all required materials three months prior to registration. These are to include a completed application with fee, certified and complete academic records from all secondary schools and universities attended, and documentary evidence showing that adequate financial resources are insured.

International students must otherwise comply with the admissions criteria of the law school. Special provisions related to payment of tuition and fees apply to international students and are contained in the Financial Information Section of this catalog.

Transfer Students

Students from ABA-approved law schools who have completed the first year of law school and are in good academic standing may be considered in any semester for admission with advanced standing. An application for admission with advanced standing should reach the Admissions Office at least six weeks prior to the registration date of the semester. A transcript from the student’s law school must also be provided, as well as a copy of the LSDAS report.

Transfer of credits earned at another law school will be decided on a case by case basis and will depend upon the comparability of the curriculum of the law school from which the student is transferring to that of MC Law. Transfer credits will be accepted only from ABA-accredited law schools. A student transferring to MC Law from another law school may not receive more than 30 hours of credits. An applicant for transfer will be advised as to what transfer credits will be accepted for credit at MC Law.  Transfers are permitted only if space is available. The dean may impose other restrictions in addition to those set forth above. Additional information regarding residency requirements for transfer students are contained in the Academic Information Section of this catalog. Transfer students are not officially ranked.  However, transfer students may request an unofficial class rank from the Director of School Records at the end of each regular semester completed at MC Law.

MC Law does not have an established articulation agreement with any other law school.

Visiting Students

Students from ABA-accredited law schools are eligible to apply to study at Mississippi College School of Law during any semester beyond their first year of study. Visiting students must be in good academic standing and have permission from the dean of their law school to take courses at MC Law.

Admissions for the LL.M. Program for International Lawyers

Applicants must hold an academic degree in law from an educational institution in a country other than the United States and be eligible to become licensed to practice law in that country. However, students requiring additional English language preparation may arrive for the spring semester to attend the Intensive English Language Program (IEP) at Mississippi College. IEP will not grant credit toward the LL.M. degree, but will help ensure students have the requisite English language skills to be successful in the LL.M. program. The university degree in law must have been awarded by an accredited institution and must be earned prior to admission to Mississippi College School of Law. Documentation of all academic degrees and, where applicable, a law license is required.

Applicants for whom English is a second language must have a score of at least 600 on the paper-based TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), a score of at least 250 on the computer based TOEFL, a score of at least 100 on the iBT TOEFL (Internet-Based test), and a score of at least 6.5 on the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). Qualifying language scores must be less than two years old.

Applicants must demonstrate:

  • Academic achievement, documented with official academic transcripts, diplomas and/or graduation certificates and three letters of academic reference
  • Professional accomplishment, where applicable, documented with letters of professional reference
  • English language competency as required by MC Law.

Applicants for the LL.M. Program must complete the application for admission which may be found at http://law.mc.edu/prospective-students/llm/.

LL.M. candidates who meet the academic standards for admission, but who do not, in the determination of the LL.M. Admissions Committee, have sufficient English language skills, may be conditionally accepted to the program. These students must complete the one-year Intensive English Program offered by Mississippi College on the Clinton campus prior to beginning the LL.M. program.

A deposit of $500.00 must be made by accepted LL.M. program applicants within 30 days of acceptance or by May 1, whichever occurs first. The deposit is nonrefundable and will be credited to the applicant's tuition

Academic Information

Dean Approval

When any action is required by the dean, the dean may authorize another member of the faculty or staff to act on the dean's behalf.

Law School Matriculation

Applicants selected for admission normally matriculate in August (fall semester) and attend a mandatory orientation. Some applicants are accepted on the requirement that they matriculate for a summer program. All other accepted applicants have the option of matriculating in the summer to take a designated course from the first-year curriculum. Students who matriculate in this optional program will take a designated course in the spring semester. Students who matriculate in the summer are required to attend the August orientation. A student is considered as having matriculated if enrolled on the first day of classes for the term.  The American Bar Association establishes the matriculation date of students for the purpose of its reports.

LL.M. students matriculate in the summer term.

Class Attendance

Class attendance is required. Emergency absences are handled on an individual basis. Any student whose absences, excused or unexcused, exceed 25 percent of the time allotted for the course will not be allowed to take the final exam and will receive a grade of "F" for that course.

Absences due to illness will be excused by the instructor when a written statement of such fact is presented by the student within a week of the student's return to class. Each unexcused absence in excess of a total of one week of classes for a regular semester, or the equivalent, may reduce the student's final grade. Students should consult the course syllabus regarding rules for unexcused absences in each particular course.

In all cases a student will be held responsible for assignments and other work in the class during the student's absence. The responsibility for work missed rests entirely with the student.

Degrees Offered

Doctor of Jurisprudence

The courses currently required of all candidates for the Doctor of Jurisprudence degree are listed below. Elective courses constitute the remainder of the 90 semester hours.

A required orientation program and a legal writing workshop are held for entering students each fall prior to the beginning of classes. In addition to matters traditionally covered by orientation, these program address topics such as case briefing, introduction to legal method, and professionalism. All entering first-year students, whether matriculating in the summer or fall terms, are required to attend.

Required First Year Courses

First Year - Fall

  • LAW 625 - Civil Procedure I
  • LAW 506 - Contracts I
  • LAW 502 - Torts I
  • LAW 561 - Criminal Law
  • LAW 582 - Legal Writing I
  • LAW 580 - Legal Research I

Total 15 Hours

First Year - Spring

  • LAW 626 - Civil Procedure II
  • LAW 507 - Contracts II
  • LAW 573 - Property *
  • LAW 503 - Torts II
  • LAW 583 - Legal Writing II
  • LAW 581 - Legal Research II

Total 15 Hours

Notes:

* First-year students who enter in the summer and take Property in the summer will choose from among the following courses for the spring semester of the first year in place of Property:  LAW 638 - Federal Taxation Law, LAW 619 - Business Associations I, LAW 623 - Evidence, or LAW 522 - Constitutional Law.  The grade for such replacement course will not be included for purposes of spring ranks nor determining good academic standing after the first year, but will be included thereafter.  See Grades Required for Good Academic Standing section of this catalog.

In addition to required first year courses, first year students are required to participate in Trial Practice courses as jurors, parties, and/or court officials when called upon.

Required Courses after First Year

After completion of the first year of legal studies, students (other than those on the guided curriculum) are required to take LAW 747 - Professional Responsibility and Ethics,  LAW 587 - Legal Writing III , LAW 522 - Constitutional Law, and to satisfy the school's writing requirement.  All students entering in the fall of 2016 and thereafter will also be required to take at least six credits of experiential learning course(s). Qualifying courses will be identified as such in the course descriptions.

With so few required courses, students bear a great responsibility to plan their coursework so that they will be well-grounded in fundamental subjects that are likely to be tested on the bar exam. To assist students in the important task of selecting courses that will adequately prepare them for the bar exam, faculty members advise students and the law school administration provides a list of bar exam topics for the various states.

Writing Requirement

After finishing the first year of the law school program but prior to graduation, each student must complete a substantial and intensive research project under the supervision of a tenured or tenure-track faculty member, the Dean, the Assistant Dean for Information and Technology, a full-time visiting professor, or a director.  The paper must be original and analytical and it must warrant a grade not lower than a C. Superficial or predominantly descriptive writing will not suffice. The writing requirement may be satisfied in one of four ways:

  1. In connection with a seminar or other course in which a paper of high quality which is at least 20 pages in length excluding footnotes is required in lieu of an examination;
  2. In connection with an in-depth individual study and research of a selected topic under the supervision of a full-time faculty member pursuant to LAW 795;
  3. By completion of a significant and highly meritorious law review piece, with approval of and supervision by a faculty member; or
  4. By other substantial writing projects approved by the faculty, including the completion of two papers, each of which are at least 10 pages in length.  Courses fulfilling the writing requirement will be so designated in the registration materials each semester; there is no fixed list of such courses.

Guided Curriculum

Full-time students whose grade point average is below 2.5 at the end of the first semester of their 1L year (excluding summer courses) are required to participate in the course Law 500 – Principles of Legal Analysis in the spring semester of their 1L year.  This course, designed to help first year students further develop legal analysis and writing skills, is graded on a credit/no credit basis.

Full-time students whose grade point average is below 2.5 at the end of the first year of law school are required to participate in the Guided Curriculum. The Guided Curriculum consists of six courses to be taken during the second and third years of law school as a requirement for graduation. Students must take  EvidenceBusiness Associations ICriminal Procedure, Advanced Legal Analysis and two courses from the of the following  group:  Domestic Relations, Wills and Estates, Federal Income Tax, and either Secured Transactions or Sales and Leasing.

Students who are participating in the Civil Law Certificate Program may choose Louisiana Security Devices in place of Secured Transactions, Civil Law of Sales and Leases in place of Sales and Leasing,  Civil Law of Persons and Family in place of Domestic Relations, and Civil Law Successions and Donations in place of Wills and Estates.

Students who plan to take only the Louisiana Bar may, at the discretion of the Associate Dean of Civil Law, take Civil Law of Property in place of Advanced Legal Analysis.

Three of these six courses must be taken in the second year. Students who are required to participate in the Guided Curriculum and who attain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average during the second or third year are no longer required to remain in the Guided Curriculum. The Guided Curriculum requirements reflect the commitment of the MC Law faculty to preparing all students for the bar examination and for practice across a variety of areas of law.

The Guided Curriculum requirements reflect the commitment of the MC Law faculty to preparing students for the bar examination and for practice across a variety of areas of law.

Certificate Programs

MC Law offers certificates for J.D. students in several practice areas, specifically in Business and Commercial Law, Civil Litigation, Criminal Practice, Family and Juvenile Law, Health Care Law, International Law and Solo and Small Law Practice. These certificate programs assist students who have an interest in these practice areas by guiding them in design of their educational program while in law school to prepare them for practice in these particular practice areas. The certificates also provide recognition of academic excellence for students who fulfill the certificate requirements. 

Students must maintain an overall minimum GPA of 3.0 in courses in the certificate program in which they participate to complete the certificate requirements. Additionally, students must earn at least a grade of C+ in any individual course that is counted toward the certificate. Each program consists of specified required courses, designated elective courses and skills courses, a writing requirement, and, in some programs, a minimum number of hours of courtroom observation. The writing requirement in satisfaction of the certificate requirements may also satisfy the writing requirement for the J.D. degree.  Students may earn only one of these certificates in the J.D. program. A student may, however, earn both the Civil Law Certificate (described below) and one of the practice area certificates. Students seeking to earn a certificate in one of the designated practice area must apply for admission to the certificate program with the designated faculty advisor for that program. The designated faculty advisor is identified in the registration materials provided to students each fall and spring semester, or this information may be obtained from the Director of Student Records.

Click the following links for more information about the various certificate programs.

Certificate in Civil Litigation

Certificate in Business and Commercial Law 

Certificate in Criminal Practice 

Certificate in Family and Juvenile Law 

Certificate in International and Comparative Law 

Certificate in Health Law 

Certificate in Civil Law Studies 

Certificate in Solo and Small Law Practice 

Executive Program (Part-Time)

No student who is a part-time student and has eight (8) or more hours remaining before being eligible to graduate shall be permitted to enroll for and take less than eight (8) hours in either the fall or spring semester.  Part-time students must complete the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence within seventy-two (72) months after commencing the program of legal studies unless the Academic Standards Committee grants an exception.  Any exception must comply with ABA Standard 304 as effective at the time of the request.  Subject to the grade point average requirements applicable to students generally, students in the part-time program must enroll and complete classes every fall and spring semester and are encouraged to enroll for the summer semester.  

Part-time students shall be classified as 1L until they have earned at least thirty (30) hours of law school credit, as 2L until they have earned at least sixty (60) hours of law school credit, and as 3L when they have earned at least sixty (60) hours of law school credit.  Part-time students will pay tuition at the rates prescribed for their classifications as determined in accordance with the immediately preceding sentence.  The Academic Standards Committee shall appoint a faculty member who shall serve as faculty advisory for all part-time students and shall approve the schedules of each part-time student.

Except as provided above, part-time students shall be subject to all rules, regulations, requirements, standards, limitations, procedures, discipline, guidelines, and, to the extent not including the foregoing, catalogue provisions applicable to all students who are not part-time students, including GPA standards and limitations resulting from failures to attain or maintain required GPA levels.

Students in the Executive Program are not ranked with full-time students.  However, such students may request an unofficial rank from the Director of Student Records at the end of any regular semester after they have earned at least 30 hours. 

During the first two years of law school, Executive Program students must take at least the following classes: 

First Year - Fall

  • LAW 506 - Contracts I
  • LAW 502 - Torts I
  • LAW 582 - Legal Writing I
  • LAW 580 - Legal Research I

First Year - Spring

  • LAW 507 - Contracts II
  • LAW 503 - Torts II
  • LAW 583 - Legal Writing II
  • LAW 581 - Legal Research II

Second Year - Fall

  • LAW 625 - Civil Procedure I
  • LAW 561 - Criminal Law
  • LAW 601 - Appellate Advocacy

Second Year - Spring

  • LAW 626 - Civil Procedure II
  • LAW 573 - Property*
  • Elective

*If Property is taken during the summer term, another course will be selected with approval of the student's faculty advisor, preferably from Federal Taxation Law (Law 638), Business Associations I (Law 619), Evidence (Law 623), or Constitutional Law (Law 522). 

Accelerated Two-Year J.D. Program

MC Law offers an accelerated two-year JD program at a set price for the entire program. Students must begin the program in the summer and then take courses in the two fall semesters, two spring semesters, the intersession, and two additional summers. The entrance requirements for this program are greater than for the regular JD program due to the demanding nature of the program. Each year MC Law announces the details for the program in its recruiting materials. The Associate Dean for Academics serves as the coordinator for the program. For further information contact the Admissions Office.

Sample Course Schedule (just an example)

Cum Hours

Semester Hours

Period

Course(s)

4

4

Summer

Property

19

15

Fall

Regular Courses

34

15

Spring

Regular Courses + Constitutional Law

44

10

Summer

2 hours May Intersession plus 8 hours over summer

62

18

Fall

Electives plus Legal Writing III and Evidence

66

4

Intersession

Trial Practice

84

18

Spring

Regular Courses

90

6

Summer

6 hour externship following bar exam (or 6 hours of summer courses if not taking July bar)

Master of Laws

Advocacy LL.M.

A hands on, practice based course of study, the Advocacy LL.M. integrates trial and appellate advocacy externships at top State and Federal agencies.  Students can focus on developing their knowledge and skills in civil or criminal advocacy at the trial and/or appellate level.  Perfect for the practicing attorney, students have five years to complete the degree, a variety of scheduling options and all classes also count towards CLE credit.  This is a 24 credit program.  For information about the specific classes under this program, contact meyer@mc.edu.

American Legal Studies LL.M.

This LL.M. Program, designed to help foreign students to qualify and prepare for a US bar examination.  It requires a minimum of (30) credits consisting of a summer term and two semesters in residence at MC Law.

Required Courses:

LAW 901 - Academic Legal Writing for Foreign Lawyers  (2 credits) (Summer Semester)
LAW 902 - Introduction to American Law  (2 credits) (Summer Semester)
LAW 903 - American Legal System I  (1 credit)
LAW 904 - American Legal System II  (1 credit)
LAW 747 - Professional Responsibility and Ethics 

Choose a minimum of nine (9) credits from the following:

LAW 502 - Torts I 
LAW 503 - Torts II 
LAW 625 - Civil Procedure I 
LAW 626 - Civil Procedure II 
LAW 506 - Contracts I 
LAW 507 - Contracts II 
LAW 561 - Criminal Law 
LAW 573 - Property 
LAW 562 - Criminal Procedure 
LAW 623 - Evidence 
LAW 522 - Constitutional Law 

Students are expected to take 13 credits both the fall and the spring semesters.  Students in the program are eligible to transfer to the JD program if they meet certain criterion (2.6 grade point average in a restricted core course curriculum).  Contact the Director to the LL.M. Program at meyer@mc.edu for more information.

International & European Legal Studies LL.M.

This degree involves one semester of study at MC Law and one semester of student at Lille Catholic University in France.

It is a 30 credit program with the credits split evenly between the two schools/semesters.  The program offers both a business and a human rights track.  MC Law JD students may earn an LL.M. from Lille Catholic University in addition to their JD following a single semester at that school.  For more information, see http://law.mc.edu/prospective-students/llm or contact meyer@mc.edu.

Traditional (General) LL.M.

The Traditional LL.M. is a program designed to allow the student to craft their own academic plan, (in conjunction with the Director of the LL.M. Program).

  1. The Master of Laws (General) degree requires a minimum of 24 credits. 
    1. Up to six credits can be recognized for coursework completed at another A.B.A. accredited law school.                                                    
    2. A portion of these credits can be recognized for coursework at MC Law.  Specifically:

      Up to six credits can be recognized for coursework at MC Law earned while the student was successfully completing their Juris Doctor degree at MC Law.

      If an MC Law student in the Master of Laws in American Legal Studies Program elects to transfer to the Master of Laws (General) Program, any credits earned and coursework completed prior to the transfer will be recognized.  
  2. Up to 9 of the 24 credits can be earned for out of classroom education, including:
    1. LAW 790 or LAW 791 Special Research Projects (3 credits maximum)
    2. LAW 795 Writing Requirements (2 credits maximum)
    3. LAW 905 LL.M. Thesis (This course is being developed but it not yet available.)
    4. LAW 770, LAW 771, LAW 772, LAW 776 Legal Extern Programs (6 credits maximum)
  3. If the student does not hold a Juris Doctor (or LL.B.) from an ABA accredited school, then the following are required courses for the Master of Laws (General) degree:
    1. LAW 901 Introduction to American Law (2 credits)
    2. LAW 902 Legal Research & Writing for Foreign Lawyers (2 credits)
    3. Writing Requirement (2 credits)
  4. Contact the Director to the LL.M. Program at meyer@mc.edu for more information.

Joint J.D./M.B.A.

Mississippi College offers a joint degree program for the Juris Doctor and Master of Business Administration degrees. Students must be separately admitted to both the J.D. and M.B.A. programs, and candidates in the joint degree program, in order to receive the J.D. degree, must substantially complete the requirements for the M.B.A degree and complete all of the requirements for the J.D. degree, of which six hours of work required for the J.D. degree may be satisfied by the following Business School classes: Accounting Issues in Business Decisions (ACC 6501) and Policy Formulation and Administration (MGT 6572). Further, nine of the 30 semester hours of course work required for the M.B.A. degree may be satisfied by law school course work. The Law, Business and Society class (three credit-hours) will be satisfied by completion of the following law school classes: Contracts I and Contracts II, Property, and Professional Responsibility and Ethics. The two electives (three credit-hours each) in the M.B.A. curriculum will be satisfied by completing six credit hours of any of the following law classes: Agency, Antitrust, Banking, Business Associations I, Business Associations II, Business Planning, Commercial Paper, Corporate and Partnership Taxation, Bankruptcy, Employment Law, Estate and Gift Taxation, Federal Taxation, Insurance, International Business Transactions, Labor Law, Pension and Employee Benefit Law, Real Estate Finance and Development, Real Estate Transactions, Sales and Leasing, Secured Transactions and Creditors’ Rights, and Securities Regulation.

Students must earn a C or better in all classes for which dual credit may be given. Law school credit for business school classes will not be finally awarded until the student has substantially completed the M.B.A. portion of the joint degree program and has completed all the requirements for the J.D. degree including the six hours of Business School courses. In sum, a law student who has completed all prerequisites to the M.B.A. program could complete the requirements for the two degrees in three and one-half years of full-time study. Students pursuing the joint degree may sequence the law and business classes in almost any way, except that students may not take business school classes during the first year of law school.

The law school and business school each have assigned one faculty member to serve as advisor to the students in the joint degree program regarding course sequencing. Except during the first year of law school, a student may take both law and business classes in the same semester, or take all course work during a given semester in one program or the other. The flexibility in sequencing permits M.B.A. students to enter the joint degree program at any time and law students to enter at any time after the first year of law school.

As currently required for the J.D. degree, students must complete the course work necessary for the law degree within five years. The J.D. degree requires a minimum of five semesters in residence (four for transfer students) at the law school. Residency credit for purposes of the J.D. degree will be awarded proportionately for semesters in which a student takes both J.D. and M.B.A. courses. See the Mississippi College Graduate Catalog for further details and joint degree requirements.

Policy on Awarding Credit

Policy on Awarding Credit (ABA Standard 310)

The American Bar Association standards for accrediting law schools contain a formula for calculating the amount of work necessary to earn one credit hour. ABA Standard 310 defines a “credit hour” as an amount of work that reasonably approximates:

  1. not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and two hours of out-of-class student work per week for fifteen weeks, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
  2. at least an equivalent amount of work as required in subparagraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including simulation, field placement, clinical, co-curricular, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.”

Interpretation 310-1 states that 50 minutes suffices for an hour of classroom instruction, but an “hour” for out-of-class student work is 60 minutes. The Interpretation also includes a final examination week in the 15-week calculation.  All told, you should expect to spend a minimum of 42.5 hours per semester per credit earned.

Courses:

At MC Law a typical class will meet 50 minutes per week, per credit hour for 14 weeks, followed by an exam period.  For instance, a three-credit course will meet 150 minutes per week (three, 50-minute blocks; or two, 75-minute blocks) for 14 weeks followed by a three hour final exam.  The minimum length of the exam will be tied to the 50 minute “in-class” hour and the credits in the course: 3 credits = 150 minutes; 4 credits = 200 minutes; etc., though exams are most often administered as one 60-minute hour per credit.  

You should expect a minimum of two hours of work per week for every fifty minutes in class.  For a three credit course, this would be six hours of out-of-class work attributed to reading, reviewing, outlining, studying, homework assignments, etc.

Each course syllabus will include a statement regarding student work expectations to earn credit for the course.  To the extent there is any variation from the standard course meeting times discussed above, the syllabus will describe the additional out-of-class work that makes up for the difference.  For example, in writing intensive courses, you will expect to work a significant amount of time out of class on independent research and writing. 

 

Clinics, Externships, Law Review, Moot Court, Special Projects, Writing Requirements:

For academic credits earned outside the typical course setting, students are required to log the number of hours they are working.  Students must log a minimum of 42.5 hours per semester per credit earned in the online portal established for this purpose.  Individual programs and professors may require more hours than the minimum.  At the conclusion of the semester, students are required to submit a log of their hours to the supervising faculty member.

Credit will be withheld from any student failing to comply with this institutional policy.

Compliance:

The Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, in conjunction with the Academic Programming Committee (APC), is tasked with ensuring compliance with this policy. 

For existing courses, each professor is required to submit a Standard 310 Form that identifies how each course complies with the requirements of Standard 310.  Each syllabus must also include a statement of the course workload expectations, which are consistent with the standard.  For new courses, the course proposal form requires those proposing courses to justify the number of credits sought to be offered.  The APC evaluates such justifications in connection with approving or modifying proposed courses.

Student course evaluations include new questions geared toward informing the Associate Dean and APC as to the amount of work experienced in each course.  All of the above are reviewed by the Associate Dean and APC to ensure compliance and institute changes as necessary.

Grades and Academic Standing

Grading System

The law school uses the following grading system:

A

Reserved for work which is definitely superior in quality.

B+

Intermediate grade.

B

Given for work which is consistently good and which manifests sufficient interest, effort, or originality to distinguish it as above average work.

C+

Intermediate grade.

C

Given for average work.

D+

Intermediate grade.

D

Earns credit, but students with a cumulative GPA below 2.0 are not in good academic standing.

F

Indicates failure and carries no credit.

W Withdrawal (does not count in the student's academic standing).
P Indicates the student has done at least average work in a pass/fail course.

IP

(In Progress) may be given to a student who has been hindered from completing work required in a course by circumstances beyond the student's control, if prior arrangements are made with the faculty member to complete work at a later date. A student receiving an IP grade must arrange with the faculty member to take whatever action is needed to remove the in progress grade at the earliest possible date. Absent extraordinary circumstances, a grade of IP not removed at the end of the next semester or summer term becomes an F; it cannot be removed by repeating the course.  The IP grade does not count in the GPA calculations.

CR Credit

AU

Indicates a student has attended a course for noncredit for at least 75% of the regular class meetings.

NA

Indicates no audit because the requirements were not met.

Quality Points

A

4.00 grade points per hour

B+

3.50 grade points per hour

B

3.00 grade points per hour

C+

2.50 grade points per hour

C

2.00 grade points per hour

D+

1.50 grade points per hour

D

1.00 grade points per hour

F

0.00 grade points per hour

P

carries no quality points. Courses graded with a P will not be counted in GPA calculations.

Please note that there is no appeal process for grades unless the instructor made a mathematical error.  The complaints procedure does not apply to complaints regarding grades.  Also be aware that there is no "conditional" failure. A student who receives a grade of F in a course may not receive another grade without repeating the course.

Effective with the class of 2018, no more than 12 pass/fail graded hours may count toward the 90 hours needed to earn the JD degree exclusive of Law Review and Moot Court Board.

Grade Point Average

Grade point average is based on graded work attempted at Mississippi College. If one repeats a course, both grades enter into calculation of the grade point average. Formula for calculation of the GPA: GPA = number of grade points divided by grade point hours. Credits in non-graded (pass-fail) courses do not carry grade points.

The GPA included on a student transcript will include all courses taken.  However, for purposes of determining class rank and whether first year students are in good academic standing, all first year students will be assessed based on the same courses.  Thus, grades from summer Property (typically a spring course) and Agency (not a typical first year course) will not be included after the fall semester of the first year.  While Property will be included with spring grades in the first year, no other non-first year course will be included until subsequent to the spring semester.

Mandatory Class Average for First Year Required Doctrinal Courses, Legal Writing and Legal Research

Absent exceptional circumstances, the grade point average for each section of first year courses, except for Legal Writing I, Legal Writing II, Legal Research I and Legal Research II shall be between 2.50 and 2.7999. In the event of exceptional circumstances, a professor may depart from this standard after consultation with the Associate Dean. Academic transcripts shall document that overall class average for first year doctrinal courses is expected to be between 2.50 and 2.7999.

Absent exceptional circumstances, the overall grade point average each semester for the sections for Legal Writing I, Legal Writing II, Legal Research I and Legal Research II shall not exceed 2.90. In the event of exceptional circumstances, the Director of Legal Writing or the Assistant Dean for Information, Technology and Research, may depart from this standard after consultation with the Associate Dean. Academic transcripts shall document that the overall class averages for the first year Legal Writing and Legal Research courses are expected not to exceed 2.90.

Dean's List

Students who achieve a semester grade point average of 3.25 or higher on at least 12 graded credit hours (excluding non-graded or pass-fail courses) will be recognized on the Dean's List for that semester. Students who meet this requirement will have a notation on their transcripts that they have earned "Dean's List" recognition. Students earning Dean's List recognition will receive an official certificate recognizing their achievement. Students in their final semester, who are enrolled for fewer than 12 graded credit hours and whose semester grade point average is 3.25 or higher may request that a Dean's List certificate be issued to them, but the notation will not be on their transcripts.

Grade Requirement for Good Academic Standing and Limitation on Enrollment in Intersession and Summer Courses

A cumulative average of at least 2.00 on hours for which a student registered and received a letter grade is required for good academic standing and for graduation from Mississippi College School of Law.

For purposes of determining whether first year students are in good academic standing, GPAs for all first year students will be calculated using the same first year courses.  Thus, good academic standing after the fall semester will not include grades from summer Property or Agency.  Similarly, good academic standing after the spring semester will include Property (typically a spring course), but not Agency or any other non-first year course taken by a first year during the spring semester.  Subsequent to the spring semester, the grades for all courses taken will be included in student GPA.

A first year student who enters law school in the summer term and whose GPA for the summer term is below a 2.0 will be given an academic warning (Law Warning). Such student is eligible to continue in the fall semester.

Any first year student whose cumulative GPA (excluding summer courses) is below 1.60 at the end of the first (fall) semester shall be dismissed from law school with no right of appeal. Beginning with the GPA at the end of the first (fall) semester of the first year, any other student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 will be placed on academic probation. Students on probation and those who have been on probation during law school must have their class schedules approved each semester by the Chair of the Academic Standards Committee or the Chair’s designee.

Students on academic probation are restricted in their ability to register for courses.  Consult the Course Registration Policies/Procedures section of this catalog.

If a student on probation fails to have a cumulative 2.00 by the end of the next succeeding fall or spring semester, whichever is earlier, that student shall be dismissed from law school. Any student who raises his/her cumulative GPA to an acceptable level of 2.00 after having been placed on probation and who’s cumulative GPA subsequently falls below a 2.00 shall be dismissed from law school.

A student other than a student whose cumulative GPA is below 1.60 at the end of the first (fall) semester has the right to appeal upon first dismissal for failure to maintain good academic standing. Such appeal must be received no later than seven (7) calendar days after the effective date of dismissal. Upon the showing of exceptional circumstances, the Academic Standards Committee may, in the exercise of its discretion, set aside a dismissal and allow the student an additional Fall or Spring Semester of probation. Thereafter, any student failing to have a cumulative GPA of 2.00 shall be dismissed from law school with no right of appeal.

Dismissal from Joint Degree Programs

If a student who is enrolled in a joint degree program such as the J.D./M.B.A. is dismissed from one of the degree programs, then the student is automatically dismissed from the other degree program as well. The student may appeal for readmission to either or both of the programs. A student wishing to register an appeal should contact the Graduate Office immediately for a specific form to be used for that purpose.

Examinations and Grade Reporting 

Regular examinations are held at the end of each semester for most courses. Instructors may schedule other examinations during the semester. Final examinations must be given at the time designated by the administration. Final grades for the fall semester are due to be reported from faculty to the Director of Law School Records not later than three weeks from the day of the last regularly scheduled final exam for first year students and four weeks from the day of the last regularly scheduled exam for upper level students. All grades are due for the spring semester not later than four weeks from the last regularly scheduled exam.  Summer term grades are due not later than three weeks after the last regularly scheduled exam.

A student who is deliberately absent from a final examination without legitimate reason will be given a grade of F in the course.

Incomplete Grades and Special Examinations

All examinations must be taken at the regularly scheduled time. A student may request an alternate exam date only in the event of an emergency. A student requesting an alternate exam date must complete an Alternate Exam Date Request Form.  Both the professor and the Associate Dean must approve a request for an alternate exam date by signing the Alternate Exam Date Request Form. After the required signatures are obtained, the student must submit the original form to the professor and give copies of the form to the Associate Dean and the faculty assistant responsible for scheduling alternate exam dates.

When a student with such permission does not take the examination at the regularly scheduled time, the course grade will be recorded as "in progress" (IP) by the faculty member. An "in progress" grade automatically becomes an F at the end of the next semester if the requirements for the course have not been met by that time. This rule applies whether a student remains in school or withdraws.

A student with permission to take a special examination must arrange a time for the examination which is acceptable to the faculty member who teaches the course in question and the Associate Dean. Responsibility for initiating these arrangements rests upon the student. Upon completing the examination, the student should complete the proper form available in the office of the dean in order to remove the incomplete grade.

Any student requesting reasonable accommodations for a disability should disclose the disability upon admission to the law school or as soon a possible after the disability is known. Disclosures and requests for accommodation must be made in writing to the Assistant Dean of Students.

Graduation

Application for Degree

Application for the Doctor of Jurisprudence degree should be filed when the student registers for the last semester (or summer session) before graduation. Application for the LL.M. degree should be filed when a student registers for the spring semester. The candidate for degree is charged a graduation fee. This fee, together with all accounts of any nature, must be paid in full at least fifteen days before the date of graduation in order for the student to be eligible to receive a diploma.

Graduation in Absentia

A student must make a written request to the dean at least two weeks before graduation in order to be graduated in absentia.

Graduation with Honors

Students who earn a grade point average of 3.25 on academic work attempted graduate cum laude; those who have an average of 3.50 graduate magna cum laude; and those who have an average of 3.75 or better graduate summa cum laude. These requirements apply to both J.D. and LL.M. students. Transfer students must earn 60 credit hours at Mississippi College School of Law to qualify for these designations.

Limit on Time for Graduation

To be graduated from MC Law, a J.D. student must successfully complete 90 credit hours of law school coursework no later than five years after the date on which the student first enrolled in a law school.

Students admitted to the Executive Program must complete 90 credit hours of coursework no later than 72 months from the date on which the student first enrolled in the Executive Program.

Withdrawal from Law School

A student desiring to withdraw from MC Law should initiate the process using the Complete Withdrawal link in the MY MC student portal. Withdrawal from law school before the midpoint of the semester will not result in any grades being entered on the student's academic record, provided proper procedure is followed. Failure to follow proper procedure may result in a grade of F for the courses in which the student was enrolled.

Failure to enroll during the regular academic year without receiving a leave of absence approved in writing from the dean results in automatic withdrawal and necessitates an application for readmission to resume the course of study.

Any claim for refund of tuition will be based on the date on which the student files a request for withdrawal with the dean of the law school. A student suspended or dismissed from law school for personal or academic misconduct is not entitled to any refund. For complete refund information, see the Refund Policy.

Transcripts

All requests for transcripts of grades and credits earned must be made through Credentials Solutions. Transcripts will not be issued for those whose accounts have unpaid balances. 

Transcripts for current law students are issued at no cost to the student by the Director of Law School Records.

Transfer to another Law School

After completing the first year of law school, a student may apply for transfer to another law school pursuant to the rules of that law school. MC Law will provide a transfer report to that law school upon request of the student. There is a fee to prepare this report for each school to which a transfer report is sent.

Course Registration
Policies/Restrictions

Academic Load for the J.D. Program

Students may not register for more than 16 nor fewer than 12 semester hours in any semester without the written permission of the Dean. No student may take more than 18 hours in a regular semester. Students may take up to 6 hours during the summer session without permission of the dean.  Courses taken during the winter or May intersessions are not considered as part of a regular semester or summer term for purposes of determining academic load for a regular semester.

Students should keep these credit hour restrictions in mind when planning class schedules and summer session attendance. A total of 90 semester hours must be completed prior to graduation (see requirements for the Doctor of Jurisprudence degree in the Degrees Offered section of this catalog).

Students should plan when they will take the courses required after their first year.  Please note that students on the guided curriculum must take three of the six additionally required courses during their second year.

Academic Load for the LL.M Program

Students in the LL.M. Program are required to take 6 credits in the summer term and 12 credits in each regular semester (fall and spring). Any exceptions to the required academic load for LL.M. students must be approved by the Director of the LL.M. Program.

Limitation on Pass/Fail Courses

Effective with the class of 2018, no more than 12 pass/fail graded hours may count toward the 90 hours needed to earn the J.D. degree exclusive of Law Review and Moot Court Board.

Limit on Non-Classroom Hours

No more than 8 non-classroom hours may count toward the 90 hours needed to earn the J.D. degree exclusive of Law Review and Moot Court Board.  Non-classroom courses are:  Writing Requirement, Special Projects I, Special Projects II, Moot Court Competition I, Moot Court Competition II, Moot Court Competition III, and the non-classroom portion of the Legal Extern Programs.  Any variance from this rule requires the written approval of the Dean.

Dropping and Adding Courses

After registration closes, the adding and dropping of courses and other schedule changes must be made through the Director of Law School Records. Such changes will be allowed only with the permission of the dean of the law school. Permission will not be given for a student to enter a course after the third week of a semester or after one week of a summer term, except for writing requirements and special project classes which do not involve classroom instruction.

A course that is dropped during weeks 1-3 of the semester of term will not be entered on the student's academic record if proper procedures are followed. A course that is dropped between week 4 and the official drop date will appear as a W on the student's transcript. A student who drops a course after the official drop date of the semester or term will receive a grade of F unless there were circumstances involved over which the student had no control, as determined by the dean. After the official drop date of the semester or term, in case of a genuine emergency such as hospitalization or moving away from the area, a student may drop a course with special permission from the dean and a grade of W may be entered on the record. The dropping of any course without following the designated procedure and receiving the approval of the dean will automatically result in a grade of F.

Residency Requirement, full-time students

The Doctor of Jurisprudence degree program is a three-year course of study requiring 5 semesters of no less than 12 semester credit hours each in residence at MC Law. Residency credit is awarded proportionately for summer work at MC Law. No "residence credit" is given for any course taken at another institution. For information on receiving permission to take courses for credit at another institution, see "Off-Campus Credit" in this section of this catalog.

To graduate from MC Law, a transfer student must complete at least 60 hours in residence over the course of no less than 4 semesters in residence at MC Law. Residency work may be awarded proportionately for summer work at MC Law.

To graduate with honors, a J.D. student must take at least 60 semester credit hours at MC Law.

The accelerated two-year J.D. program allows the student to complete requirements for the J.D. degree over four regular semesters and three summer terms.

Distance Education Courses

A student may take a total of fifteen (15) credit hours through distance education courses. A "distance education course" is defined as one in which students are separated from the faculty member or each other for more than one-third of the instruction and the instruction involves the use of technology to support regular and substantive interaction among students and between the students and the faculty member, either synchronously or asynchronously.  The classroom component of a Remote Extern Program class is counted toward the distance education caps.

Unless a course is offered solely in a distance education format (e.g., the professor is in a location separate from all of the students), a student must obtain the permission of the Dean (or Associate Dean for Academic Affairs) and the instructor to take the course synchronously or asynchronously.  A form requesting approval may be obtained from the Director of Law School Records.

If an exam is given in a distance education course, all students enrolled in the course, including those participating remotely, will take the exam on the MC Law campus according to the normal procedures for examination.

Off-Campus Credit

Students must receive written permission from the dean prior to registering for any course for credit at another law school. Request for permission should include the name of the school, the exact title and number of the course to be taken, a course description and the amount of credit awarded by the school to be attended. As a general rule, students will only be given permission to take courses at another ABA-accredited law school if it is for the purpose of taking courses not offered at MC Law, to unite with spouses or for family emergencies requiring the physical presence of the student. A student must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher to receive permission to take courses at another law school. Except in exceptional circumstances as determined by the dean, students may not receive permission to take required courses at another law school. No student who has been on academic probation at any time during law school will be given permission to take courses at another school. See the section on tuition and fees for how tuition will be charged for taking courses at another law school. The dean of the law school reserves the right to determine whether any law course from another institution will be accepted toward the student's degree at MC Law. No residency credit or quality points are awarded at MC Law for any course taken at another institution and no credit will be allowed for any course in which the grade earned was below a C. A fee of $100 will be assessed if the student is visiting another law school during the student's final term of the law school. This fee is in addition to the graduation fee.

Employment Restriction

A student in the first or second year shall not be employed in excess of 20 hours per week in any semester in which the student is enrolled in 12 or more credit-hours.  A student in the third year, with a cumulative grade point average of less than 2.75, shall not be employed in excess of 20 hours per week in any semester in which the student is enrolled in 12 or more credit-hours.  This restriction applies to the summer term (if 6 hours or more are taken) as well as to the regular year.  There is no employment restriction for a third year student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 or above.  A student on probation shall not be employed.  Violation of this policy may subject a student to disciplinary action, including dismissal. 

LL.M. students are not eligible for any form of employment through work-study.

Restriction for Students on Probation

A student who is on academic probation (see Grade Requirement for Good Academic Standing section of this catalog) may register for summer courses.  If the student does not earn the required cumulative GPA to be removed from probation, the student will be academically dismissed and will not be allowed to continue in summer school regardless of the ruling on any appeal.

A student who is on academic probation when registration opens for the summer or winter intersession courses may not register for and/or enroll in an intersession course.

A student whose GPA drops below a 2.0 at the end of a semester and has already enrolled in an on-campus summer school course will be removed from the course and the tuition will be refunded.

A student whose GPA drops below a 2.0 at the end of a semester and has already completed an intersession class while on probation, but before grades were available, may elect to be removed from the course and have the tuition refunded or to take a pass/fail credit for the course.

A student whose GPA drops below a 2.0 at the end of a semester and is enrolled in a study abroad program may elect to be removed from the course and have the tuition refunded or to take a pass/fail credit for the course.

Course Descriptions

CodeCourse NameCredits
500 Principles of Legal Analysis0 sem. hr.
This course is designed to help first year students further develop analysis and writing skills, including rule analysis, case briefing and statutory interpretation. Focus will be on the integration of specific skills and exercises that are both substantively relevant and address specific areas of concern in the first year doctrinal classes, while focusing on thoughtful analysis and essay writing techniques. Active learning and self-assessment will be emphasized throughout the course, and extensive individualized feedback will be an important component.

Note:Note.
502 Torts I3 sem. hrs.
General principles of civil liability for breach of duty created by law, including: intentional interference with person and property and privileges thereof; negligence and the defenses thereof; damages, wrongful death and survival, imputed negligence, strict liability, products liability, nuisance, misrepresentation, defamation, privacy, misuse of legal procedure, interference with advantageous relationships and major statutory modifications (no-fault insurance).
503 Torts II2 sem. hrs.
Continuation of Torts I.
504 Products Liability2 sem. hrs.
A study of the law relating to liability for injuries caused by defective products, including an examination of theories of liability, potential defendants, defenses, issues of proof, causation, damages, and regulatory issues.
505 Advanced Torts2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will explore significant areas of tort law not covered in Torts I?and?Torts II and not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Topics may include the law of defamation, privacy, interference with advantageous relations, misuse of legal procedure, and misrepresentation.
506 Contracts I3 sem. hrs.
Fundamental concepts and principles of contract law and the law of sales, including competency of parties, offer and acceptance, consideration, mutuality, counteroffer, rejection, lapse, execution, breach, remedies, assignment, third party beneficiaries, parole evidence, Statute of Frauds, and discharges. Relevant U.C.C. provisions are studied in conjunction with certain concepts or principles.
507 Contracts II3 sem. hrs.
Continuation of Contracts I.
508 Sales and Leasing3 sem. hrs.
A study of Articles 2 and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code and other state and federal statutes governing the sale and lease of goods. Coverage may also include selected provisions of the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods.
509 Mission First Legal Aid Clinic3 sem. hrs.
The Legal Aid Clinic will provide skill-focused instruction reinforced by providing legal advice and assistance to clients. Students may participate in client interviewing, client conflict records, client communication, legal research, document preparation, court proceedings and trial in the subject matter areas of government benefits, housing, consumer matters, income tax, guardianship, child support, and family law matters. Students will meet with the instructor for one hour per week during the semester. Each student will be required to log a total of at least 150 hours of time in classroom meetings, a trial, hearing or other proceeding. All participants will be supervised by the course instructor. Class enrollment is limited. Graduating third year students will be given preference if there are more applications than available clinic openings. Students must be eligible for admission under Mississippi Law Student Limited Practice Rule. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
510 Hazardous Waste Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an overview of civil and criminal liability for hazardous waste contamination and the federal law concerning hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal. Course readings and discussion will emphasize CERCLA and RCRA.
517 Comparative Products Liability2-3 sem. hrs.
This course provides an introductory survey of Comparative Law with a focus on the Civil Law and Common Law legal traditions. Topics will include the history of these traditions, structures and roles of legal institutions within these traditions, sources of law and interpretive practices. The course will then focus on comparative study of the law of products liability with emphasis on the American and European approaches to liability for injuries caused by defective products, theories of liability, defenses, proof, causation, damages and regulatory issues.
518 Comparative Corporate Governance and Securities Regulation2-3 sem. hrs.
This course presents a comparative overview of corporate governance issues and Securities Regulation focusing on the US, the European Union and some Asian countries. It seeks to encourage the study of comparative law as a means of thinking about law in a globalized economy.? The course will provide an introduction to economic theories as well as an analysis of the OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. Specifically, the laws and practices in the United States and some European Union Member States will be discussed and compared. The course will also compare the regulation of securities transactions in these jurisdictions. Issues considered will include the public offering of securities to investors outside an issuer's home country, the periodic disclosure required of an issuer whose shares are held by investors outside its home country,?and the reach abroad of nationally based anti-fraud regimes.
519 The Civil War and the Constitution3 sem. hrs.
This course will examine the constitutional history of the United States from 1845 to 1877, paying attention to how the U.S. Constitution shaped the Civil War, and also to how the war left its mark on the Constitution. In this seminar, we will discuss such issues as congressional power to regulate slavery in the territories, the problem of race and slavery in constitutional law, suspension of civil liberties during wartime, congressional and presidential war powers, the respective powers of the state and federal governments, and the meaning of the Reconstruction (13th, 14th, and 15th) Amendments. Grades will be based on an original research paper, class participation, and a presentation on the research performed for the paper. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
520 Legal Project Management2 sem. hrs.
This course will investigate the reliance upon the billable hour by both law firms and clients. The course will evaluate the problems with the billable hour, including ethical considerations, and will review common complaints by clients at the various stages of the engagement. These concepts will form the baseline for a study of legal project management and the need for a more methodical and predictable approach to the management of legal matters and teams. The course will evaluate the use of these tools in small engagements, repetitive commodity engagements, electronic discovery, document review and engagements involving unique legal issues. The course will conclude with a class exercise where students will implement these techniques in a mock legal engagement. Students must have 60 credits prior to taking this course. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed sixty credit hours.
521 Comparative Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course provides a survey of Comparative Law with a focus on the Civil Law and Common Law legal traditions. Topics covered include the history of each tradition, the structures of government and court systems, legal education, the roles played by legal actors, civil and criminal procedure, and sources of law as well as interpretive practices. The course also considers selected problems in comparative constitutional law. Among the topics discussed are: comparative individual rights and liberties, including the rights of the accused, constitutional entrenchment, the structure and procedure used by constitutional courts, foundational case narratives, separation of powers in comparative perspective, and federalism in comparative perspective. In the Summer Legal Studies in Merida program, special attention will be given to these doctrines and procedures in Mexico, especially in the State of Yucat?n.
522 Constitutional Law4 sem. hrs.
History and development of the U.S. Constitution; the judicial role in constitutional interpretation; the division of powers among the three branches of government; relation of the federal government to the states; constitutional limitations on the federal government and the states as related to the protection of individual freedoms, rights and guarantees.
524 First Amendment3 sem. hrs.
A study of the development and current status of constitutional law governing establishment and free exercise of religion, and free speech, press, assembly, and petition.
525 Capital Punishment Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will examine the complex substantive and procedural law governing the imposition of the death penalty in the United States. The course will focus on the development of Eighth Amendment jurisprudence, discuss the role of aggravating and mitigating evidence, and consider limitations on eligibility for the death penalty. In addition, the course will analyze issues affecting the death penalty, including race, poverty, a client?s mental health, the adequacy of counsel, and prosecutorial discretion. Procedural issues, including motion practice and the pleading and practice associated with the state post-conviction petitions and federal habeas corpus petitions will also be discussed. The course use a standard casebook, and will also involve the students in solving problems taken
526 Themes in Comparative Constitutional Law1-3 sem. hrs.
This course illuminates important concepts and themes in constitutional law by considering them from competing national and international perspectives.? The course begins with a general introduction to the concepts of constitutionalism, rights, duties and rule of law.? The course then addresses the different roles constitutions play in different states.? The course will then shift to focus on a specific them in comparative constitutional law such as Religious, Racial, and Ethnic Pluralism; Separation of Powers; Social Welfare Rights; or Freedom of Expression.? The specific theme may differ from semester to semester.? Students may be required to write and present a paper.? When this course is offered for two credit hours and a paper is required, students who wish to use the paper toward satisfaction of the writing requirement may do so.? When this course is offered for three credit hours and a paper is required, the paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
527 Solo and Small Law Practice2 sem. hrs.
This course provides an introduction to the overall practice of law in small and solo firms and the practice of law in small towns and rural settings. Similar to law practice management, this course places a particular emphasis on the management of solo and small firm practice. Students explore the decision to start a solo or small law practice; how to build that practice; affiliational arrangements and partnership agreements; particular management issues; ethical and malpractice pitfalls and malpractice insurance; substantive and administrative systems; law library and other information resources; computer hardware and software; client development and client relations; fee setting, billing, and collection; financial planning and budgets and problems most often associated with the practice of law in small and solo practices that tend to exist mostly in small towns and rural areas.
530 Clean Water Act and Wetlands2 sem. hrs.
This course will present an introductory survey of the Clean Water Act?s water pollution control and discharge permitting processes, including the imposition of technology-based and health-based water pollution control measures. The course also will discuss citizen suits, civil and criminal enforcement, wetland dredge-and-fill permits, and state water quality certifications. A practice-oriented approach will be stressed.
531 Food Law and Policy2 sem. hrs.
A study of the laws and policies addressing food labeling, food safety, and food related consumer protection.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
532 Bioethics and Law3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces a variety of dilemmas in biomedical ethics brought about primarily by innovative techniques and technologies that the biomedical sciences have developed; such as artificial reproductive technologies, genetic screening and engineering, and life support systems. Many of these dilemmas are not currently or clearly regulated by law. Thus, the primary focus of our inquiry will be whether these innovations should be regulated by law and if so, how. In this inquiry, ethical and policy considerations will play a substantial role in the analysis.
533 Military and Operational Law2 sem. hrs.
The study of the evolution of military law culminating in the current version of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The practice of criminal law in the military will be compared with that of Federal and State criminal practice to include a comparison of the grand jury system with the Article 32 investigation, the Federal Rules of Evidence and the Military Rules of Evidence, and the conduct of civilian criminal trials with courts-martial. This course will also examine the status of the service member when serving in a foreign country, the applicability of local foreign law to military operations, and the authority of the Foreign Claims Act to provide payment for damage caused by military operations.
535 Regulation of the Health Care Industry and Professionals2 sem. hrs.
This class explores the regulatory environment affecting physicians, health care professionals and health care institutions, including licensing, staff privileges, peer review, and accreditation. This course will also examine the role of the legislative branch of government in health care through a review of major government health programs and policies. Students will learn how health policy gets formulated, evaluated, and assessed prior to being voted into law and will then explore the process of new policy implementation.
537 HIV and the Law Clinic3 sem. hours
The HIV and the Law Clinic will provide students with skill-focused instruction through legal assistance to clients and policy-related advocacy. This clinic is part of a medical-legal partnership between the Mississippi Center for Justice, the University of Mississippi Medical Center, and the Mississippi Department of Health. Students will be exposed to a blend of direct client services and policy work, in areas including employment discrimination, housing violations, and other conduct based on the client’s HIV status. Students may participate in client intake and interviewing, legal research, and document preparation; provide research and writing for policy initiatives aimed at improving the lives of people living with HIV; and participate in educating the community about HIV and related laws. Each student will be required to complete 135 hours of clinical work (which includes both direct services and policy work), in addition to the classroom component (a six-hour introductory class, followed by one-and-a-half-hour classes every month during the semester). Enrollment is limited, and students must be eligible for admission under the Mississippi Law Student Limited Practice Act. Students make application to participate. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
561 Criminal Law3 sem. hrs.
An examination of the substantive criminal law, its jurisprudence, origin and sources, including some specific crimes and defenses at common law and under modern statutes.
562 Criminal Procedure3 sem. hrs.
An introduction to criminal justice administration, emphasizing the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments of the U. S. Constitution as applied to pretrial procedure.
573 Property4 sem. hrs.
A study of the interests which may be created in real and personal property. The topics considered include possession, personal property, deeds, freehold estates, future interests, concurrent ownership, property as an institution, the real estate contract, the recording system, title assurance, easements, landlord-tenant law, and land use controls.
575 Land Use Controls3 sem. hrs.
This course examines the legal tools used by governments, landowners, and their neighbors to influence the development and use of land. The specific topics covered include takings, planning, zoning, subdivision and design controls, racial and economic implications of government policy, and homeowner associations.
580 Legal Research I1 sem. hr.
Provides an introduction to the sources of law in the American system, the legal research process, and specific instruction in finding and analyzing primary and secondary source materials.
581 Legal Research II1 sem. hr.
Provides specific instruction in finding and analyzing administrative and legislative history materials and allows students to develop skills in comparing the effectiveness of research using print and electronic resources.
582 Legal Writing I2 sem. hrs.
Development of skills in analysis and writing in the context of writing primarily interoffice or predictive memoranda with emphasis on plain English. Students build from early exercises applying a rule to a short set of facts to synthesizing and applying complex rules to more extensive fact patterns.
583 Legal Writing II2 sem. hrs
Introduction of persuasive writing techniques; building on analytical skills developed in first semester, with increased emphasis on organizing persuasive arguments. Students will prepare one or more briefs and participate in at least one oral argument.
587 Legal Writing III3 sem. hrs.
In this course students will be exposed to the functions of appellate review, the record on appeal and, the theory of brief?writing?and oral argument. Students will also learn the fundamentals of transactional?writing?through drafting and negotiating exercises.

Prerequisite: LAW?582 - Legal Writing I, LAW?583 - Legal Writing II, LAW?580 - Legal Research I?, and LAW?581 - Legal Research II?
600 Law Review1 sem. hr.
This course is designed to teach techniques and research methods for legal writing in connection with the Mississippi College Law Review. Each student is required to produce written work, acceptable for publication, in order to receive credit for the course. Students are selected for membership on the basis of academic standing and legal research and writing ability after the first year. One hour of credit is given for each semester of satisfactory participation as a board or staff member. A maximum of four semester hours may be earned for law review participation.
601 Appellate Advocacy2 sem. hrs.
This course deals with the functions of appellate review, the record on appeal and, the theory of brief writing and oral argument.

Prerequisite: LAW?582?-?Legal Writing I,? LAW?583?-?Legal Writing II,?LAW?580?-?Legal Research I and?LAW?581?-?Legal Research II
602 Advanced Appellate Advocacy1 sem. hr.
Students prepare an appellate brief and participate in oral argument. Members of the law school?s National Appellate Competition Team may be selected on the basis of performance in the course. This course is not required except for those students who wish to be considered for membership on the Moot Court Board or the National Appellate Competition Team. The course is available as an elective.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Litigation Skills (584).
603 Moot Court Board1-2 sem. hrs.
Students are chosen for Moot Court Board on the basis of their performance in the Appellate Advocacy Competition. Board members assist faculty in administering Appellate Advocacy, the Appellate Advocacy Competition and other competitions. Upon approval by the faculty advisor, a member shall receive two (2) credit hours in the spring semester of the third year for membership on the Board. A Board member who graduates in December will be eligible for one (1) credit hour in the fall semester of the third year.
604 Moot Court Competition I1 sem. hr.
Students satisfactorily participating in trial appellate advocacy, pretrial, ADR, or transactional intercollegiate competitions who have not previously received credit for a competition may receive one credit for such participation, provided that competitors participating in competitions not requiring a written brief or other substantial written work product write a ten (10) page analysis on an issue raised in the competition. This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis. ?
605 Moot Court Competition II1 sem. hr.
Students satisfactorily participating in trial appellate advocacy, pretrial, ADR, or transactional ?intercollegiate competitions who have previously received credit for a competition may receive one credit hour for participation in a second competition, provided that competitors participating in competitions not requiring a written brief or other substantial written work product write a ten (10) page analysis on an issue raised in the competition. This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis. ?
606 Moot Court Competition III1 sem. hr.
Students satisfactorily participating in trial appellate advocacy, pretrial, ADR, or transactional intercollegiate competitions who have previously received credit for a competition? may receive one credit hour for participation in a? third competition, provided that competitors participating in competitions not requiring a written brief or other substantial written work product write a ten (10) page analysis on an issue raised in the competition. This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis.
607 Phillip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition I1 sem. hr.
The course prepares second and third year law students for the year-long Jessup International Moot Court Competition, which includes regional, national and international rounds. The course includes an introduction to the primary sources, doctrinal rules and principles of international law, as well as the methodologies of advanced research in international law. Students will work in small groups and learn how to evaluate and solve problems in international law. Enrollment requires each team member to devote at least 6 hours per week to research, writing and oral arguments. Enrollment is limited to a maximum of five students. Participation and enrollment is subject to approval by the Director of Advocacy and a faculty advisor. The credit awarded to a student for participation in the fall semester of the second and third year, respectively, is a graded one hour (1) classroom credit; and the credit awarded for participation in the spring semester of each year is a one hour (1) pass/fail non-classroom credit.??
608 Phillip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition II1 sem. hr.
See Phillip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition I for description. Jessup II is the designated course for 3L students who participate in the Jessup International Moot Court competition for a second year. Students in this course will also serve as mentors for 2L participants.
609 Adoption Legal Clinic3 sem. hrs.
Students enrolled in this course will learn about adoption law and termination of parental rights in Mississippi. This course is limited to students who are eligible to practice under the limited practice act in chancery court. Students will assist in completing adoptions of children placed in prospective adoptive homes by the Mississippi Department of Human Services, including preparation of petitions and final decrees. Students will prepare all reports and exhibits necessary for adoption, serve as attorneys for the adoptive families and may be appointed as guardians ad litem in termination of parental rights and adoption cases. All participants in any adoption proceeding will be supervised by the course instructor. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
610 Youth Court Clinic3 sem. hrs.
This course will examine the substantive and procedural laws governing cases of alleged child abuse and neglect, termination of parental rights and finalization of adoptions in Mississippi courts. Students will represent children in the court system with the close support and supervision of a faculty member. Building on the field experience of actual case handling as a basis for analysis, it seeks to make students more self-critical and reflective about various lawyering functions they must undertake. In order for students to effectively represent juvenile clients, the course will include instruction concerning child psychology, identifying signs of child abuse and neglect, client interviewing and case file management. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 45 credit hours.
611 Child Welfare & Family Justice Clinic3 sem. hrs.


Prerequisite: The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
612 Guardian Ad Litem Clinic3 sem. hrs.
Students enrolled in this course will learn about child custody and parenting issues in chancery court, including adoptions, terminations of parental rights, guardian-ships, custody matters, child support matters, grandparents' rights, and similar related matters. Students who are eligible to practice under the limited practice rules may be admitted to practice in chancery court for the purpose of handling one or more cases to the matters described above. Students will meet with the instructor for one hour per week during the semester and will also observe or participate in chancery court. All participants in chancery court proceedings will be supervised by the course instructor. Each student will be required to log a total of at least 80 hours of time in classroom meetings or court proceedings. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 45 credit hours.
613 Accounting for Lawyers2 sem. hrs.
A study of the basic principles, conventions and methods of accounting to enable the lawyer to understand the legal economic environment, with specific reference to the accounting problems encountered in such courses as Federal Taxation Law and Business Associations I?and Business Associations II. This course is recommended for students without a substantial foundation in accounting. Except with the written permission of the instructor, this course is not open to students who have completed the equivalent of six semester hours in accounting.
614 Accounting Issues in Business Decisions3 sem. hrs.
The course provides an introduction to the analysis and use of corporate financial reports from the perspectives of investors, creditors and other external users. Coverage ranges from the pressures faced by management, accountants and auditors as they prepare financial statements to the impact of accounting information on strategic decisions. From an internal decision-making perspective, the course examines the preparation and use of managerial accounting information. Topics include activity based costing, decision support systems including relevant costs and benefits, and budgeting systems. This course is limited to joint J.D./M.B.A. candidates.
615 Policy Formulation and Administration3 sem. hrs.
The capstone course for the graduate business school curriculum that integrates the fundamental aspects of business (marketing, finance, accounting, economics, operations) into a coherent view of management. Through the case analysis method, students study the role of strategy in the management of large and small firms and investigate the principles and practices that lead to successful organizations, both public and private. This course is limited to joint J.D./M.B.A. candidates.
616 Agency2 sem. hrs.
A study of agency power and authority, termination, rights and duties of agents and principals. May also include issues of master and servant relationships.
618 Wills and Estates3 sem. hrs.
A study of the law of succession of estates including wills, fraud and undue influence, restraints on testamentary powers, capacity, execution and revocation, construction and interpretation, descent and distribution by intestacy; administration of estates, testamentary and inter vivos trusts, and introductory estate tax planning.
619 Business Associations I4 sem. hrs.
A study of the law of business organizations, including partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. Topics may include choice of business form, formation, organization, capitalization, rights and relationships between owners and the organization. Related state and federal topics may be selectively covered.
620 Business Associations II2 sem. hrs.
Building on the general principles covered in Business Associations I, this course explores in detail the state and federal laws and regulations which govern the formation, management, and dissolution of business enterprises. Special emphasis is given to issues relating to business finance, such as capitalization and distributions, compliance with Federal and state securities laws, and the rights of investors to participate in management of the business.
621 Secured Transactions and Creditors? Rights3 sem. hrs.
This course covers Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It deals with the law governing security interests in business collateral, such as equipment, inventory, accounts receivable, and chattel paper as well as the financing of purchases by consumers. The course will also cover consumer credit regulation, enforcement of judgments, attachments, garnishment, fraudulent conveyances, and assignments for the benefit of creditors.
623 Evidence3 sem. hrs.
Examination of the law of evidence (emphasizing the Federal Rules of Evidence), objectives and limitations of an adversary system of dispute resolution, norms and restraints on advocacy, and allocation of responsibility between judge and jury. Topics explored include: hearsay; relevance; witnesses (e.g., competence, privileges, examination, and experts); documentary and real evidence; judicial notice; burden of proof; and presumptions.
624 Asset Forfeiture2 sem. hrs.
A survey of asset forfeiture law in the United States, covering the history and evolution of forfeiture law, the theories of forfeitability, the advantages and disadvantages of criminal, civil and administrative forfeiture, forfeiture procedure, and the role of the 8th amendment in asset forfeiture law.
625 Civil Procedure I3 sem. hrs.
An overview of the law governing civil litigation. Topics include: personal jurisdiction; jurisdiction of the subject matter; venue; pleadings; discovery; pretrial motions; trial; challenges to the verdict; appeal; res judicata and collateral estoppel.
626 Civil Procedure II3 sem. hrs.
Continuation of Civil Procedure I.
627 Advanced Civil Procedure3 sem. hrs.
A study in selected topics in civil procedure, including: joinder of parties and claims; class actions; pretrial and trial case management; right to jury trial; complex litigation; ADR; verdicts; procurement, enforcement and finality of judgments; appeals.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
628 Compliance in Financial Institutions1 sem. hrs.
This pra ctical course will explore the role of compliance in financial institutions. It will examine the essential elements of effective compliance programs, the regulatory expectations for banks and investment companies, common issues that challenge compliance, and how to establish adequate monitoring systems. This course is particularly relevant as new laws, rules, and regulations stemming from the financial crisis dramatically affect a wide range of financial institutions. The course is recommended for students who wish to pursue a career in compliance or work for financial institutions, regulatory agencies, or law firms representing clients in the financial industry.
629 Advanced Child Advocacy Clinic2-3 sem. hrs.
This Court is limited to students who are eligible to practice under the?limited practice act in chancery court. Students enrolled in this course will?learn about?advanced child custody and adoption issues in chancery court, including but not limited to adoptions involving IPCP, contested?terminations of parental rights, contested guardianships, custody matters?involving third party custody or?in loco parentis, and custody matters?involving UCCJEA, child support matters, grandparent's rights, and similar related matters. Students will continue work not completed in either Law 609 or Law 612, plus will accept additional work assignments to satisfy?the hourly credit requirement. Students will meet with the instructor for one hour per week during the semester and will observe or participate in chancery court proceedings. All participants in chancery court proceedings will be supervised by the course instructor. Each student will?be required to log a total in classroom meetings or court proceedings of at?least 100 hours for 2 credit hours or 150 hours for 3 credit hours. Credits?will count towards experiential learning. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: LAW 609 - Adoption Legal Clinic?OR LAW 612 - Guardian Ad Litem Clinic?
630 Commercial Paper3 sem. hrs.
This course is a study of the rights and obligations of participants in a variety of payment transactions, ranging from traditional methods of payment such as checks and promissory notes to modern methods such as credit and debit cards, automated teller machines and wire transfers. The course focuses on Articles 3, 4 and 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code; however, federal statutes and regulations and their relationship to state law are considered.
633 Oil and Gas3 sem. hrs.
A study of estates or interests of possessors of realty in mineral rights, oil, water and gas below the surface, leases, royalties, bonuses, delay rentals, depletion, utilization, riparian rights, and regulatory practices of governmental agencies and applicable statutes or laws. Some material dealing with geology and geophysics is used.
634 Environmental Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course is a study of the response of the American legal system to environmental problems, including air and water pollution and the disposal of toxic substances. Federal statutes and regulations are emphasized.
635 Worker?s Compensation2 sem. hrs.
A study of compensation to injured workers for industrial accidents, injuries, and diseases. Included are a detailed treatment of workers? remedies prior to and apart from workers? compensation, the compensation principle, the employer-employee relationship, accidents during the course of employment, accidents arising out of the employment, accident and occupational disease, proof of causation, effect of independent causes after the accident, compensation for non-fatal injury, death benefits, and the third party suit.
637 Corporate and Partnership Taxation3 sem. hrs.
An introductory study of the federal income tax concepts applied to entities and their owners in formations, distributions, redemptions, liquidations and terminations, reorganizations and sales.

Prerequisite: Federal Taxation Law (LAW 638).
638 Federal Taxation Law3 sem. hrs.
An introductory study of substantive and procedural individual income tax concepts, including gross income; deductions; identification of taxpayers; problems incident to the sale, exchange and other disposition of property; recognition; timing; and, characterization.
639 Arbitration Practice and Procedure2 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to the arbitration practice and procedure in commercial, employment and consumer arbitrations. Current arbitration rules and procedural issues will be analyzed, including the use of discovery in arbitration and class actions. In addition, the rules of the American Arbitration Association and other leading arbitration institutions will be discussed. Special focus will be given to examining the role of arbitrators, judicial award confirmation and the limited right to appeal arbitration awards. ?
640 Entertainment Law2 sem. hrs.
The course offers a dynamic and interactive general survey of the legal principles and business practices of the entertainment industry. Topics include music, film, television, books, online and live performance. The relationship between artists, managers and agents together with specific areas of entertainment litigation are surveyed. Treatment of the ever expanding global implications of the entertainment industry is also included. Some of the business and legal considerations facing attorneys practicing in the entertainment area are introduced through a series of graded project assignments. No examination.
642 Pension and Employee Benefit Law3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the laws and policies regarding the creation, operation and termination of employee benefit plans, including health benefits and pension plans with emphasis on qualified plans and the Employment Retirement Income Security Act of 1974.
643 Entrepreneurship Law3 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to legal questions associated with the start up and operation of entrepreneurial ventures, which may include social ventures and not-for-profit organizations. Subjects covered include choice of entity, copyright and trademark, e-Commerce, and special issues of management. Some time will also be spent on, employment and executive compensation issues, risk management, protecting the intellectual property of a start up and ethical issues facing attorneys who represent entrepreneurs. The goal of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the legal problems they may encounter in an entrepreneurial setting either as attorneys or as owners of an equity position in the enterprise. The course focus is practical highlighting the skills attorneys need when advising entrepreneurial ventures and clients. Prerequisites: Law 619 Business Associations I.
644 Employment Discrimination3 sem. hrs.
This course deals with the various federal statutes prohibiting discrimination in employment, focusing primarily on the prohibition against discrimination contained in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Other statutes such as the Civil Rights Acts of 1866 and 1870 (42 USC sections 1981 and 1983), the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act are also considered.
645 Labor Law3 sem. hrs.
This course deals principally with labor relations between private employers and employees acting in a collective capacity. It generally involves: historical background; organization and representation of employees; union collective action and collective bargaining.
646 Employment Law3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the law relating to the employment relationship, including the establishment and terms of employment contracts, termination of employment, regulation of pay and hours, protections afforded employees in the areas of privacy and safety, and compensation for employee illness and injury.
647 Health Care Fraud and Abuse2 sem. hrs.
This course examines federal and state laws that impose criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of fraudulent activities. The course explores the implications of the federal Anti-Kickback statute, civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, anti-referral (Stark) laws, and false claim laws, as well as traditional federal white collar criminal laws and certain regulations and advisory opinions applied to health care. The course will use statutes, case law and commentary to identify the various forms of fraud and self-dealing and the law?s response.
648 Expert Witness Seminar2 sem. hrs.
This course deals with expert witnesses and scientific evidence. Students are given an opportunity to participate as counsel in simulated trials dealing exclusively with experts. Trial Practice (LAW 681) is a required concurrent or antecedent course. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.
649 Comparative Civil Rights2 sem. hrs.
The course will compare and contrast, from both a theoretical and doctrinal perspective, civil rights and liberties in the United States and other countries and regional organizations. Topics to be covered include freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and other substantive and procedural aspects of liberty and equality. When the course is offered in a study abroad program, special attention will be given to region involved.
650 Sports Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to the foundations of sports law. Sports law reflects how various legal disciplines, including torts, antitrust, labor, agency, criminal, contract, and anti-discrimination laws, impact professional and amateur sports actors, such as leagues, conferences, teams, and players. This course will provide students with both practical and theoretical approaches to legal issues that arise in sports, including in the NFL, NBA, MLB, NCAA, NASCAR, PGA, NHL, tennis, and hunting. Students will read sports law writings, including cases and law review articles, as well as readings from other disciplines, including social psychology and economics. Students will also be expected to discuss current and breaking issues in sports law as they emerge over the course of the semester.
651 Domestic Relations3 sem. hrs.
Family law related to marriage, separation and divorce; rights and liabilities of husband and wife; property rights; parent and child relational rights and duties, disabilities, adoption, emancipation, paternal authority and support.
652 Current Issues in Family Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course examines current issues of family law in depth. Topics change from year to year and may include same sex marriage, civil unions, covenant marriage, legal effects of new reproductive technology, effects of welfare reform on family law issues, ?parental alienation syndrome,? child custody, required mediation in divorce, and other topics of current interest.
653 Global Issues in Corporate Law1-2 sem. hrs.
This course will familiarize students with foreign corporate laws (including those of Germany and other EU jurisdictions), clarify issues under United States corporate law as they apply to global concerns and to challenge assumptions that the United States law is always the most desirable choice.
654 Insurance3 sem. hrs.
A study of the laws and regulations governing the insurance industry including: classification of insurance; the marketing process; the principle of indemnity; the insurable interest doctrine; subrogation; other insurance clauses; persons and interests protected; warranties and representations; concealment; unconscionability; detrimental reliance; and the claims process.
655 Corporate Finance3 sem. hrs.
An examination of the legal and financial factors affecting the manner in which business firms obtain needed capital. Topics include valuation, classes of security, capital structure, dividend policy, and mergers and acquisitions.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
656 Banking Law2 or 3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the law governing commercial banking, including the regulation of activities of banks and financial holding companies by federal and state regulatory agencies as well as laws and regulations pertaining to bank failure, and mergers and acquisitions in the banking industry. The course will also examine the relative advantages and disadvantages of state and nationally chartered banks, and the law related to lender liability claims.
657 Venture Capital2 sem. hrs.
This course will cover a range of issues relating to start-up ventures and developmental stage companies. The course will focus on the balancing of competing economic interests among founders, venture capitalists, directors, management, employees, and shareholders. The goal is for students to obtain an understanding of how these varying interests interact in the early stages of the development of a business and how the law attempts to deal with these competing interests. Topics to be covered will include: Choosing the Appropriate Enterprise Entity, Funding the Entity, Venture Investing, Retaining and Motivating Employees, and Exit Strategies. The course will be interdisciplinary and will include issues relating to corporate, securities, tax, and intellectual property laws.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
658 Business Ethics2-3 sem. hrs.
A study of applied ethics that examines ethical principles and moral or ethical problems that may arise in a business environment. Topics may include issues regarding the moral rights and duties between a company and its shareholders, between a corporation and its employees, between different companies, and between the corporation and society at large. Taking Business Associations I prior to this course or simultaneously with it is recommended.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
659 Small Business Law and Entrepreneurship2 sem. hrs.
This seminar focuses on legal issues in small business associations, from an entrepreneurial perspective. Topics include forming a small business, partnerships, franchising, joint ventures, government procurement policies and programs, commercial leases, employer-employee issues, buy/sell agreements, intellectual property, international trade, and ethical considerations for the small business lawyer.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
660 Remedies3 sem. hrs.
A study of equitable and legal remedies, which includes consideration of equitable principles and procedures and defenses; restitution and unjust enrichment; reformation and rescission; and damages in a variety of contexts.
661 Business Bankruptcy2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on business bankruptcies including liquidations and reorganizations. It also will deal with certain litigation issues in business cases. The course will be particularly beneficial to students interested not only in bankruptcy law, but commercial litigation and business transactions as well.

Prerequisite: Bankruptcy (LAW 753).
663 Immigration Law2-3 sem. hrs
This course will serve as an introduction to the field of United States immigration and naturalization law. It will focus on the history of Immigration laws, immigrant and non-immigrant visa status, citizenship, exclusion, detention and removal, relief from removal, asylum, and immigration laws broader implications on homeland security, national security, and economic policies.
664 Immigration Clinic3 sem. hrs.
The Immigration Clinic will provide students with skill-focused instruction by providing direct legal assistance to clients. Clinic students will be sworn into limited practice and will represent non-citizens seeking various forms of immigration relief; Asylum, Adjustment of Status, Waivers, U visas, relief under the Violence Against Women Act, T visas and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status. Clinic students may represent clients before federal agencies including the US Department of Justice Immigration Court and the Board of Immigration Appeals and US Citizenship and Immigration Services, the immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the US Customs and Border Protection within the Department of Homeland Security. Each student will be required to complete 135 hours of clinical work and a weekly one hour class component. Enrollment is limited and is determined through an application process. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 45 credit hours.
665 White Collar Crime and Business Fraud2 sem. hrs.
This course will examine how business fraud, white collar crime, and regulatory violations are investigated and litigated in the courts and in administrative proceedings. This course will focus on the role played by various law enforcement agencies in conducting investigations and how prosecutors work with agencies to develop a case. Case studies will allow students to understand the strategies employed by prosecutors and defense counsel in preparing and presenting their cases, applicable penalties, and how negotiations are conducted during the course of the proceeding.
667 Fraud and Fraud Investigation Seminar3 sem. hrs.
In recent years statutory and common law fraud actions have filled the courts and the news. Fraud constitutes an increasing concern and target for litigation and enforcement actions. New definitions, procedures and enforcement mechanisms have changed the face of fraud investigation and prosecution. This Seminar will touch on traditional areas of fraud investigation and prosecution along with emerging statutory and common law fraud issues. It may consider both academic and practical aspects on the definition, identification, and redress of fraud and fraud-related issues. It may also cover practical issues of cooperation with government inquiry, and the waiver of privilege. The seminar will have a substantial and comprehensive research project culminating in a paper of high quality that will satisfy the writing requirement .
671 Comparative Health Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course illuminates important concepts and themes in health law by considering them from competing national and international perspectives. The course begins with the question of whether there is (or ought to be) a right to access basic health care services and, if so, from where does that right derive (international law, national constitutions, domestic legislation, etc.). The course then shifts to exploring various types of health care delivery systems employed by different nations. Additional topics include comparative analysis of approaches to medical malpractice, reproductive rights, and issues of global public health concern such as epidemics.
672 Appellate Courts2 sem. hrs.
This course will discuss how appellate judges decide cases, survey the technical legal knowledge that an appellate lawyer or appellate law clerk would need to perform effectively, and address the conflict between what an appellate court does when it makes rules as opposed to what it does when it settles disputes.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
673 Elder Law3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to provide students with a basic foundation for providing legal services to older persons. Because the specialty of elder law is defined by the type of client served rather than by a particular area of law, the subjects covered overlap with certain topics covered in other courses, such as Administrative Law, Medical Malpractice and Health Care Litigation, Wills and Estates, and Trusts. Topics covered in the Elder Law course will include such things as age discrimination, basic estate planning, entitlement to public benefits, planning for health and long-term care needs, challenges presented by physical or mental incapacity, exploitation of the elderly, end-of-life decisions, and ethical problems related to representing the elderly.
674 Health Care Law3 sem. hrs.
This course is a survey of fundamental legal issues related to the health care industry. It provides an introduction to the many issues with which lawyers working in the health care industry need to be familiar, and serves as a foundation for those students wishing to take additional, more in-depth courses in health law. Coverage will include the structure of the health care system, regulatory issues such as licensing, staff privileges, accreditation and certificates of need; antitrust; ERISA; government payor issues (Medicare and Medicaid); HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act); fraud and abuse (including Anti-Kickback and STARK I & II regulations) ; the legal obligation to provide treatment (including EMTALA); and health care reform.
675 Medical Malpractice and Health Care Litigation2 sem. hrs.
An in-depth study of the practical considerations and specialized rules which lawyers need to employ when handling medical malpractice cases. The course will not only concentrate on various theories of tort actions, but also on practical and policy considerations that may be involved in all of those actions such as insurance coverage, emotional distress, damages, standards of proof (including the use of forensic medicine and expert witnesses), apportionment of fault, determination of causation, and special duties. Additional topics may include tort reform issues, compliance and internal investigations, technology litigation, managed care litigation, and ERISA preemption.
676 Education Law2 or 3 sem. hrs.
? ? This course examines education law principles as they pertain to both public and private institutions of learning, the power of the state to compel school attendance, the?constitutional framework within which the state and federal governments regulate?both public and private educational institutions, and the statutory and other protections?of an individual?s right to equal treatment in the educational context without regard to race, sex, or disability.
677 Trusts3 sem. hrs.
The character, creation, validity and use of trusts; types of trusts; rights, duties and liabilities of settlors, trustees, beneficiaries and third parties; fiduciary administration; settlement and distribution; remedies of beneficiaries; tax, real property and future interest considerations.

Prerequisite: Wills and Estates (LAW 618).
678 Appellate Procedure *3 sem. hrs.
The course deals with the functions of appellate review, preserving issues for appeal, appealability, use of extraordinary writs, parties, initiating and perfecting an appeal, relief pending appeal, the record on appeal, the theory of brief writing and oral argument, judgments and mandates.

Note:This course has not been offered in the last three years. We have kept it in the catalog after a faculty review because we have plans to offer it in the next two years.
679 Criminal Practice3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to provide a working familiarity with the procedural rules governing conduct of a criminal case at the trial court and appeal levels, and the practical operation and tactical consideration of the rules. Course includes specific topics such as discovery, grand jury selection, jurisdiction, venue, guilty pleas, preliminary hearings, and post-conviction procedures. Course includes argument and preparation of motions and participation in exercises involving criminal trial issues. This course is intended to provide a practical background for those students who are interested in the prosecution and/or defense of criminal felonies.

Corequisite: LAW 562 - Criminal Procedure
680 Pretrial Practice2 sem. hrs.
The course covers litigation planning, the preparation of pleadings and motions, discovery practice, and pretrial conferences. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with pretrial procedural problems.
681 Trial Practice4 sem. hrs.
The purpose of the course is to give the student actual practice in conducting simulated trials. The matters covered include voir dire, opening statements, examination and cross-examination of witnesses, introduction of exhibits, objections, jury instructions, and final arguments. The student is given an opportunity to participate as counsel in several simulated trial segments, followed by appearing as counsel in a complete simulated trial. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Prerequisite: Students must have 45 credits prior to taking this course. Evidence (LAW 623).
682 Federal Courts3 sem. hrs.
A study of the federal judicial system, including the jurisdiction of federal courts, and the function of the system within the federal union.
684 Supreme Court Role-Playing2-3 sem. hrs.
In the roles of advocates and Supreme Court Justices, students conduct argument in, and decide, cases pending before the United States Supreme Court. Each student-justice, in the role of a particular Supreme Court Justice, hears argument, participates in a conference on the cases with the other student justices, votes on the outcomes, and writes a judicial opinion in one or more of the cases. Each student-advocate also writes a memorandum identifying the key issues in the case and their likely resolution by the Court and each Justice. Students who wish to use the paper(s) prepared for this course toward satisfaction of the upper-level writing requirement may do so. Most students receive three hours of academic credit. Students who have already satisfied the upper-level writing requirement may apply to receive two hours of academic credit.
685 Alternative Dispute Resolution2 sem. hrs.
A study of mechanisms to resolve disputes as an alternative to adversarial litigation. Techniques to be considered include mediation, arbitration, early neutral evaluation, summary jury trials, and mini-trials. Mandatory, voluntary, binding, non-binding, court-annexed and private programs will be considered. This course may offer skills training to students in various ADR techniques through the use of in-class simulations. Criteria for selecting cases for diversion to specific ADR techniques and for evaluating the success of such techniques will be considered. The impact of ADR on the role of the advocate and the judge in an adversarial system, on parties and on caseload will also be discussed.
686 Removal Jurisdiction2 sem. hrs.
In this course, students will engage in an in-depth study of the removal statutes, and caselaw interpreting those statures. Specific topics covered include subject matter jurisdiction and procedure in removed actions, remand motions, appellate review of remand orders, and issues related to the removal and remand of class actions under the Class Action Fairness Act.

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I (LAW 625).
687 European Union Law ? Introduction2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an introduction to the legal system of the European Union as a supranational organization, its history and its institutions. In three parts the course will first focus on issues of Member States? sovereignty, European Union decision making and enforcement. Second, European Union policies and internal actions, specifically the internal market, free movement of goods, persons, services and capital will be analyzed. Third and finally, the European Union?s policies on judicial cooperation and external actions will be studied and the impact of these policies on the U.S. and U.S. business will be examined.
688 International Finance3 sem. hrs.
This course will cover issues related to international finance, transactions, policy, and regulations. The course will cover the international economic and financial environment in which firms operate, the elements of international financial transactions, the evolution of international financial markets, the costs and benefits of globalization and the structure and instruments of foreign exchange and Eurocurrency markets. The continuing expansion of U.S. capital market regulation is a major topic, as is the implementation of international accounting standards. While the approach of this course is rooted in government policy and regulation, it introduces students to basic financial concepts and transactions. The course evaluates regulatory and legislative reforms that followed in the wake of the international financial crisis of 2008-09.
689 Mediation Advocacy2 sem. hrs.
This course focuses on the perspective of the legal advocate in the mediation process. The course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and hands-on experience. The course materials and exercises will discuss different mediation models and mediator styles, mediator selection, attorney preparation, client preparation, as well as advocacy during the mediation session. Students will explore how rules of professional conduct and ethical standards impact mediations. Students will participate in class-based simulations, interactive role-playing, and post-mortem discussions.
690 Election Law2 sem. hrs.
This course explores constitutional, federal and state statutory and political aspects of the American electoral system, specifically examining the history of the voting rights struggle, campaign finance restrictions and election reform. The bulk of the course considers the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which some legal scholars have termed one of the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation ever passed, the Help America Vote Act of 2002, the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, the Federal Election Campaign Act and various related state laws.
691 Native American Law2 sem. hrs.
This course examines the systems of law that apply on Native American reservations and tribal lands and how laws are formulated, enforced, and adjudicated on these lands, with emphasis on the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.
692 Federal Pre-Trial Practice (Civil)2 sem. hrs.
This course primarily addresses civil-pretrial practice in federal court. General subject areas include the most common application of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Local Rules for the Northern and Southern Districts of Mississippi. Instruction will take the student from the initial phases of a case through the jury selection process. Classes will be a mix of lectures and hands-on practice, including participation in case management conferences, pretrial conferences, and voir dire.
692 Federal Pre-Trial Practice (Civil)2 sem. hrs.
This course primarily addresses civil-pretrial practice in federal court. General subject areas include the most common application of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Local Rules for the Northern and Southern Districts of Mississippi. Instruction will take the student from the initial phases of a case through the jury selection process. Classes will be a mix of lectures and hands-on practice, including participation in case management conferences, pretrial conferences, and voir dire.
693 Construction Law
A study of the unique legal principles and concepts that arise in a construction project. Coverage includes the roles and responsibility of various participants in the construction process including owners, architects/engineers, contractors, subcontractors, and sureties. The course will focus on issues related to contracting, financing, site safety, and statutory/ common law remedies available to the various participants
701 International Human Rights3 sem. hrs.
This is an introductory survey course on international human rights law and theory. The course will begin by analyzing the concept of human rights and its philosophical underpinnings. It will then look at the historical antecedents and current sources of international human rights law. The course will also consider global, regional, and national organizations and mechanisms for the protection of human rights.
702 Estate, Gift and Generation-Skipping Taxation3 sem. hrs.
An introductory study of the federal estate, gift and generation-skipping transfer tax concepts.
703 Judicial Administration3 sem. hrs.
A study of the system from which justice is sought, social issues affected by court actions, alternative dispute resolution, judicial selection, tenure and discipline, modernizing methods for efficiency and administration of the courts, field surveys, research and analysis.
705 International Law3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces students to fundamental principles of international law, as well as other selected topics traditionally identified as part of public international law. The topics to be covered include the traditional theories, concepts, and sources of international law; the role of international law in the United States; international dispute resolution; statehood and international and regional entities, including the United Nations; principles of jurisdiction; the act of state doctrine and foreign sovereign immunity; and international human rights.
706 International Business Transactions2-3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces students to fundamental international business law principles and concepts. The course will provide a general overview of how international business contracts are formed and performed. International trade organizations and agreements will also be covered, such as the World Trade Organization, regional trade agreements (e.g., NAFTA), and international trade conventions. Domestic laws (primarily U.S.) governing international business transactions also will be discussed, including those involving trade embargoes, import and export controls, anti-bribery laws, and foreign investment controls.
707 Civil Law Obligations3 sem. hrs.
This course deals with the general principles of civil law applicable to contracts including their classification, formation, effects, extinction, and remedies for nonperformance. The course includes comparisons to common law contracts.
708 Civil Law of Persons and Family3 sem. hrs
This course covers the Louisiana law of persons and family, including domicile, marriage, separation, divorce, filiation, parental authority and obligations, custody, tutorship, emancipation, interdiction, and other familial rights and obligations.
709 Civil Law of Successions and Donations3 sem. hrs.
This course treats the civilian approach to the transfer of property by inheritance or by testament and the transfer of property by gifts during life.
710 Securities Regulation3 sem. hrs.
A study of laws relating to creation, issuance, ownership and transfer of securities, including problems of the issuer, investor and control agencies and institutions; securities markets and exchanges; duties and liabilities of dealers, brokers, underwriters and sellers; control persons; the Securities and Exchange Commission and its functions; and so-called ?blue-sky? laws.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619).
711 Civil Law Property3 sem. hrs.
This course covers fundamental concepts of civil law property. Topics include things, ownership, usufruct, servitudes, boundaries, occupancy, possession and prescription. The course includes comparisons to common law property.
712 Admiralty2-3 sem. hrs.
A study of the basic law of the sea, with primary emphasis on the pertinent federal rules, principles and statutes, including vessel liens, mortgages, shipping documents, insurance, salvage, collision liability, seafarer's rights in injury or death, maritime jurisdiction, constitutional considerations, and special international maritime transactions.
713 Louisiana Security Devices3 sem. hrs.
This course covers the provisions of the Louisiana Civil Code and statutes relating to suretyship, pledge, creditors' privileges, mortgages, chattel mortgages, deposit and sequestration.
714 Business Planning3 sem. hrs.
A study of the organization and conduct of business in partnership,corporate, and hybrid forms. Students are called upon to analyze situations and assess alternative methods. Includes organization of new businesses, and the purchase and sale of a business. The tax ramifications of these transactions will also be included.

Prerequisite: Business Associations I (LAW 619) and Federal Taxation Law (LAW 638).
715 Legislation2-3 sem. hrs.
A study of the legislative process, the interrelationships of the separate branches of government, lobbying, judge-made law, statutory construction, use and analysis of legislative materials and resources, legislative drafting techniques and procedures, including a skills component.
716 Children in the Legal System3 sem. hrs.
This course examines the status of children in society and under the law primarily by examining the relationship between children, their parents and the state. Issues such as corporal punishment in schools, free speech, compulsory school attendance, minors? abortions, traditional juvenile justice materials, child custody and dependency, neglect and abuse are addressed.
717 Louisiana Civil Procedure3 sem. hrs.
This course is a survey of Louisiana civil procedure. The course examines the Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure and covers jurisdiction, venue, judicial power and authority, court officers, actions, parties, pleadings, citation and service of process, discovery, trial judgments, post-trial modification of judgments, appellate procedure, execution of judgments, summary and executory proceedings, probate procedure, and special proceedings.
718 Civil Law Matrimonial Regimes2 sem. hrs.
This course examines the law governing ownership and management of property of married persons in Louisiana. The course includes the examination of the rights and obligations between spouses under legal and contractual matrimonial regimes provided in Louisiana law; the creation, modification, and dissolution of matrimonial regimes; classification of property as community or separate; and the rights of third persons with respect to property of married persons. Comparisons to the laws of other jurisdictions will be considered as well.
719 International Commercial Arbitration Seminar2-3 sem. hrs
This course will examine the basics of the law of international commercial arbitration. Specifically, the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration as a means of international dispute resolution will be discussed, including issues related to the proper drafting of arbitration agreements, questions of arbitrability, as well as the rendering, recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards under international conventions and the laws of the United States. Special attention will be given to the rules and practice of the leading international arbitration institutions, such as the International Court of Arbitration of the ICC, the London Court of International Arbitration, the American Arbitration Association, the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, and the ICSID, as well as the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules and the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration. There will be classroom discussions and simulations on various issues arising in international commercial arbitration. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
720 Antitrust3 sem. hrs.
The law and economics of cartels and exclusionary business practices. The course focuses on sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Act and sections 3 and 7 of the Clayton Act. The practices considered include price-fixing, territorial allocation schemes, mergers, monopolization, boycotts, tying arrangements, and vertical integration. Students are expected to master some elementary methods of economic analysis, but no background in economics is required.
721 Introduction to Intellectual Property3 sem. hrs.
This survey course examines the protection of proprietary rights in inventions, literary works and other forms of creative expression, software, trade secrets, trade designations, and other intangible intellectual products. Students in this course will analyze federal patent, copyright, trademark and unfair competition law, and state trade secrecy and unfair competition laws. This course will also evaluate the challenges posed for traditional intellectual property paradigms by new technologies and the shift to an information-based economy. Students with a general interest in intellectual property as well as students with a specialized interest in patent, copyright, and trademark laws may take this course.
722 Copyright3 sem. hrs.
An in-depth study of the federal law of intellectual property relating to Copyright. The doctrine of federal preemption of state law and relevant international protocol are also covered.
723 Trademarks and Unfair Competition3 sem. hrs.
A study of the law of trademarks, unfair competition, trade secrets, the right of publicity, protection of ideas and related business torts. Emphasis is given to study of the Lanham Act and related state statutory and common law doctrines governing this area of intellectual property.
724 Patent Law3 sem. hrs.
This course covers core concepts of patent law under U.S. patent laws and international conventions for the protection of patents. This course will introduce students to the law and policies surrounding the protection of inventions in the useful arts as well as trade secrets and idea protection through contracts and confidentiality agreements. Students will consider the importance of patents in competitive market economies, industrial use of cross-licenses and patent pools, use of restrictive licenses and government patent buy-outs. Students will study legal principles of novelty, nonobviousness, utility, infringement and remedies under patent law and policy analysis of the patent system in general. There are no prerequisites for this course, and no technical background is required.
725 Advanced Copyright Law3 sem. hrs.
This course evaluates the copyright system as a legal institution to promo the scientific and artistic progress within society, and considers whether copyright laws passed by Congress and interpreted by the courts achieves this fundamental Constitutional goal. This course will study the historical background to the copyright system, its economic foundations, and the social, cultural and industrial impacts of the copyright system as it aims to facilitate the development of knowledge and information in society. Students will be encouraged to critically examine the copyright system as a legally constructed tool to address ideas of authorship, creativity, private property rights, the public domain, and the protection of literary and artistic works. The course will also look at the effect technological changes have had, and will have, on the law, copyright markets, and the creative content industries. Course requirements are a written paper and class room presentation at the end of the semester. There are no prerequisites to have taken copyright law for this course. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement. ?
726 Criminal Law - International and Comparative Perspectives2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will introduce students to the fields of International Criminal Law and Comparative Criminal Law. Additionally, it will look for commonalities of jurisprudence among international and domestic systems of criminal law. Grades will be based upon a single comprehensive final exam.
727 Complex Litigation *2 sem. hrs.
This is an advanced civil procedure course dealing with the special problems that arise in litigation involving multiple claims and multiple parties, including permissive and compulsory joinder, intervention, disposition of duplicative or related litigation, class actions, discovery in large cases, judicial control of complex litigation, and preclusion issues.
728 Civil Rights3 sem. hrs.
An examination of civil rights legislation,especially Reconstruction era acts, 42 U.S.C.section 1983 and the Court's interpretations. The course focuses on litigation to enforce civil rights, and considers remedies, defenses, immunities, damages and rights to attorney fees. The course also examines one or more historical civil rights movements and any continuing relevancy to current civil rights movements.
729 Selected Problems in Legal History2 sem. hrs.
Selected themes in American legal history with reference to English beginnings. The course involves selective problems such as the growth of constitutional law, the development of court systems, and 19th and 20th century reforms. Illustrative problems involve marriage and family, crime and punishment, relations between church and state, rights of children, and rights of the mentally disabled. As an alternative to this thematic approach, students may be assigned readings relating to the United States Supreme Court and parallel state judicial activities.

Note:Course not offered in the two previous academic years, nor to be offered in the current academic year.
730 Jurisprudence2-3 sem. hrs.
This course addresses issues concerning to the nature of law and its foundations. Is law based on morality or economic efficiency? Is law just a form of politics relating to class, race, or gender? Students will be introduced to the answers to these questions posed by the major schools of jurisprudence including natural law theory, legal positivism, legal realism, law and economics, critical legal studies, feminist legal theory, critical race theory, and postmodern legal theory. When taught as a study abroad course, the course will have a comparative focus, including the study of jurisprudential principles of Confucianism (Asian Law), Tribal Law, and Shari’a Law (Islamic Law). Students will explore the formative relationship between the history and culture and the legal philosophy associated with each of these traditions of jurisprudence.
731 Constitutional Law Seminar2-3 sem. hrs.
An in-depth treatment of contemporary constitutional issues relevant to a modern society.
732 Law and Literature2-3 sem. hrs.
Analysis of selected literary works to examine such issues as the nature and existence of justice, in the abstract, and the pursuit of justice by lawyers in regard to contemporary societal problems.
733 Seminar in American Legal History3 sem. hrs.
This seminar will explore the ways in which the law has influenced the course of American history and the impact of historical events and trends on legal development in the United States. Students will be introduced to a variety of methodological approaches employed by legal historians and will think critically about how law shapes and is shaped by changing social reality. Topics will include the close relationship between law and society in the Salem Witch Trials, the origins of judicial review, the law of slavery, the legal aspects of the American Civil War, changing conceptions of marriage in the United States, the rise of legal realism and the demise of legal formalism, expansion of federal government power during the New Deal, the rights revolution in the twentieth century, and the legal battle against segregation. Class meetings will consist primarily of discussion of reading assignments, which will be drawn from both primary and secondary sources. Students will write several reaction papers based on the readings for the class.
734 Government Contracting1-2 sem. hrs.
This survey course will cover the powers and limitations on government instrumentalities entering into contracts. The course will examine the statutory basis of the government contracting process at the Federal and State levels, including regulations, executive orders and sovereign immunity. Students will gain a basic understanding of public procurement methods, including the stages of requirements determination, solicitation, contract awarding, contract administration, dispute resolution and claims. In addition, the course will introduce students to concepts unique to government contracting, such as the right of termination for the convenience of the government. There will be classroom discussions on how to advise government contracting officers in awarding contracts and on how to advise private sector businesses seeking government contracts.
735 Civil Law Sales and Leases3 sem. hrs.
This course examines provisions of the Louisiana Civil Code and statutes dealing with sales, leases and related contracts.
736 Louisiana Mineral Law2-3 sem. hrs.
? This course involves the study of?mineral?law?in Louisiana, including such topics as ownership of mineral?rights, sales and reservations of?mineral?rights,?mineral?servitudes and leases, and unitization. Topics may also include other contracts pertaining to exploration, development, and production of?minerals, and conservation?laws?and regulations governing?minerals. Particular emphasis will be given to the Louisiana?Mineral?Code.
737 Mental Health Law2 sem. hrs.
738 International and Comparative Competition Law2-3 sem. hrs.
This course analyses compares competition/antitrust law regimes in the USA and the European Union.? The course will include analysis of legal and economic concepts of competition and a comparative examination of specific issues and selected significant areas of competition/antitrust law.? Areas of study may include prohibiting agreements or practices that restrict free trading and competition between businesses, banning abusive behavior by a firm dominating a market, or anti-competitive practices that tend to lead to such a dominant position and supervising the mergers and acquisitions of large corporations.
739 International and Comparative Contracts and Sales Law2 sem. hrs.
This course examines both the civil law approach to contracts in comparison to American contracts law, with a focus on?sales?law, and the laws governing?international?sales. Topics will include an introduction to?sales?in civil law jurisdictions, the United Nations?Sales?Convention (CSIG), UNIDROIT "Principles," choice of law applicable to?international?sales?contracts, the formation of?international?sales?contracts, performance of?international?sales?contracts,?and remedies (non-judicial and judicial).
741 Litigation Technology2 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to integrate technology into trial presentations. Students will learn how to apply principles of persuasion to the creation of courtroom visuals. The course will cover the preparation and effective use of electronic illustrative aids and demonstrative exhibits in trial.

Prerequisite: Trial Practice (LAW 681)
742 Electronically Stored Information (ESI) and E-Discovery1-2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on discovery of electronic information that is generated and stored in complex systems. Requests for, and disputes arising from, the preservation and production of electronic information have become common in the Federal civil justice system and in the Federal criminal justice system as well as in State courts. The course will introduce the student to how Federal and State courts address discovery of electronic information. The course will also examine issues arising from the confidentiality of electronic information, the ethical duties of attorneys with regard to that information, and the presentation of evidence in electronic format.? The material will be tested with a final examination. ?
747 Professional Responsibility and Ethics3 sem. hrs.
A problem/case approach to studying the ethical decisions facing the practicing attorney, with an emphasis on the goals, structure and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the Code of Judicial Conduct. Incorporated in the course is participation by the bench and bar.
748 Agricultural Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an introduction to the particular legal issues related to agriculture in today's society.? Topics will include:? regulation by the USDA, labor law as it relates to farms, tort liability of farmers, agricultural co-ops, land partition, Articles 2 and 9 of the UCC?as they relate to agriculture, international trade regulation, food safety, biotechnology related to agriculture, and water and land resource issues.
749 Conflict of Laws3 sem. hrs.
A comprehensive study of the body of law that applies to legal relationships and disputes that have connections to more than one state or country. This course focuses on the main approaches to choice of law (the law that courts apply in disputes where more than one law might apply), constitutional issues related to choice of law, and enforcement of judgments.
750 Media Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on the media's ability to gain access to information from meetings of public bodies (aka "Sunshine Laws"), the defamation standards that apply to media publishing, the extent to which members of the media are able to keep their sources confidential (aka "reporters privilege"), privacy rights of people involved in media reporting, requirements and procedures that must be followed to close a court proceeding and/or court records, and the rules involving the modern phenomena of allowing the public to comment anonymously by electronic means on media stories.
751 Church and State in the Modern World2 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to be an intensive, short-form class that focuses on modern, cutting edge issues of religious liberty in the United States and abroad. Its principal focus is on the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment, focusing on recent disputes in a number of areas: the regulation of religious practice, the funding of religious institutions, government endorsement of religious messages, and the appropriateness of religion in politics. The class also covers some cases and controversies from abroad, particularly in how they compare with issues in the United States.
752 Consumer Bankruptcy2 sem. hrs.
This course will concentrate on Chapters 7 and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code, and focus on the unique issues which arise when an individual with primarily consumer debts files for bankruptcy, including consideration of such topics as the conflicting principles of fresh start vs. maximum return to creditors; good faith and substantial abuse; the automatic stay; property of the estate; exemptions and the discharge of debts; Chapter 13 plans; serial Chapter 13 filings, and conversion of cases from one chapter of the Bankruptcy Code to another. Grades are based upon a final examination.
753 Bankruptcy3 sem. hrs.
This course will provide a comprehensive survey of basic bankruptcy law. The course will focus primarily on consumer bankruptcy and introduce business bankruptcy. The course will touch on the economic, political, and ethical issues underlying bankruptcy's competing goals: providing overextended consumer and business debtors with a fresh start and satisfying creditors' claims in an orderly, fair way.

Corequisite: Secured Transactions and Creditors? Rights (LAW 621).
754 Consumer Law2 sem. hrs.
This course will consider a number of statutory and common law regulations and remedies providing for the protection of consumers, with emphasis on topics not otherwise covered in the law school curriculum. Coverage may include fraud and deceptive sales practices, remedies, fair access to credit, truth in lending, usury, debt collection, and credit reporting regulation.
755 Administrative Law3 sem. hrs.
A study of the basic principles of administrative law, including primary jurisdiction, exhaustion, ripeness, scope of review, and the decision-making process.
756 Law & Morality Seminar3 sem. hrs.
The course begins with a survey of the principal competing Western moral theories and debates concerning the nature and source of moral rights and duties. Students will then be introduced to different problems concerning intersections of law and morality: Is an unjust ?law? really a law? Should all moral wrongs be illegal? Should the law impose a duty to save or help others in emergencies? How should morality inform the law concerning issues of life (e.g., abortion) and death (e.g., euthanasia)? Should judges decide cases based on their moral convictions? What are the moral aims and limits of criminal punishment? Do we have a moral obligation to obey the law? When are civil disobedience and conscientious objection justified? The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
757 Juvenile Legal Issues Seminar3 sem. hrs.
This seminar examines issues that affect minors ? from the very young to older teenagers. In a participatory seminar format, it includes the adoption process to include adoptions from overseas locations; the termination of parental rights and the basis for such court action both in youth court and in chancery court; issues involving children while in a school setting to include truancy; the resolution of criminal issues involving children to include the use of youth court, drug court and teen court; and issues surrounding child custody and child support of children. The required paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
758 Local Government Law3 sem. hrs.
This course examines the legal and political relationships that govern the provision of goods and services by local governments. The specific topics covered include the sources of local government power, incorporation and annexation, home rule, racial and economic implications of local policy, state pre-emption of local ordinances, conflicts between cities and suburbs, property taxation, user fees, municipal finance, and citizen participation in government.
760 Negotiation Seminar2 sem. hrs.
Introduction to principles and techniques in the areas of negotiation, interviewing and client counseling with emphasis on application of these interactive skills to problems confronting lawyers in their daily practice.
762 Seminar2-3 sem. hrs.
Small classes designed to focus on a specific area of the law selected by the professor. A paper is required in lieu of an examination. The seminar is the primary method of satisfying the writing requirement. Specific seminar offerings will be designated in the registration materials each semester.
763 Gender and the Law Seminar2-3 sem. hrs.
This seminar includes both a historic review of the role of women as determined by the law and a modern survey of changing roles of women as citizens, employees, litigants, lawyers, judges, wives, and mothers. Readings are assigned in the writings of legal scholars, in cases, and in statutes to demonstrate how the law views women in the workplace, women and the family, women and their bodies, women and education, and women and political power. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
764 Law and Religion Seminar3 sem. hrs.
This seminar will introduce students to the central issues and theorists in the current debate regarding the relationship between law and religion in a pluralistic democratic society. In particular, the course will concentrate on a question that has received less attention in this debate: What, if any, is the role of religious beliefs in judicial decision making? In addition to analyzing these issues from the perspective of the religion clauses of First Amendment of the United States Constitution, these issues will be engaged more broadly from the perspectives of jurisprudence (philosophy of law), historical analysis, social theory, and political theory. These various perspectives will provide an opportunity to analyze the relationship between law and religion from a broad standpoint and will provide a framework for unpacking the presuppositions about law and religion that different theorists bring to this debate. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
765 Legal Theory Seminar *3 sem. hrs.
This seminar explores classical and contemporary issues in legal theory. What makes a law legitimate? Is law based on morality or is it a matter of social convention or politics? Should judges rely on the law or extra-legal norms for deciding hard cases? Readings will vary from year to year. Some years the emphasis will be on earlier theorists such as Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Kant, Bentham, Llewellyn, etc. Other years will focus on contemporary theorists such as Ronald Dworkin, Richard Posner, Joseph Raz, Catharine MacKinnon, Robin West, Roberto Unger, and John Finnis. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.

Note:This course has not been offered in the last three years. We have kept it in the catalog after a faculty review because we have plans to offer it in the next two years.
767 Race and the Law3 sem. hrs.
This seminar includes both a historic study of race and the law and a consideration of contemporary topics in the area. The study and discussion of these topics are facilitated by using both traditional legal resources and non-traditional resources, such as slave narratives, excerpts from writings during the Reconstruction era, and readings from the civil rights era. Students prepare a paper in this course and present their work to the class. The paper in this course satisfies the writing requirement.
768 Seminar on Issues of Criminal Law and Procedure3 sem. hrs.
Students may pick their own topic relating to criminal law or procedure. They may also choose to participate in the Mississippi Criminal Law Reform project, in which case, they will be assigned a research project that will be used by the Judicial Advisory Committee to recommend changes in the penal code. All students will be required to produce at least a 20 page paper that will satisfy the writing requirement and present two oral reports on the subject of the paper.
770 Legal Extern Program3 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for- profit organization, or a government agency. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for two non-classroom credit hours.)

Prerequisite: Students must complete 45 semester hours in order to enroll in Legal Extern Program 770.
771 Legal Extern Program II3 sem. hrs.
See Legal Extern Program LAW 770 for description. Legal Extern Program II is the designated course for those students who take a second local externship for credit. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for two non-classroom credit hours.)
772 Remote Legal Extern Program I3 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for-profit office, or a government agency located outside the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component which will be fulfilled through distance learning. Students who take this course may not take Legal Extern Program II LAW 771 or Remote Legal Extern Program II LAW 776. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for two non-classroom credit hours.)

Prerequisite: Students must complete 45 semester hours in order to enroll in Legal Extern Program 772.
773 Faith and the Practice of the Law2 sem. hrs.
This seminar will explore issues dealing with the relationship between the lawyer's religious faith and the practice of law. Consideration will be given to the intersection between the demands of the modern law practice and the lawyer's faith and values, and whether one can and how one can practice law in a manner consistent with one's faith and values. A variety of readings dealing with how one's faith perspective impacts one's practice will be used in the course. Students will complete a paper on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. This seminar does not satisfy the writing requirement.
774 Law and Economics Seminar2 sem. hrs.
This course draws from various areas of the common law - property, contract, tort and criminal ? to examine economic theory as it applies to various legal problems. The economic analysis of law is a strong analytical tool for legal reasoning; students in this course will be encouraged to apply economic concepts to deepen their understanding of how the legal system as an institution functions in society. This course will also cover public regulation of the market, income and wealth distribution, the legal process, and the Constitution and the federal system. A background in economics is not a prerequisite.
775 Cyberlaw Seminar3 sem. hrs.
This course studies different aspects of the law that applies to the Internet and to the underlying software technologies forming networks to connect society, cultures and businesses in the real world. Students will have the opportunity to examine timely legal issues that pertain to emerging industries, cultures and communities, which are connected through a digital medium of online networks and virtual societies in cyberspace and the Internet. The course will examine the protection of underlying software technologies, the governance of transactions over the Internet, and the interaction and relationships among individuals and communities in the virtual world. The course will also look at tools and mechanisms that are available for private ordering of rights and self-regulation that are not available in real space and time. Course requirements are a written paper and class room presentation at the end of the semester. There are no technical prerequisites for the course. The required paper will satisfy the writing requirement.
776 Remote Legal Extern Program II5 or 6 sem. hrs.
A small, selective program providing for a closely supervised externship with a judicial office, a not-for-profit office, or a government agency located outside the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. The program focuses on practical experience, is under the supervision of a faculty member, and includes a substantive classroom component which will be fulfilled through distance learning. Students who take this course may not take Legal Extern Program LAW 770, Legal Extern Program II LAW 771 or Remote Legal Extern Program I LAW 772. The credit earned in this course will count as experiential learning credit.

Note:(Note: This course counts for four non-classroom credit hours.)

Prerequisite: Students must complete 45 semester hours in order to enroll in Legal Extern Program 776.
778 Regulated Industries2 sem. hrs.
This course will survey regulated industries and activities to examine the regulatory framework under which they operate and will study how governing regulations are formulated and administered. The regulated industries that will be examined may include insurance, gaming, healthcare, banking & finance, corporations & securities, and various regulated professions. This course does not satisfy the writing requirement.
779 Local Government Practice: Land Development Process2-3 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an in-depth examination of the inner workings of local governments and the parties that interact with local governments as they seek to develop land. It will review both legal requirements and strategic considerations for all of the various entities involved (i.e. public bodies, corporate authorities, developers). The course will use role-play as the class will mimic the chambers of a public body. The students will take on the roles of private parties and public officials as businesses appeal to the public bodies and make their requests for assistance or permission to develop their projects. This course is designed for students with an interest in real estate development, government advisory work, and public finance. It will focus on the practical aspects of representing local governments as well as representing those who appear before, or seek relief from, local governments.
780 Basic Real Estate Transactions3 sem. hrs.
This course serves as an introduction to contractual, priority of right, and title assurance issues involved with transferring real estate. The course will cover the life cycle of a residential real estate purchase from the pre-contract period through closing. Course material includes an introduction to residential real estate markets and professionals, the title system, mortgages and deeds of trust, foreclosures, land contracts, liens, ownership forms, residential loan closings, and an introduction to selected basic commercial real estate issues.
781 Real Estate Finance and Development2 sem. hrs.
Commercial real estate transactions including real estate brokerage, execution and breach of real estate contracts, usury, condominiums and cooperatives, sale-leaseback financing, shopping center leases and development, ground leases and mortgages, federal income tax aspects of real estate development.
782 Real Estate Practice2 sem. hrs.
This is a practical study in land title examination, certification and curative work. Course material includes mortgages and deeds of trust, foreclosures, land contracts, liens, ownership forms, residential loan closings, and an introduction to oil and gas title opinion drafting and title litigation.
783 Status of Forces Agreements Seminar1-2 sem. hrs.
This seminar will focus on the international agreements used when the United States stations its forces in another country. Students will examine how these agreements are administered using the Status of Forces Agreements negotiated with Germany and Korea as the primary teaching vehicles. The seminar will examine how signatories work within the agreements to satisfy the needs of each signatory and how they adapt the agreements to deal with changed circumstances and conditions to avoid renegotiation of the agreements.
785 Drafting for Business Transactions2 sem. hrs.
A study of the fundamentals of legal drafting in the context of transactional practice, utilizing exercises in drafting a variety of legal instruments for business transactions.
786 Mississippi Practice3 sem. hrs.
A study of practice in Mississippi Circuit, County and Chancery Courts, from the commencement of the action through final judgment and execution. The course will emphasize the differences in practice and procedure in County, Chancery and Circuit Courts. Court jurisdiction and competence, equitable remedies and the special powers of the Chancery Court are studied, as is enforcement of judgments. The scope and substance of the Mississippi Rules of Civil Procedure and of Evidence are considered, particularly in areas where those rules differ from rules applicable to practice in federal courts.
789 Law Office Management2 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to expose the prospective practitioner to the economic realities of the practice of law. Covered in the course are such matters as the location of the law office, the economical furnishing thereof, the position of the attorney in the office with respect to opening practice, the purchase of law books, office equipment, bookkeeping and accounting, client relations, and other associated subjects.
790 Special Projects I1 sem. hr.
This program is designed to allow students to pursue legal studies outside the structure of the prescribed curriculum under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The student may be involved in a designated project, a tutorial, or other independent research. Whether a written project is required is subject to the discretion of the supervising faculty member, but in any event an accountability exercise is required. Before registering for this course, a student is required to prepare a description of the project and obtain permission of the supervising faculty member and the dean.
790 Special Projects IA1 sem. hr.
Same as LAW 790, but graded on a pass/fail basis. Whether a student enrolls in this course or LAW 790 is within the discretion of the supervising faculty member, and the election must be made at the time the student registers for the course.
791 Special Projects II2 sem. hrs.
Same as LAW 790 but requiring substantially more work.
791 Special Projects IIA2 sem. hrs.
Same as LAW 791 but graded on a pass/fail basis. Whether a student enrolls in this course or LAW 791 is within the discretion of the supervising faculty member, and the election must be made at the time the student registers for the course.
794 Electronic Research Seminar2 sem. hrs.
This course will focus on the effective use of the Internet for legal research. Students will learn when to use the Internet for research, how to evaluate sites and content, what resources are available on the Internet, and how to formulate effective search strategies. Because students will receive hands-on training in the Library computer lab, enrollment is limited to fifteen students. Grading will be based on research assignments, class participation and a short paper (10-15 pages) that critically evaluates electronic legal resources in a selected subject area. This seminar will satisfy the writing requirement if the student chooses to write a paper that conforms to the catalog requirements.
795 Writing Requirement2 sem. hrs.
This course is open to students who have completed the first-year curriculum and need to fulfill the advanced writing requirement as described under the Required Courses after the First Year section of this catalog. The program requires in-depth individual study and research of selected topics under the supervision of a full-time member of the faculty culminating in a paper of high quality. Before registering for this course, the student shall identify the topic to be researched and gain prior approval of supervising faculty member. At the conclusion of the semester, the student must attach an abstract of his paper to his instrument of certification. Special permission from the dean is required.
797 Advanced Legal Research and Writing3 sem. hrs.
An intensive study of advanced legal research methods and how those methods support scholarly writing. Special emphasis is given to research in legislative and administrative materials. Competency in research and writing skills is demonstrated through a substantial and comprehensive research project culminating in a paper of high quality.
798 Advanced Legal Analysis3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to help students review important legal concepts in bar-related subjects and to build on analytical, writing, and organizational skills necessary for the bar exam. While the most intense preparation for the bar exam occurs during the weeks immediately prior to the examination, this course will prepare students for that period of study.

Note:Although designed to assist students with bar examination preparation, this course is not considered a substitute for the comprehensive commercial bar review courses.
901 Academic Legal Writing for Foreign Lawyers2 sem. hrs.
This 3 credit summer course is required for all LL.M. students. Enrollment is limited to foreign post-graduate students. The goal of the course is to teach students U.S. legal terminology and English composition skills in order to enable them to write correctly within U.S. legal studies, the U.S. work place or when representing a U.S. client in their home countries. Students submit article or case summaries twice weekly, allowing them to improve their writing skills. The summaries will be discussed in small groups. There will be an exam at the end of the course and before the start of the fall semester. Students must earn at least a ?C? grade to pass. Passing is a condition for fall and spring course registration and enrollment.
902 Introduction to American Law2 sem. hrs.
This 3 credit summer course is required for all LL.M. students. Enrollment is limited to foreign post-graduate students. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of the American legal system, the development and structure. It will provide an introduction to Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, torts, LAW?573?-?Property, contracts and business law, civil procedure, Evidence, Criminal Procedure and LAW 755. Students may be called upon and will have to prepare a paper, which they will present. The final exam is a 24 hour take-home exam at the end of the course and before the start of the fall semester. Students must earn at least a ?C? grade to pass. Passing is a condition for fall and spring course registration and enrollment.
903 American Legal System I1 sem. hr.
This course builds upon Introduction to American Law and focuses on using American case law, statutes and regulations to increase students? understanding of core concepts in American law, such as Federalism, precedent and analogical reasoning. Enrollment is limited to foreign LL.M. students.
904 American Legal System II1 sem. hr.
This course builds upon the greater understanding of core American legal concepts achieved in American Legal System I. In American Legal System II, students will continue to develop their ability to identify and analyze precedent and use advanced analogical reasoning, evaluate the primary schools of American jurisprudence and develop basic advocacy skills. Enrollment is limited to foreign LL.M. students.
920 Masters Level Course in Trial Advocacy or Appellate Advocacy3 sem. hrs.
The best way to hone skills is to practice them, model them and teach them to others. The Master Level Trial Advocacy Course and the Masters Level Appellate Advocacy Course provide the perfect opportunity for students in the Advocacy LL.M. to do just that. In this course, 1-2 students will work with the supervising professor to prepare course exercises for either Trial Advocacy or Legal Writing III (Appellate Advocacy). They will model the various courtroom skills for students. They will also be trained in how to evaluate and critique courtroom performances and will provide one on one counseling to JD students to improve their performances (under the supervision of the professor). Throughout the course, the student will assemble a portfolio of the lessons they created/edited, a video portfolio of their model performances and multiple reflection essays. Grading will be based on their actions in the classroom as well as their portfolio.
995 LL.M. Thesis Course0 sem. hrs.
Foreign LL.M. students may enroll in this course to revise their completed writing requirement into a thesis. As a prerequisite for this course, the professor who supervises the student?s writing requirement must have determined that the paper is of high enough quality to be revised into a thesis. In addition, the Director of the LL.M. Program must approve the student?s enrollment in this course. The Director or the LL.M. Program is responsible for supervising revision of the writing requirement, but both the Director and the original faculty member who supervised the student?s writing requirement must approve the final document being labeled as a thesis. The title of the thesis will be listed on the student?s transcript. The law school will retain a copy of each document that is successfully designated an LL.M. Thesis. ?

Prerequisite: ?1) This course is restricted to foreign LL.M. students. 2) A foreign LL.M. student wishing to enroll in this course must have completed the minimum 2-credit writing requirement as part of a seminar or special project. 3) The faculty member who supervises the student?s writing requirement must determine that the paper is of high enough quality that it can be revised into a thesis. 4) The Director of the LL.M. Program must approve the student?s enrollment in this course.

Administration, Staff, and Faculty

Deans

SCOTT, WENDY B. (2014)
Dean and The Henry Vaughan Watkins and Selby Watkins McRae Professor of Law
B.A., Harvard University; J.D., New York University; former Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, North Carolina Central University School of Law; former Vice Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, Tulane Law School. Ms. Scott joined the Tulane faculty as Professor after a successful career in labor law and public interest civil rights advocacy. From 1980 to 1984, she served as a Staff Attorney at the Legal Action Center of the City of New York.

WILL, JONATHAN (2009)
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Faculty Development, Professor of Law and Director, Bioethics and Health Law Center
B.A., summa cum laude, Canisius College; M.A., magna cum laude, J.D., magna cum laude, University of Pittsburgh, Executive Editor, Pittsburgh Law Review, Order of the Coif; former adjunct professor, University of Pittsburgh; former associate, Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; admitted to practice in Pennsylvania (inactive); affiliate faculty, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities, University of Mississippi Medical Center.

BENNETT, RICHARD T. (1975)
Assistant Dean for Adjunct Faculty
B.A., M.A., Mississippi College; J.D., University of Mississippi; Bennett, Lotterhos, Sulser & Wilson

McINTOSH, PHILLIP L. (1991)
Associate Dean for International Programs and Professor of Law
B.S., magna cum laude, Louisiana State University; J.D., Louisiana State University; Order of the Coif; LL.M., New York University; former partner, Snellings, Breard, Sartor, Inabnett & Trascher, Monroe, Louisiana; former law clerk to Hon. Cecil C. Cutrer, Circuit Judge of the Court of Appeal for the Third Circuit, Louisiana; member, Louisiana State, Capital Area, and American Bar Associations.

MILLER, MARY E. (1999)
Assistant Dean for Information, Technology, and Research
B.A., Asbury College; M.L.S., University of Southern Mississippi; J.D., Mississippi College; former State Law Librarian, Mississippi State Law Library.

Special Designations

BLACK, HENRY H (2014)
Distinguished Senior Advisor, Mission First Legal Aid Office; B.A. University of Mississippi; J.D., University of Mississippi; former District Counsel, Vicksburg District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

DILLARD, CHET (2009)
Distinguished Senior Advisor, Mission First Legal Aid Office; B.S, University of Southern Mississippi; J.D., University of Mississippi; former Chancery Judge, Hinds County; former Commissioner of Public Safety, State of Mississippi.

ROBINSON, Lanny R. (2014)
Distinguished Senior Advisor, Mission First Legal Aid Office; J.D. Mississippi College School of Law; B.S. University of Southern Mississippi; Retired Deputy District Counsel, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg District.
 

Law School Staff

ANDERSON, PATRICIA (2004)
Executive Secretary to the Dean and Assistant Development Coordinator; B.S.B.A., Mississippi College

ARMSTRONG, JAY (2008)
Assistant Director of Admissions; A.A.S., Hinds Community College; B.S., Mississippi College

BANES, JACKIE (2000)
Financial Aid Coordinator; A.A., Copiah-Lincoln Community College; B.A., William Carey College; M.R.E., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

BURNETT, JUDY (2000)
Director of Law School Records

BURROUGHS, CHRISTINA (2006)
Financial Assistant

BUTLER, THORNE (2003)
Director of Development; A.B., Dartmouth College; M.Ed., Harvard University

COLE, BETHANY (2012)
Director of Public Relations and Communications, B.S., Mississippi College

COLE, BOBBIE (2012)
Admissions Coordinator; Study, Northwest Junior College

COOPER, JAMES (2007)
Maintenance Technician Part-time; A.A., Hinds Community College

CROTWELL, RONALD E. (2014)
Maintenance Assistant, Part-time; Associate Degree - Electronics from Phillips College, 1979

FRANKLIN, VICTORIA (2015)
Faculty Assistant

GANDY, PATRICIA (2006)
Director, Mission First Legal Aid Office; Adjunct Professor of Law; B.A., J.D., Mississippi College

GRAVES, HEATHER (2013)
Director for Alumni

GUY, BRENDA (2002)
Faculty Assistant; Study, Jones County Junior College

HICKS, CARLYN (2010)
Special Grant Attorney, Mission First Legal Aid Office; B.B.A., Jackson State University; J.D., Mississippi College School of Law

JOHNSON, SHERYL S. (2012)
Director of Career Services; B.A., M.A., Auburn University; J.D., Mississippi College School of Law

KELLY, AMANDA (2015)
Office Manager - Mission First

KILBY, VIRGINIA (2012)
Advocacy and Moot Court Assistant; B.S., Mississippi College

KING, STACY (2007)
Faculty Assistant; B.S., Mississippi College

MALONEY, MIKE (1981)
Special Assistant to the Dean; B.A., Notre Dame University; M.A., J.D., Mississippi College

MAY, GARY (2013)
Director of Finance and Administration; B.A.B.A., Mississippi College

PAIGE, DARNELL (2015)
CLE Assistant

PAIGE, TIFFANY (2012)
Director of Admissions and Diversity Initiatives; B.S., Jackson State University; J.D., Mississippi College; MLIS, University of Southern Mississippi

RAPP, JIM (2012)
Security; B.S., University of Southern Mississippi

UPTON, TAMMY (2005)
Director, Continuing Legal Education and MLi Press; Study, Hinds Community College

WALSH, DEAN (2014)
Building Superintendent

WELCH, CRYSTAL (2010)
Director, Adoption Project; B.A., Bowdoin College; J.D., Mississippi College School of Law

WHITEHEAD, KAREN (2003)
Bookstore Manager

YOUNG, STEPHANIE (2014)
Director of Annual Giving; B.A., Tougaloo College; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi

Full-Time Faculty

ANDERSON, JOHN P. (2010)
Associate Professor of Law
B.A., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., J.D., University of Virginia; former associate, Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP, Washington, D.C.; former senior associate, Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale &. Dorr, Washington, D.C.; former adjunct professor, Washington College of Law, American University; former instructor, University of Virginia, former Intelligence Specialist, United States Marine Corps Reserves; admitted to practice in the District of Columbia, and United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.

BENNETT, PATRICIA W. (1989)
Professor of Law and Director, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Center
B.A., Tougaloo College; J.D., Mississippi College; former Assistant United States Attorney; former Assistant District Attorney; former Special Assistant Attorney General, State of Mississippi; admitted to practice in the state courts in Mississippi, Federal Courts, and United States Supreme Court; member, Charles Clark Inn, American Inns of Court; member, Capital Area, Magnolia, Mississippi, Federal, and American Bar Associations; Butler, Snow, O'Mara, Stevens and Cannada Lecturer in Law, 1995

CAMPBELL, DONALD C. (2008)
Distinguished Lecturer in Law
B.A., summa cum laude, University of Southern Mississippi, J.D., summa cum laude, Mississippi College; Ph.D. candidate., University of Florida; member, University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy; member, Mississippi College Law Review; former partner, Heilman, Kennedy, Graham, P.A.; former associate, Forman, Perry, Watkins, Krutz & Tardy; Jackson, Mississippi, law clerk to the Honorable Leslie Southwick, United States Court of Appeal for the Fifth Circuit; former adjunct instructor, Mississippi College School of Law; admitted to practice in Mississippi and Florida; coauthor, Professional Responsibility for Mississippi Lawyers and Commentary on Judicial Ethics in Mississippi.

CHALLENER, DEBORAH (2003)
Professor of Law
B.A., Oberlin College; M.P.P., Vanderbilt University; J.D., University of Tennessee; Editor-In-Chief, Tennessee Law Review; former law clerk, Hon. Deanell Reece Tacha, former Chief Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit; former law clerk, Hon. Thomas A. Wiseman, Jr., United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee; former associate, Morrison & Forester, San Francisco, California; admitted to practice in California.

CHRISTY, J. GORDON (2002)
Professor of Law
B.A., with honors and special honors in Philosophy, University of Texas at Austin; J.D., with honors, University of Texas at Austin; Member, Texas Law Review; Order of the Coif (Faculty, University of Oklahoma College of Law); post-graduate study in philosophy, University of Edinburgh (Scotland); former Associate Professor of Law, University of Oklahoma College of Law; former partner, Johnson & Gibbs and Strasburger & Price, Dallas, Texas; Special Counsel to the Deputy General Counsel, Ford Motor Company; member, State Bar of Michigan.

COPELAND, META (2008)
Director of Experiential Learning and Assistant Director, Public Service Law Center
B.A., magna cum laude, Oglethorpe University; J.D., magna cum laude, Mississippi College; former associate, Brunini, Grantham, Grower, Hewes, LLC.; Wise, Carter Child & Caraway, P.A.; former Director of Professional Development, and adjunct professor, Mississippi College School of Law; admitted to practice in Mississippi state and federal courts, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; member, Capital Area, Mississippi and American Bar Associations.

EDWARDS, CECILE C. (1982)
Professor of Law
B.B.A., with distinction, J.D., with honors, University of Mississippi; LL.M. (in Corporate Law), New York University; former associate, Stennett, Wilkinson and Ward, Jackson, Mississippi; former Visiting Professor of Law, University of Alabama; former Visiting Professor of Law, University of Seattle; admitted to practice in Mississippi; member, Mississippi and American Bar Associations; former chair, Business Law Section, Mississippi Bar.

HASKELL, JOHN DIXON (2012)
Associate Professor of Law and Co-Director, International and Comparative Law Center
B.A., California State University, Northridge; J.D., University of California, Hastings; LL.M., Ph.D., University of London; Assistant Director, Institute for the Study of Political Economy and Law; former Lecturer in Law, Durham Law School (U.K.); former Visiting Assistant Professor, International University College (Bulgaria); former Fulbright Fellow

HENKEL, CHRISTOPH K. (2009)
Professor of Law, Co-Director International and Comparative Law Center, and Director Summer Program (Berlin, Germany),  1st German State Exam in Law, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen School of Law (Germany); 2nd German State Exam in Law; LL.M., SJ.D. , University of Wisconsin; Law Clerk, District Court of Appeals, State of Hesse (Germany); former Interim Director LL.M. Program (2009-2011), former Visiting Professor of Law , Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis, Indiana; former adjunct, The John Marshall School of Law, Chicago Illinois; former Visiting Professor of Law, Concordia International School of Law; former contract attorney, Schopf & Weiss, LLP, Chicago, Illinois ; former contract attorney, Eckert Seamans, Cherin, & Mellot, LLC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; admitted to practice in Michigan.

HETHERINGTON, H. LEE (1976)
Professor of Law
B.A., Millsaps College; J.D., University of Mississippi; LL.M. (in Trade Regulation), New York University; formerly House Legal Counsel and Assistant to the President, Peermusic, New York City and Jackson, Mississippi; former Group Vice President, Columbia Pictures Television, Burbank, California; former adjunct professor of law, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, California; former Visiting Professor of Law, Catholic University of America and Whittier School of Law; admitted to practice in Mississippi and New York. Member, Capital Area, Mississippi and American Bar Associations; author, The Lawyer's Guide to Negotiation (with Frascogna); This Business of Artist Management (3rd ed.) (with Frascogna), and This Business of Internet Law (with Frascogna & Howell).

JOHNSON, JUDITH J. (1984)
Professor of Law
B.A., with honors, University of Texas at Austin; J.D., with distinction, University of Mississippi; former law clerk to Hon. Charles Clark, former Chief Judge United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; former partner, Miller, Milam, Johnson and Moeller, Jackson, Mississippi; former president, Jackson Young Lawyers Association; former president, Capital Area Bar Association; former chairman, Mississippi Law Institute; former secretary and former member, Board of Directors, Mississippi Bar Young Lawyers Division; member, Charles Clark Inn, American Inns of Court; Fellow, Mississippi Bar Foundation; Chair, Mississippi Judicial Advisory Study Committee, Subcommittee on Criminal Code Reform; admitted to practice in Mississippi; member Capital Area, Mississippi, and American Bar Associations

KENNEDY, SHIRLEY T. (1999)
Instructor, Director of Child Advocacy Programs, and Director, Family and Children's Law Center
B.F.A., with honors, University of Texas; J.D., with special distinction, Mississippi College; former associate, Brunini, Grantham, Grower & Hewes, Jackson, Mississippi; former member, Charles Clark Inn, American Inns of Court; admitted to practice in Mississippi; member, Mississippi Bar Association.

KUPENDA, ANGELA MAE (1995)
Professor of Law
B.S., summa cum laude, Jackson State University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School; J.D., with special distinction, Mississippi College; former law clerk to Hon. Charles Clark, former Chief Judge United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; former law clerk to Hon. Paul Roney, Senior Judge and former Chief Judge United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit; former associate, Arnold and Porter, Washington, D.C.; former associate, Phelps Dunbar, L.L.P., Jackson, Mississippi; former Distinguished Visiting Professor of Teaching Excellence, Franklin Pierce Law Center; former Visiting Associate Professor, Boston College Law School; former Visiting Professor, Notre Dame Law School; admitted to practice in Mississippi and the District of Columbia; member, Magnolia, Mississippi, American and National Bar Associations.

LEE, J. LARRY (1979)
Professor of Law and Director, Business and Tax Law Center
B.S., Mississippi College; J.D., University of Mississippi; LL.M. (in Taxation), New York University; former attorney, Internal Revenue Service; former partner, Dossett, Magruder and Montgomery, Jackson, Mississippi; admitted to practice in Mississippi; member, Capital Area, Mississippi and American Bar Associations.

LOWERY, VICKI (2005)
Director of Advocacy and External Competitions and Assistant Director, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Center
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; J.D., Mississippi College; former associate, McGlinchey Stafford, Jackson, Mississippi; former associate, Baker Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, Jackson, Mississippi; former legal research assistant, Mississippi Supreme Court.

MEYER, RICHARD (2011)
Director of the LL.M. Program for Foreign Trained Lawyers;
B.A., Illinois State University; J.D., Northern Illinois University; LL.M., Judge Advocate General's School; LL.M., J.S.D. (candidate), Columbia University; former Judge Advocate, United States Army; former Associate Professor, United States Military Academy; former Adjunct Faculty, Columbia University Law School; former Adjunct Faculty, University of Maryland; former Adjunct Faculty, Western International University; former Legal Instructor & Writer, United States Military Intelligence School.

McINTOSH, PHILLIP L. (1991)
Associate Dean for International Programs and Professor of Law (See listing in Administration section)

MODAK-TRURAN, MARK C. (1998)
J. Will Young Professor of Law
B.A., magna cum laude, Gustavus Adolphus College; J.D., Northwestern University; A.M., Ph.D., The University of Chicago; former Adjunct Professor of Law, Northwestern University; former associate, Schiff, Hardin & Waite and Grippo & Elden, Chicago, Illinois; former Arbitrator, Cook County Mandatory Arbitration Program, Chicago, Illinois; admitted to practice in Illinois and the Northern District of Illinois; member, American Bar Association, American Academy of Religion, and Society of Christian Ethics; former co-chair, Section on Law and Religion, Association of American Law Schools; MC Distinguished Professor of the Year 2008.

NG (BOYTE), ALINA (2007)
Professor of Law
LL.B, first in class, Champion's Trophy for Best Student; Director's Prize; University of London; LL.M., University of Cambridge; J.S.M., J.S.D., Stanford University; Cambridge Commonwealth Trust Scholarship; Editor, Stanford Environmental Law Journal; Lieberman Fellowship; Fulbright Scholarship; former Senior Executive, Multimedia Development Corporation, Cyberjaya, Malaysia.

ROSENBLATT, JAMES H. (2003)
Dean Emeritus and Professor of Law
B.A. Vanderbilt University; J.D., Cornell University; Commander and Staff Judge Advocate, The Judge Advocate General's Corps, U.S. Army (retired); former Instructor, The Judge Advocate General's School; Dean, Mississippi College School of Law 2003-2014; admitted to practice in New York and Missouri; member New York and Missouri bars and the American Bar Association.

SCOTT, WENDY B. (2014)
Dean and The Henry Vaughan Watkins and Selby Watkins McRae Professor of Law (See listing in Administration section.)

SEAMONE, EVAN (2015)
Director of Legal Writing
B.A., summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, University of California, Los Angeles; M.P.P., University of California, Los Angeles; J.D. University of Iowa College of Law, Articles Editor Iowa Law Review; LL.M. with Specialization in Criminal Law, Judge Advocate General's (JAG) School, U.S. Army.  Former professor of legal research and writing at the Army JAG School, criminal law division chief, capital litigator, and war crimes prosecutor.

SMITH, BENJAMIN (2015)
Director of Academic Success and Bar Preparation
B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville; J.D., Florida State University College of Law, Mock Trial Team; former Associate General Counsel, Tennessee Department of Children's Services, Nashville, TN; former Associate, DHPM, PC, Nashville, TN; former Academic Success Counselor, Florida Coastal School of Law, Jacksonville, FL; admitted to practice in Tennessee (inactive)

STEFFEY, MATTHEW SCOTT (1990)
Professor of Law
B.A., University of South Florida; J.D., with high honors, Florida State University; Order of the Coif; LL.M., Columbia University; former associate, Carlton, Fields, Ward, Emmanuel, Smith & Cutler, P.A., Tampa, Florida; admitted to practice in Florida; Reporter, Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Rules; Reporter, Mississippi Judicial Advisory Study Committee, Subcommittee on Criminal Code Reform; Reporter, Commission on Courts in the Twenty-First Century, Appellate Courts Subcommittee; Butler, Snow, O'Mara, Stevens and Cannada Lecturer in Law, 1997-99.

WILL, JONATHAN (2009)
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Faculty Development, Professor of Law and Director, Bioethics and Health Law Center
(See listing in Administration section)

Part-time Visiting Faculty (Summer)

McCANN, MICHAEL
Distinguished Visiting Hall of Fame Professor of Law
B.A., magna cum laude, Georgetown University, J.D., University of Virginia, LL.M., Harvard University; Editor-in-Chief, Virginia Sports and Entertainment Law Journal; Hardy Cross Dillard Fellow; former House Judiciary Committee Fellow, U.S. Representative Martin T. Meehan of Massachusetts; former Visiting Scholar/Researcher, Harvard Law School; former partner, Paragon Law Group (Boston); Associate, Testa, Hurwitz & Thibeault (Boston); former Assistant Professor of Law, Mississippi College School of Law; former Visiting Professor of Law, Boston College; member, American and Massachusetts Bar Associations, Sports Lawyers Association, and Food and Drug Law Institute; Professor of Law, University of New Hampshire School of Law.

Adjunct Faculty

A list of MC Law's outstanding adjunct faculty can be viewed at http://law.mc.edu/faculty-staff/faculty/.

Financial Aid
and Tuition Information

Financial Aid

MC Law grants some scholarships based on merit. Students with financial need may apply for the federal Direct Loans, Graduate Plus Loans, and College Work Study. To be considered for federal aid, students must complete the FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA). This form may be obtained online from www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Loans, Work Study, Scholarships

MC Law offers assistance through the federal Direct Loan Program, college work study, institutional scholarships and a limited number of credit based Graduate Plus loans. (Federal Pell Grants are reserved for undergraduate students only.) Loans are processed after the student completes and returns the FAFSA. Students must use Mississippi College School of Law code #E00479 on the FAFSA for the school to receive their information. A maximum of $20,500 per year will be awarded under the Federal Direct Loans programs. Further information regarding loans and college work study may be obtained by contacting the Financial Aid office at 601-925-7110.  For more detailed information regarding merit-based institutional scholarships, consult the section on Scholarships and Awards in this catalog.

Satisfactory Progress to Maintain Financial Aid

Students on academic probation will be eligible to receive financial assistance for the first semester on academic probation, and for the second semester, provided substantial academic progress was made during the first semester of probation. Students will be ineligible to receive financial assistance during the first semester back in school following academic suspension, if the student is allowed to re-enroll.

Students who are denied financial assistance due to unsatisfactory academic progress have the right to appeal the denial. Students should place in writing the request to appeal to the Academic Standards Committee. (Contact the Financial Aid Coordinator, 601-925-7110)

Payment of Accounts

All accounts are due and payable at the time of registration. No credit for course work done will be awarded, nor transcripts provided, until all accounts are paid.

Payment Arrangements

Cash - If not using the monthly payment plan or a credit card, a check for the exact amount may be written before registration.

Monthly Payment Plan - The law school offers a Monthly Payment Plan, a convenient method for planning and budgeting tuition and fees for the Fall or Spring semester. Under this plan, costs may be paid with up to five (5) monthly payments per semester. Participation in the plan is only allowed with direct debit to a bank account. Applications and more detailed information (including payment dates and deadlines for enrolling) may be obtained by contacting the Mississippi College Bursar's Office. A nonrefundable fee of $20 per semester covers the costs of administration of the program and must accompany the application. Application must be made each semester for the plan.

Information regarding the Monthly Payment Plan may be obtained by any one of the following: Mississippi College website, http://www.mc.edu/offices/financial-aid/payment-plans/, by contacting the Bursar's Office at 601-925-3309 or 1-800-738-1287, or by e-mail at bursar@mc.edu. Students who pay by credit card incur additional fees charged by the third party provider. Please note that VISA is not accepted for credit card payments.

Payment by International Students

Before an international student may register, the student must have on deposit with the Bursar's Office sufficient funds to cover expenses for an entire year and must provide an approved medical and repatriation insurance policy with Mississippi College as the trustee beneficiary.

Dormitory

As availability permits, some residence hall rooms on the Mississippi College campus in Clinton may be open to law students. For dormitory information, please call Residence Life at (601) 925-3359.

Expenses

Tuition and Fees for Law School for AY 2016-2017

 

Fee Type

Amount for AY 2016-2017

Tuition (per hour), J.D. Program

 

a. 3L Students

$1,037 (fixed for remainder of school)

b. 2L Students

$1,068 (fixed for remainder of school)

c. 1L Students

$1,068 (fixed for remainder of school)

 

 

Registration Fee (fixed)

 

5 hours or less

$75

6-11 hours

$120

12 hours or more

$185

Campus Dining Fee (per semester)

$100

Activity Fee

$190 (includes free transcripts, electronic calendar book and medical basic visits)

Application Fee (non-refundable)

$0 to $50 (depending on the type of application)

Automation Fee (per semester)

$150

Duplicate ID Card Fee

$5

Graduation Fee (includes a complimentary photo)

$120 (only charged in the year of graduation)

Health Services Fee $40

Replacement Diploma Fee

$70

Replacement Clicker Fee

$30

Late Registration Fee

$30

Parking Fee (per semester)

$170

Removal of Incomplete Grade Fee

$30

Returned Check Fee

$30

Locker Fee

$20 per semester (optional)

Transcript Fee

No charge for current students, $15 for all other transcripts

Transfer Application Fee
(per school to which a packet is sent)

$40

Applicant Visit Fee

$25

Visits away to another Law School

Pay tuition and fees to MC Law at the MC Law rate, who in turn will pay the host law school-if tuition/fees at host school are more expensive, the extra amount to cover the difference would also be paid to MC Law

Acceptance Deposits
(applied to account upon enrollment)

$250 (initial deposit)
$350 (second deposit)
Adjustments permitted based on date of acceptance, scholarship status, and application status.  Timing of deposit varies with the program.

Supplemental course materials

Actual cost of reproduction and binder

Refund Policy

The charges and fees to attend MC Law and the refund policies have been approved by the Board of Trustees and are designed to be as fair as possible to both the University and the student.

Refund on Withdrawal from Mississippi College School of Law

A student desiring to withdraw from MC Law should initiate the process using the Complete Withdrawal link in the MyMC student portal.  It is necessary for the correct procedure to be followed. Failure to process an official withdrawal earns a grade of F in each course. Deadlines for withdrawal are the same as those for dropping courses.

Any claims for refunds of tuition will be based on the date on which the student files a completed withdrawal form with the Director of Law School Records.

Refund on Tuition upon Withdrawal

Note: that in counting deadlines (for changes of schedule, refunds, etc.), the first week of the semester is the calendar week in which registration begins.

For withdrawal during Fall and Spring: Refund credit:

 

1st week

100%

2nd week

75%

3rd week

50%

4th week

25%

5th week

0%
 

 

For withdrawal during
10 week summer terms: Refund credit:

Registration day through 3rd day of 1st term

100%

4th and 5th days of 1st term

75%

6th and 7th days of 1st term

50%

8th and 9th days of 1st term

25%

10th day of 1st term

0%

Refund on Courses Dropped

For courses dropped during Fall and Spring: Refund credit:

1st week

100%

2nd week

0%
 

 

For courses dropped during
10 week summer terms: Refund credit:

 

Registration day through 3rd day of the term

100%

4th day of the term

0%

Refund on Residence Halls

Room charges will not be refunded should a student withdraw from school or cease to be a resident student.

Refund on Other Fees

Fees other than those outlined above are not refundable upon withdrawal.

Refunds/Return of Title IV Funds

When a student withdraws from classes, the student may be entitled to receive money back which had been paid to the University. The University may be able to refund all or a portion of the tuition, fees, etc., the student paid. If the tuition, fees, etc., were paid with Title IV financial aid, all or a portion of the student's refund must be returned to the student aid programs from which the money was awarded. A student who receives a cash disbursement to assist with living expenses and then withdraws, may be required to return money to the aid programs from which the money was awarded.

Federal regulations require Mississippi College to have a fair and equitable refund policy. If a recipient of Title IV aid withdraws during a period of enrollment, Mississippi College must calculate the amount of Title IV aid the student did not earn. The percentage of aid earned is equal to the percentage of time not completed. Unearned Title IV funds must be returned to the Title IV programs.

If a student withdraws on or before the 60% point of enrollment, the percentage of aid earned is equal to the percentage of time completed. If a student remains enrolled beyond the 60% point of enrollment period, 100% of the aid has been earned for that period.

All unearned Title IV funds must be returned to the Title IV programs. If Title IV aid was used to pay institutional charges first, the University will return unearned Title IV funds up to an amount that is equal to the amount disbursed to the U.S. Department of Education.

Funds are returned in the following order up to the full amount disbursed:

  1. Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loan,
  2. Federal Subsidized Direct Loan,
  3. Federal Plus Loan,

Refund on Withdrawal from Mississippi College School of Law

A student desiring to withdraw from the University should initiate the process using the Complete Withdrawal link in the MyMC student portal.  It is necessary for the correct procedure to be followed. Failure to process an official withdrawal earns a grade of F in each course. Deadlines for withdrawal are the same as those for dropping courses.

Any claims for refunds of tuition will be based on the date on which the student files a completed withdrawal form with the Director of Law School Records.

Scholarships & Awards

MC Law is committed to attracting highly qualified applicants to attend MC Law. Applicants with outstanding credentials and strong records may be awarded scholarships in fixed dollar amounts for the first year of law school. These scholarships require no separate application, and all applicants will be considered for scholarship awards. Because MC Law acts on admissions applications and awards scholarships on a rolling basis, applicants are advised to submit an application early and ensure its completeness. These scholarships will be renewed if a stated level of academic performance is attained as measured at the end of the academic year. Each scholarship recipient will be advised as to the required retention standard.

MC Law also recognizes and rewards outstanding academic performance on the part of students who attend MC Law without a scholarship in the first year. Students who have an initial fixed dollar scholarship may also see an increase in their scholarship based on outstanding academic performance during the first year.

At the end of the first year, as a minimum the top four students in the class will receive a full tuition scholarship for their second year (if not already receiving a full tuition scholarship). All students in the top 10% of the class will be guaranteed to receive a scholarship for a fixed dollar amount for their second year. Fixed dollar scholarships also may be awarded to students in the top 20% of the class, but are not guaranteed. The amount of new or increased fixed dollar scholarships awarded varies each year and is dependent on budget and other factors. The scholarships awarded at the end of the first year may be renewed based on a specified level of academic performance during the second year. Each scholarship recipient will be advised of the required retention standard.

At the end of the second year, as a minimum the top four students in the class will receive a full tuition scholarship for their third year (if not already on a full tuition scholarship). All students in the top 10% of the class will be guaranteed to receive a scholarship for a fixed dollar amount for their third year. Fixed dollar scholarships also may be awarded to students in the top 20% of the class, but are not guaranteed. As noted above the amounts of new or increased fixed dollar scholarships will vary.

Retention standards vary for the different types and amounts of scholarships, but each student will be advised of the retention standards for the scholarship awarded.

For those students who have scholarship or tuition assistance from other sources, MC Law reserves the right to limit its funding for scholarships noted above depending on the nature of the outside scholarship or assistance.  Students who complete their degree early may have their scholarships prorated.

In addition to institutional scholarships, a number of other scholarships and awards are available in recognition of excellence as shown by academic potential, academic performance, demonstrated leadership, potential for contribution to the legal profession, or based on financial need. More information regarding scholarship and awards may be found on the MC Law website: http://law.mc.edu/prospective-students/prospective-students/scholarships/.

Limited funding is available for scholarships for LL.M. students. Scholarships for LL.M. students may be awarded based on need or merit. LL.M. applicants will be evaluated for scholarship eligibility as part of the application and matriculation process and after the Fall Semester.

Standards of Conduct

Law students are expected to maintain acceptable standards of conduct in their personal and professional activities at all times.  In matters of academic integrity, students are expected to comply with the MC Law Honor Code.  Breaches of acceptable standards may result in action by the Dean of MC Law who exercises authority over law students for personal or academic misconduct.  This authority is separate and apart from the authority of criminal or civil authorities and is exercised from an education perspective.  Education actions may vary depending on the circumstances but may include dismissal from law school.  The Honor Code Advisor assists the Dean in resolving allegations of Honor Code violations and other misconduct as set forth in the Honor Code.

Proceedings to examine alleged misconduct are educational proceedings and may vary in form depending on the circumstances. The law student will be provided due process in such proceedings, but does not have the right to have an attorney present in the proceedings. The due process rights are notice, an opportunity to be heard, and notice of the action taken.

Use of Mississippi College computer resources is subject to the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP). The AUP can be found at Acceptable Use Policy. Failure to read the AUP does not excuse the student from the requirements and regulations contained therein.

Drug-free Environment

The use, possession, or distribution of illicit drugs by students at MC Law is expressly forbidden and the same shall not be tolerated on any property owned or controlled by Mississippi College, nor shall the same be tolerated at or as a part of any activity undertaken at or under the direction or supervision of Mississippi College. In addition to possible legal sanctions, disciplinary action for violation of this regulation may include expulsion or other severe penalty.

Alcohol Policy

Alcoholic beverages will not be served or consumed on the MC Law campus.

Firearms Policy

Firearms are not permitted on the MC Law campus except those used by law enforcement personnel in their official capacity.

Harassment Policy

Mississippi College's policy regarding "Sexual Harassment, Fraternization & Workplace Harassment" is found in Policy 3.11 of the university's Policies and Procedure Manual. MC Law follows those procedures. For other forms of harassment not covered by this policy, MC Law will use the complaint policy above or faculty created procedures (listed below) to resolve those allegations. It should be noted that the normal give and take of the classroom and the utilization of standard classroom teaching procedures involving the questioning students, challenging student reasoning, and commenting on academic matters does not constitute harassment and will not be subject to these procedures. MC Law is committed to the fair treatment of its students, faculty, and employees and expects actions of those in the MC Law community to reflect the respect and dignity afforded to fellow human beings.

Mississippi College School of Law Harassment Policy

Mississippi College School of Law, as a constituent school of Mississippi College, an institution of Christian higher education, is committed to the belief that human beings are God's creations, equally entitled to dignity and respect. It is the belief of the faculty and administration that lawyers and law students, in particular, should strive to uphold the highest standards of respect for all persons. In keeping with this belief and commitment, the Law School has adopted the following Harassment Policy:

1) Mississippi College School of Law is committed to protecting academic freedom and freedom of expression of all members of the Law School community. This policy of harassment shall be applied in a manner that protects academic freedom and freedom of expression of all parties to a complaint.

2) The law school prohibits harassment on the basis of gender, race, color, national origin, age, sexual orientation, or disability where such conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive to offend a reasonable person and to unreasonably interfere with such person's academic or work performance or otherwise create a hostile academic or work environment.

3) In addition, Mississippi College School of Law prohibits sexual harassment. Sexual harassment means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (a) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person's employment or education; (b) submission to or rejection of such conduct by a person is used as the basis for significant academic or employment decisions affecting such person; or (c) such conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive to offend a reasonable person and to unreasonably interfere with such person's academic or work performance or otherwise create a hostile academic or work environment.

Examples:

The following examples of such behavior are not meant to be illustrative, but not exhaustive, of conduct that could possibly constitute sexual harassment, if unwanted:

A. Physical assault.

B. Direct sexual propositions, invitations, or other pressure for sexual activity.

C. Subtle pressure for sexual activity, an element of which may be conduct such as leering or ogling.

D. Direct or implied threats that submission to sexual advances will be a condition of employment, work status, promotion, grades, or letters of recommendation.

E. A pattern of conduct not legitimately related to the subject matter of a course, if one is involved, intended to discomfort or humiliate, or both, that includes one or more of the following: comments of a sexual nature or sexually explicit statements, questions, jokes, or anecdotes.

F. A pattern of conduct that would discomfort or humiliate, or both, a reasonable person at whom the conduct was directed that includes one or more of the following: unnecessary touching, patting, hugging or brushing against a person's body; remarks of a sexual nature about a person's clothing or body; or remarks about a person's sexual activity or speculations about a person's sexual experience.

G. A pattern of conduct which implies discrimination or hostility toward a person's personal, professional, or academic interests because of sex.
 

H. Exhibiting lewd photographs or calendars.

4) This policy is intended to protect students, faculty, (including adjunct faculty), administration, and staff (i.e. "the member") from harassment by anyone that the member comes into contact with on the Law School property or as a result of Law School-sponsored or Law School-related events and activities. It is intended to protect the members from harassment by other students, faculty (including adjunct faculty), administration, staff, contractors, visitors, interviewers, and other such persons. The Law School will make its best efforts to prevent and remedy the situation, keeping in mind that the Law School's ability to prevent and remedy the harassment will vary with the amount of control the Law School has over the alleged harasser.

5) Any member of the Law School community who believes the member has been subjected to harassing conduct is encouraged to speak to the Assistant Dean of Students, unless it is inappropriate or uncomfortable for the member to do so. In such a case, the member may speak with the Associate Dean for Academics or the Title IX/EEO Coordinator at Mississippi College. If the member is not satisfied with the resolution, the member may make a written appeal to the Dean of the Law School, or--if the matter involves the Dean--to the Vice President for Academic Affairs at Mississippi College. Action on the appeal is final.

6) Any staff or faculty member receiving a report that conduct may be legally actionable shall refer the member to the Assistant Dean of Students, under normal circumstances, but when it is inappropriate to report the matter to the Assistant Dean of Students or as requested by the student, the referral may be made to any of the persons listed to whom such initial reports may be made.

7) All reports made to the Assistant Dean of Students or to any of the listed persons will, if unresolved, be reported to the Dean unless it is inappropriate to do so or at the request of the member. In such a case the incident should be reported to the Vice President for Academic Affairs at Mississippi College or to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator at Mississippi College.

8) Any complaint of harassment will be investigated in a fair and expeditious manner. The confidentiality of all parties will be respected to the extent possible insofar as it does not interfere with the Law School's legal obligation to investigate allegations and take corrective measures or as otherwise provided by law. If it is determined that inappropriate conduct has occurred, the Law School will act promptly to eliminate the offending conduct to the extent that it is within the Law School's control. Any retaliation against any person complaining or cooperating in an investigation shall not be tolerated.

9) This policy shall not be construed to impose liability on the Law School or Mississippi College for acts of harassment for which it is not otherwise legally liable; nor shall this policy be deemed to waive any exemptions from Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 or any other provision of law to which the school may be entitled.

10) The Law School will notify the Title IX/EEO Coordinator of Mississippi College when necessary, to coordinate resolution of complaints.
 

Listing of Contact Information for Educational Officials at the Law School and at Mississippi College (MC)

Title

Name

Phone

Email

Assistant Dean of Students

Sheryl Johnson

601-925-7109

ssjohnson@mc.edu

Associate Dean for Academics

Jonathan Will

601-925-7102

will@mc.edu

Law School Dean

Wendy Scott

601-925-7101

Wbscott@mc.edu

Vice President for Academics, MC

Dr. Ron Howard

601-925-3202

Howard@mc.edu

Title IX/EEO Coordinator, MC

Dr. Debbie Norris

601-925-3260

DNorris@mc.edu

Student Complaints Procedure

Application

This procedure is available for resolving student complaints that involve the MC Law program of legal education. Its process-while not mandatory-may also be used to resolve other complaints that directly involve MC Law. This procedure will not be used if there is another procedure that is specifically provided for a certain type of complaint. There is no appeal process for grades, and this procedure does not apply to complaints regarding grades.

Informal Action

When faced with a matter of concern, a student should-as would a wise attorney-attempt to resolve the issue at the lowest level using informal methods. It is often helpful to approach the person with a relationship to the concern and make that concern known. Very often simply making known the concern will permit a discussion and a resolution.

Formal Complaint

If informal procedures do not provide for a resolution of the concern, a student may make a written complaint to the Associate Dean for Academics (for academic matters), the Assistant Dean for Students (non-academic matters), or another official designated by the Dean. The written complaint should state the nature of the concern, describe what steps were taken in an attempt to resolve the concern, and provide any relevant information which would assist in reviewing the complaint.

Complaint Resolution

The official receiving the complaint will inquire into the matter and work to resolve the complaint. After completing the inquiry and resolution steps, the official will provide a written decision to the student. The official may obtain the assistance of others in this process. There will be no hearings, but the official may discuss this matter with the student.

Appeal

If the student is dissatisfied with the decision, the student may appeal the decision to the Dean. The appeal should be in writing, must include the basis for the appeal and the reasons why the decision was not appropriate, and include any information that would be helpful in acting on the appeal. The appeal must be received by the Dean's office within 21 calendar days from the date of the decision. The Dean will decide the appeal and provide a written action on the appeal to the student. The Dean's decision is final and may not be appealed.

Records

MC Law will maintain a copy of all complaints, decisions, and appeal actions.

Good Faith

Complaints made in good faith are important to the proper functioning of MC Law and resolving matters of concern to students. No retaliation or adverse action may be taken against a student who submits a complaint in good faith.

Admissions to a State Bar

All students who intend to apply for admission to a state bar should consult with the specific state bar for requirements. Many states require both registration as a law student and a bar exam application. Also, fees for students who are late in registering are often substantially higher. For information pertaining to bar requirements in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the various United States territories, the National Conference of Bar Examiner's website provides links to the various bar admissions offices at www.ncbex.org. For students who intend to seek bar admission in Mississippi, the Mississippi Board of Bar Admissions website is www.mssc.state.ms.us/baradmissions/baradmissions.html.

While MC Law provides information about bar examinations and bar admissions requirements to our students, nevertheless, students have the primary responsibility to acquaint themselves with the requirements of any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission to practice law.

Additional information regarding the need for prospective students to research the admissions requirements of State Bars can be found at http://law.mc.edu/prospective-students/bar-admission/.

Law Library

The law library is an integral part of the total law school program. With a collection of more than 348,000 volumes and volume equivalents, the library exceeds the basic research needs of the law student and the practicing attorney. Around this nucleus the law library is rapidly developing resources that will also serve the needs of legal scholars and specialists. Emphasis is placed on the development of the collections of statutes, legal periodicals, federal and state legislative materials, reports of all federal courts, and reports of all state appellate courts. Federal administrative agency materials, specialized loose-leaf services, and treatises to meet needs in areas of importance are also being collected. The law library is a member of the American Association of Law Libraries and is a selective U.S. Government depository library.

The law library operates a computer lab to give students access to computer-assisted legal instruction, electronic legal instruction, and word processing services.

The law library, located on the first, second and third floors of the law school, is designed to provide appropriate facilities for students, faculty, and visiting attorneys. Separate areas are available for individual and group study, photocopying, microforms and computerized legal research. Westlaw, Lexis, and internet databases are accessible in the computer lab and by wireless access. Students have access to wireless printing.

Professional Librarians

DRESSLER, GINGER (1997)
Acquisitions/Cataloging Librarian, B.S., Northeast Louisiana University; M.L.I.S., University of Southern Mississippi

HUCKABY, JUSTIN (2012)
Research, Instructional Services & Circulation Librarian; B.A., Millsaps College; M.S.(L.I.S.) Drexel University; J.D., Mississippi College

MILLER, MARY E. (1999)
Assistant Dean for Information, Technology, and Research and Professor of Law; B.A., Asbury College; M.L.S., University of Southern Mississippi; J.D., Mississippi College

WALTER, THOMAS B. (1999)
Reference/Computer Services Librarian, B.S., Mississippi State University; J.D.,Mississippi College

Staff

CANTRELL, TIWANA (2011)
Circulation Assistant

COLE, DANIEL (2004)
Director of Information Technology; B.S., Mississippi College

FRANKLIN, VAN (2014)
IT Assistant; B.S., Mississippi College; M.Div., Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary

JONES, SHARON (2007)
Cataloging Supervisor; Study, Hinds Community College, Jackson State University

ROBY, LEONTYNE (2008)
Acquisitions Assistant/Mail Clerk

College Administration

General Officers

ROYCE, LEE G. (2002)
President of the University
B.A., M.B.A., Ed.D., Vanderbilt University

HOWARD, RONALD (1977)
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professor of History
B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville

CRANFORD, BILL (2000)
Chief Information Officer
B.S., University of Mississippi; M.B.A., Mississippi College

LEWIS, DONNA (1998)
Chief Financial Officer
B.S., University of Mississippi; CPA

NORRIS, DEBBIE C. (1984)
Vice President for Planning and Assessment, Dean of Graduate Studies, and Associate Professor of Business
B.S.B.A., Mississippi College; M.Ed., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., University of Mississippi

PRATT, ERIC (2002)
Vice President for Christian Development
B.A., Vanderbilt University; M. Div., Ph.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; post-doctoral study, Loyola University

STANFORD, STEVE (1999)
Vice President for Administration and Government Relations
B.S.E., M.Ed., Delta State University; Ph.D., Florida State University

TOWNSEND, JR., WILLIAM R. "BILL" (2008)
Vice President for Advancement and Legal Counsel to the President
B.A., Mississippi College; J.D., Mississippi College; M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

TURCOTTE, JIM (1994)
Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Affairs
B.S.B.A., Mississippi College; M.R.E., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of North Texas

Academic Deans

BALDWIN, STAN (1999)
Dean of the School of Science and Mathematics and Assistant Professor and Chair of Biological Sciences; Acting Chair of Computer Science and Physics
B.S., Asbury College; M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of Kentucky College of Medicine; Postdoctoral Research, Ohio State University College of Medicine

EDUARDO, MARCELO (1997)
Dean of the School of Business and Professor of Finance
B.A., M.B.A., Delta State University; Ph.D., University of Mississippi

LOCKE, DON W. (1998)
Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Psychology and Counseling
B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi College; Ed.D., University of Mississippi

NORRIS, DEBBIE C. (1984)
Vice President for Planning and Assessment, Dean of Graduate Studies, and Associate Professor of Business
B.S.B.A., Mississippi College; M.Ed., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., University of Mississippi; 1998 MC London Program Resident Professor

RANDLE, JONATHAN T. (1999)
Interim Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences
B.A., Mississippi College; Affiliated A.A., M.A., Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge; Ph.D., Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge

SCOTT, WENDY B. (2014)
Dean, School of Law
B.A., Harvard University; J.D., New York University

SHARP, KIMBERLY J. (2015)
Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor of Nursing
B.A., B.S.N., Cedarville College; M.S.N., Universityof Edinburgh (Scotland); Ph.D., The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland

VANHORN, WAYNE (2005)
Dean of Christian Studies and the Arts, and Professor of Christian Studies and Philosophy
B.A., Christopher Newport College of the College of William and Mary; M.Div., Th.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

Board of Trustees of Mississippi College

Officers

Officers

 

Mr. Roy Ward, Chairman

Mr. Paul Moak, Jr., Vice-Chairman

Mrs. Gayle Flynt, Secretary

 

 

 

 Terms Expire in 2015

Terms Expire in 2016

Terms Expire in 2017

Mr. Ralph Barnes

Ms. Amanda Alexander

Rev. Barry Corbett

 Dr. Ronnie Falvey

Mr. Bill Dye

Ms. Kathy De LaPaz

 Dr. Robert E. Foster

Ms. La'Verne Edney

Mr. Fred Holm

 Mr. Roy J. Fountain

Mr. Larry Franklin

Mrs. Jane Hederman

 Mrs. Zeita Parker

Mr. Tony Huffman

Dr. Jeffrey Holland

 Rev. Hugh Plunkett

Mr. Eddie Kinchen

Judge Tom Lee

 Mr. Leland Speed

Mr. Mike Rice

Mr. Colin Maloney

 Mr. Ed Trehern

Rev. Chip Stevens

Dr. Sharon Martin

 Mr. Roy Ward

Dr. Robert Watson

Mr. Paul Moak

 Mrs. Jean Williams

Dr. Ken Weathersby

Dr. Don Phillips